B. I. News on the 'Net, December 19-31, 2021

Weather by Joe

December 31, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

At 7:15 a.m. here on Carlisle Road, it is 31 degrees with wind from the ENE at 2 mph. The humidity is 97%. The pressure is 29..74. The sky is cloudy with visibility at ten miles.

TODAY, it is expected to be cloudy with the high near 34 degrees. he wind will be from the W at 5 to 10 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for cloudy skies with a low near 18 degrees. The wind will be from the N at 10 to 15 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for cloudy skies with a high near 20 degrees. The wind will continue from the N at 10 to 15 mph.
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ON THIS DAY

In the first public demonstration of his incandescent lightbulb, American inventor Thomas Alva Edison lights up a street in Menlo Park, New Jersey. The Pennsylvania Railroad Company ran special trains to Menlo Park on the day of the demonstration in response to public enthusiasm over the event.
Although the first incandescent lamp had been produced 40 years earlier, no inventor had been able to come up with a practical design until Edison embraced the challenge in the late 1870s. After countless tests, he developed a high-resistance carbon-thread filament that burned steadily for hours and an electric generator sophisticated enough to power a large lighting system.
Born in Milan, Ohio, in 1847, Edison received little formal schooling, which was customary for most Americans at the time. He developed serious hearing problems at an early age, and this disability provided the motivation for many of his inventions. At age 16, he found work as a telegraph operator and soon was devoting much of his energy and natural ingenuity toward improving the telegraph system itself. By 1869, he was pursuing invention full-time and in 1876 moved into a laboratory and machine shop in Menlo Park, New Jersey.
Edison’s experiments were guided by his remarkable intuition, but he also took care to employ assistants who provided the mathematical and technical expertise he lacked. At Menlo Park, Edison continued his work on the telegraph, and in 1877 he stumbled on one of his great inventions–the phonograph–while working on a way to record telephone communication. Public demonstrations of the phonograph made the Yankee inventor world famous, and he was dubbed the “Wizard of Menlo Park.”
Although the discovery of a way to record and play back sound ensured him a place in the annals of history, the phonograph was only the first of several Edison creations that would transform late 19th-century life. Among other notable inventions, Edison and his assistants developed the first practical incandescent lightbulb in 1879 and a forerunner of the movie camera and projector in the late 1880s. In 1887, he opened the world’s first industrial research laboratory at West Orange, New Jersey where he employed dozens of workers to investigate systematically a given subject.

Perhaps his greatest contribution to the modern industrial world came from his work in electricity. He developed a complete electrical distribution system for light and power, set up the world’s first power plant in New York City, and invented the alkaline battery, the first electric railroad, and a host of other inventions that laid the basis for the modern electrical world. One of the most prolific inventors in history, he continued to work into his 80s and acquired 1,093 patents in his lifetime. He died in 1931 at the age of 84.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

On December 31, 1999, the United States, in accordance with the Torrijos-Carter Treaties, officially hands over control of the Panama Canal, putting the strategic waterway into Panamanian hands for the first time. Crowds of Panamanians celebrated the transfer of the 50-mile canal, which links the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and officially opened when the SS Arcon sailed through on August 15, 1914. Since then, over one million ships have used the canal.
Interest in finding a shortcut from the Atlantic to the Pacific originated with explorers in Central America in the early 1500s. In 1523, Holy Roman Emperor Charles V commissioned a survey of the Isthmus of Panama and several plans for a canal were produced, but none ever implemented. U.S. interest in building a canal was sparked with the expansion of the American West and the California gold rush in 1848. (Today, a ship heading from New York to San Francisco can save about 7,800 miles by taking the Panama Canal rather than sailing around South America.)
In 1880 a French company run by the builder of the Suez Canal started digging a canal across the Isthmus of Panama (then a part of Colombia). More than 22,000 workers died from tropical diseases such as yellow fever during this early phase of construction and the company eventually went bankrupt, selling its project rights to the United States in 1902 for $40 million. President Theodore Roosevelt championed the canal, viewing it as important to America’s economic and military interests. In 1903, Panama declared its independence from Colombia in a U.S.-backed revolution and the U.S. and Panama signed the Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty, in which the U.S. agreed to pay Panama $10 million for a perpetual lease on land for the canal, plus $250,000 annually in rent.
Over 56,000 people worked on the canal between 1904 and 1913 and over 5,600 lost their lives. When finished, the canal, which cost the U.S. $375 million to build, was considered a great engineering marvel and represented America’s emergence as a world power.
In 1977, responding to nearly 20 years of Panamanian protest, U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Panama’s General Omar Torrijos signed two new treaties that replaced the original 1903 agreement and called for a transfer of canal control in 1999. The treaty, narrowly ratified by the U.S. Senate, gave America the ongoing right to defend the canal against any threats to its neutrality. In October 2006, Panamanian voters approved a $5.25 billion plan to double the canal’s size by 2015 to better accommodate modern ships.
Ships pay tolls to use the canal, based on each vessel’s size and cargo volume. In May 2006, the Maersk Dellys paid a record toll of $249,165. The smallest-ever toll—36 cents—was paid by Richard Halliburton, who swam the canal in 1928.
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WORD OF THE DAY

Zeitgeist; noun; (TSYTE-gyste)

What It Means

Zeitgeist refers to the general intellectual, moral, and cultural climate of an era.

// Although set in the 1980s, the movie reflects the feelings and zeitgeist of today.

Examples

"The lead single and opening track, 'Smells Like Teen Spirit,' has been streamed more than 1 billion times on Spotify. Its accompanying music video has been viewed more than 1 billion times on YouTube. 'Nevermind' is the defining album of an era and generation, an embodiment of the cultural zeitgeist of the 1990s." — Hickory Daily Record (North Carolina), 28 Nov. 2021

Did You Know?

Scholars have long maintained that each era has a unique spirit, a nature or climate that sets it apart from all other epochs. In German, such a spirit is known as Zeitgeist, from the German words Zeit, meaning "time," and Geist, meaning "spirit" or "ghost."

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

From the B.I. Historical Society

December 30, 2021

Greetings to our friends and supporters of the Beaver Island Historical Society.  As we head into the New Year, I would like to say thank you for being a part of the Beaver Island Family.  The Historical Society had a good year (despite COVID challenges) and is looking forward to the New Year with the annual events, new exhibits and best of all new members and friends!

The Beaver Island Historical Society is unique among Island non-profits because we offer 5 months of events and entertainment. This consistent activity is a perfect compliment to Island one-time events like the birding weekend, music festival and Baroque. We supplement Island events with options that encourage visitors to say, “I can’t wait to come back next year”.

Your membership not only gives us the financial foundation we need, it shows support for our work. We are an integral part of our community and collaborate with business and civic organizations to bolster the Island economy. Your membership shows us that you support the ‘Beaver Island Way’ of working together for the good of all.  To renew or become a member click here.

We enjoy sending this e-letter because it allows us to review some of the reasons your membership is so important to our mission “to preserve and share the history of Beaver Island and the archipelago”.

 A few of our 2021 highlights:

●      Museum Week

○      35th annual Music on the Porch

○      35+ annual Art Show featuring the "Everyone is an Artist" program sponsored by Betsy Borre.

○      Our 2 interns developed and led the sold-out Kid’s Camp

○      Best-selling author, Miles Harvey, spoke to an overflow crowd

●      New exhibits--Gutsy Women of Beaver Island, First Land Survey of Beaver Island, and the Oswald Boyd/Marold Disaster

●      Marine Museum Mondays and Picnic on the Patio Wednesdays were lunchtime talks presented outside the museums

●      Hosted 3 Dendro Archeologists who dated various Island buildings by determining when the trees used for lumber were cut

●      Popular cemetery walks held on six Sundays

Work done by our volunteers:

●      60 volunteers worked 1000 hours doing everything from staffing museums to cutting brush

●      Clean up of Heritage Park, assembling new picnic tables and trash cans

●      Cleaned up and opened the Peter Doney house at Sand Bay

 Collaboration with the community and other non-profits:

●      Worked with the BI Chamber of Commerce and were awarded money for the Historical Driving trail signs, a new Beaver Island app and hiking trail safety improvements

●      In conjunction with the Little Traverse Conservancy and Sauve Art Foundation, opened the historical Peter Doney House as part of a Public Art Initiative  and installed two sculptures in the preserve

●      Joined forces with community members who wrote their family stories for the first volume of Beaver Island Family Histories planned for publication later this year

●      Hosted twenty first-time visitors at a day-long geocaching event

 Looking forward in 2022:

  • Museum Week is July 17 - 23.  We will feature our annual programming and offer Kids Camp again!  
  • We will add 4 new Ladies to the Gutsy Women exhibit at the Print Shop Museum  
  • The Black History 101 Mobile exhibit will be on display in April at the Print Shop Museum
  • We are hosting the Eastern Michigan University Historic Preservation Graduate Field School at the Beaver Head Lighthouse in May with related public programming!
  • Special programming for Beaver Island Family Histories
  • Expanded virtual exhibits and archival access
  • If you have a request for a specific event, please give me a call and share your ideas! 
  • Summer return of the 11-12 Marine Museum Mondays and Picnic on the Patio Wednesdays at the Print Shop - pack a lunch and stop by!
  • Marine Museum  Wooden Boat Exhibit featuring  a Bill Freese Beaver Island built boat donated by Jan Gerson
  • New High Island exhibit
  • And more!
If you love Beaver Island and would like to make a donation click here.  To become a new member click here.

Attached is the electronic version of our newsletter in case we missed you in the mail.  Past newsletters are archived on our website

Wishing you and your's health and happiness in the new year.

Lori Taylor-Blitz
Executive Director
Beaver Island Historical Society
Office: 231.448-2254
Cell: 906.361.2031

Fall Newsletter HERE

Weather by Joe

December 30, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

This morning at 7:15 a.m. on Carlisle Road, it is 12 degrees with no wind. The humidity is 99%. The pressure is 29.99. The sky is cloudy with visibility at ten miles.

TODAY, it is expected to be mainly cloudy with possible snow showers in the morning. Chance of snow is 60%. The high will be near 30 degrees. The winds will be light and variable.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for cloudy skies with snow showers developing late. Chance of snow is 50%. The low will be in the upper 20's. The wind will be from the S at 5 to 10 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for cloudy skies with a few flurries. The high will be in the low to middle 30's. The wind will be from the WSW at 5 to 10 mph.
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ON THIS DAY

In post-revolutionary Russia, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) is established, comprising a confederation of Russia, Belorussia, Ukraine and the Transcaucasian Federation (divided in 1936 into the Georgian, Azerbaijan and Armenian republics). Also known as the Soviet Union, the new communist state was the successor to the Russian Empire and the first country in the world to be based on Marxist socialism.
During the Russian Revolution of 1917 and subsequent three-year Russian Civil War, the Bolshevik Party under Vladimir Lenin dominated the soviet forces, a coalition of workers’ and soldiers’ committees that called for the establishment of a socialist state in the former Russian Empire. In the USSR, all levels of government were controlled by the Communist Party, and the party’s politburo, with its increasingly powerful general secretary, effectively ruled the country. Soviet industry was owned and managed by the state, and agricultural land was divided into state-run collective farms.

In the decades after it was established, the Russian-dominated Soviet Union grew into one of the world’s most powerful and influential states and eventually encompassed 15 republics—Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Belorussia, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia. In 1991, the Soviet Union was dissolved following the collapse of its communist government.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

James Gadsden, the U.S. minister to Mexico, and General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, the president of Mexico, sign the Gadsden Purchase in Mexico City. The treaty settled the dispute over the location of the Mexican border west of El Paso, Texas, and established the final boundaries of the southern United States. For the price of $15 million, later reduced to $10 million, the United States acquired approximately 30,000 square miles of land in what is now southern New Mexico and Arizona.
Jefferson Davis, the U.S. secretary of war under President Franklin Pierce, had sent Gadsden to negotiate with Santa Anna for the land, which was deemed by a group of political and industrial leaders to be a highly strategic location for the construction of the southern transcontinental railroad. In 1861, the “big four” leaders of western railroad construction—Collis P. Huntington, Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins and Charles Crocker—established the Southern Pacific branch of the Central Pacific Railroad.
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WORD OF THE DAY

astute; adjective; (uh-STOOT)

What It Means

Astute means "having or showing an ability to notice and understand things clearly"—in other words, "being mentally sharp or clever."

// The coach has proven to be an astute judge of talent during his career.

Examples

"In her new memoir, 'Both/And,' … [Huma Abedin] may be one of the most politically astute and well-traveled women in the world, but she portrays herself as far from worldly, at least in affairs of the heart." — Susan Dominus¸ The New York Times, 21 Nov. 2021

Did You Know?

Astute comes from the Latin noun astus, meaning "craft." The word implies being keenly observant and forming sound judgments based on knowledge and experience.

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

BI District Library Ancestry Workshops 2022

View the schedule of workshops HERE

Holy Cross Bulletin December 2021

View bulletin HERE

From BICOA

Hello,

The Charlevoix County Commission on Aging is a great resource to pick up information on multiple resources to assist the aging. Many of the resources can be found at the Beaver Island C.O.A office or at our senior centers in Charlevoix, East Jordan, and Boyne City. With COVID most of the educational and wellness programs hosted at the COA were paused until our partners were able to offer these safely to clients. I have attached some of the newest programs available to seniors in Charlevoix County. Each flyer contains the information you will need to virtually attend. Any questions about the flyers can be directed to the contact information on the flyers or you may speak to someone from the Charlevoix County Commission on Aging by calling 231-237-0103 or 231-448-2124. We may not have all the answers, but we certainly will do our best to get you to the right people.

May you all have a very happy New Year.

Grace and peace be with you,

Lonnie Allen

Site Coordinator, Beaver Island COA

Charlevoix County Beaver Island

Building coordinator/Maintenance assistant

(231) 448-2124

allenl@charlevoixcounty.org

A Matter of Balance

Cancer Path

Chronic Pain

Diabetes Path

ISLAND CURRENTS

Beaver Island Association Newsletter - Winter 2022

View this file as a PDF HERE

An Almost Disastrous Holiday

by Cindy Ricksgers

Weather by Joe

December 29, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

This morning we have a light dusting of snow on top of the three to four inches from the night before yesterday. The temperature is 31 degrees with a light wind at 1 mph from the SSE. the humidity is 99%. The pressure is 29.71. It's cloudy and visbility is four miles.

TODAY, it is expected to continue with flurries or snow showers. The high will be in the middle 30's. The wind will be from the W at 10 to 15 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for some clouds with a low in the middle 20's. The wind will be from the NNW at 5 to 10 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for cloudy skies with a high near 30 degrees. Winds will be light and variable.
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ON THIS DAY

On December 29, 1890, in one of the final chapters of America’s long Indian wars, the U.S. Cavalry kills 146 Sioux at Wounded Knee on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota.
Throughout 1890, the U.S. government worried about the increasing influence at Pine Ridge of the Ghost Dance spiritual movement, which taught that Native Americans had been defeated and confined to reservations because they had angered the gods by abandoning their traditional customs. Many Sioux believed that if they practiced the Ghost Dance and rejected the ways of the white man, the gods would create the world anew and destroy all non-believers, including non-Indians. On December 15, 1890, reservation police tried to arrest Sitting Bull, the famous Sioux leader, who they mistakenly believed was a Ghost Dancer, and killed him in the process, increasing the tensions at Pine Ridge.
On December 29, the U.S. Army’s 7th cavalry surrounded a band of Ghost Dancers under the Sioux Chief Big Foot near Wounded Knee Creek and demanded they surrender their weapons. As that was happening, a fight broke out between an Indian and a U.S. soldier and a shot was fired, although it’s unclear from which side. A brutal massacre followed, in which it’s estimated almost 150 Native Americans were killed (some historians put this number at twice as high), nearly half of them women and children. The cavalry lost 25 men.
The conflict at Wounded Knee was originally referred to as a battle, but in reality it was a tragic and avoidable massacre. Surrounded by heavily armed troops, it’s unlikely that Big Foot’s band would have intentionally started a fight. Some historians speculate that the soldiers of the 7th Cavalry were deliberately taking revenge for the regiment’s defeat at the Little Bighorn in 1876. Whatever the motives, the massacre ended the Ghost Dance movement and was the last major confrontation in America’s deadly war against the Plains Indians.

Conflict came to Wounded Knee again in February 1973 when it was the site of a 71-day occupation by the activist group AIM (American Indian Movement) and its supporters, who were protesting the U.S. government’s mistreatment of Native Americans. During the standoff, two Native Americans were killed, one federal marshal was seriously wounded and numerous people were arrested.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

On the evening of December 29, 1940, London suffers its most devastating air raid when Germans firebomb the city. Hundreds of fires caused by the exploding bombs engulfed areas of London, but firefighters showed a valiant indifference to the bombs falling around them and saved much of the city from destruction. The next day, a newspaper photo of St. Paul’s Cathedral standing undamaged amid the smoke and flames seemed to symbolize the capital’s unconquerable spirit during the Battle of Britain.
In May and June 1940, Holland, Belgium, Norway, and France fell one by one to the German Wehrmacht, leaving Great Britain alone in its resistance against Nazi leader Adolf Hitler’s plans for world domination. The British Expeditionary Force escaped the continent with an impromptu evacuation from Dunkirk, but they left behind the tanks and artillery needed to defend their homeland against invasion. With British air and land forces outnumbered by their German counterparts, and U.S. aid not yet begun, it seemed certain that Britain would soon follow the fate of France. However, Winston Churchill, the new British prime minister, promised his nation and the world that Britain would “never surrender,” and the British people mobilized behind their defiant leader.
On June 5, the Luftwaffe began attacks on English Channel ports and convoys, and on June 30 Germany seized control of the undefended Channel Islands. On July 10–the first day of the Battle of Britain according to the RAF—the Luftwaffe intensified its bombing of British ports. Six days later, Hitler ordered the German army and navy to prepare for Operation Sea Lion. On July 19, the German leader made a speech in Berlin in which he offered a conditional peace to the British government: Britain would keep its empire and be spared from invasion if its leaders accepted the German domination of the European continent. A simple radio message from Lord Halifax swept the proposal away.
Germany needed to master the skies over Britain if it was to transport safely its superior land forces across the 21-mile English Channel. On August 8, the Luftwaffe intensified its raids against the ports in an attempt to draw the British air fleet out into the open. Simultaneously, the Germans began bombing Britain’s sophisticated radar defense system and RAF-fighter airfields. During August, as many as 1,500 German aircraft crossed the Channel daily, often blotting out the sun as they flew against their British targets. Despite the odds against them, the outnumbered RAF fliers successfully resisted the massive German air invasion, relying on radar technology, more maneuverable aircraft, and exceptional bravery. For every British plane shot down, two Luftwaffe warplanes were destroyed.
At the end of August, the RAF launched a retaliatory air raid against Berlin. Hitler was enraged and ordered the Luftwaffe to shift its attacks from RAF installations to London and other British cities. On September 7, the Blitz against London began, and after a week of almost ceaseless attacks several areas of London were in flames and the royal palace, churches, and hospitals had all been hit. However, the concentration on London allowed the RAF to recuperate elsewhere, and on September 15 the RAF launched a vigorous counterattack, downing 56 German aircraft in two dogfights that lasted less than an hour.
The costly raid convinced the German high command that the Luftwaffe could not achieve air supremacy over Britain, and the next day daylight attacks were replaced with nighttime sorties as a concession of defeat. On September 19, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler postponed indefinitely “Operation Sea Lion”–the amphibious invasion of Britain. The Battle of Britain, however, continued.
In October, Hitler ordered a massive bombing campaign against London and other cities to crush British morale and force an armistice. Despite significant loss of life and tremendous material damage to Britain’s cities, the country’s resolve remained unbroken. The ability of Londoners to maintain their composure had much to do with Britain’s survival during this trying period. As American journalist Edward R. Murrow reported, “Not once have I heard a man, woman, or child suggest that Britain should throw her hand.” In May 1941, the air raids essentially ceased as German forces massed near the border of the USSR.
By denying the Germans a quick victory, depriving them of forces to be used in their invasion of the USSR, and proving to America that increased arms support for Britain was not in vain, the outcome of the Battle of Britain greatly changed the course of World War II. As Churchill said of the RAF fliers during the Battle of Britain, “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”
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WORD OF THE DAY

carte blanche; noun; (KART-BLAHNCH)

Carte blanche is the permission to do something however one chooses to do it.

// The parents granted their children carte blanche to decorate their bedrooms as they wished.

Examples

"'I know you're used to having carte blanche to handle the mission as you see fit, 007. You have your independent streak and it's served you well in the past.' A dark look. 'Most of the time.'"— Jeffery Deaver, Carte Blanche, 2011
.

Did You Know?

Carte blanche is much like a blank check. In French, carte means "document" and blanche means "blank," so the phrase means "blank document." English retained that literal meaning: a carte blanche was a blank document signed in advance by one party and given to the other with permission to fill in conditions later. Much like blank check, carte blanche also took on the extended meaning "complete freedom."

(From Merriam Webster and history dot com)

Munson Healthcare COVID Numbers

December 28, 2021

Beaver Island Christian Church Newsletter

January 2022

10 a.m. SUNDAY SERVICE

 VISITING PASTORS
January 2 – Pastor Josh Johnson
January 9, 16, 23, 30 – Pastor Lee Bracey
 
“Even youths grow tired and weary, and young men stumble and fall; but those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.” 
Isaiah 40 : 30-31
FAITH STEP : Make a list of blessings and gifts that God has given you. Now spend a few minutes praying about how you can freely share those things with others.
WEEKLY EVENTS

Women’s Bible Study in the Sanctuary – Thursday 10 a.m. (not Jan. 6 & 13)

Men’s Coffee – Thursdays at 8:30 - Dalwhinnie’s

BULLETIN ANNOUNCEMENTS

Please send all announcements to be included in the Sunday bulletin by Thursday evening to beaverislandchristianchurch@gmail.com
COOKIE CARNIVAL 

Cookie Carnival 2021 was, once again, a success—thanks to the many volunteers
who so willingly donated their time baking at the Fellowship Center or baked at
home or donated money to pay for supplies—a project like this truly takes a
village!

In our second year of “pre-order only”, the nutmeg logs and party cookies
remained very popular, but this year also saw the addition of new varieties of
goodies.

A very big THANK YOU to all who were involved in this project and to those who
purchased our goodies!!

The amount of profit will be reported in the next newsletter

COFFEE AND COOKIES  

All of us at BICC are cookie people! 
We love our cookies, coffee, and fellowship following the Church service. 

Problem is, not enough of us are signing up to bring cookies and host the coffee fellowship. 

If you’ve thought about it, but weren’t sure what’s involved, please prayerfully consider assisting a
It’s a simple gesture that involves a minimal amount of time, and it’s a great way to meet your fellow Churchgoers.

JOYS, SORROWS, CONCERNS
Our thoughts and prayers for the family of Joe Moore, Lil and Ruthie Gregg. 
Also for the families of the victims of the tragic air crash on Beaver Island, and the Island Airways staff.

A REMINDER THAT BICC WELCOME BAGS ARE AVAILABLE FOR NEW ISLAND RESIDENTS 

The bags contain a welcome letter, information on our Church, and other miscellaneous items (and feel free to add cookies or a baked gift).
This is a nice welcome package for newcomers.  Please see Judi or any member of the Board if you know of someone who you would like to welcome to our Church and the community. 

ENDOWMENT FUND

As you plan your annual giving, please prayerfully consider a donation to the Church Endowment Fund. 

We are simplifying the process by asking that you write your check directly to the church with “Endowment Fund” on the memo line. 

Please send directly to the Church, and Rick Speck will write one check for the combined donations.
Church address: 38215 Kenwabikise Ln, Beaver Island 49782

FOR THOSE WHO HAVE LEFT FOR THE WINTER SEASON, 
“GOD BE WITH YOU, ‘TILL WE MEET AGAIN.”  
If you have usable food items (canned goods, etc.) and plan to leave your cottage for the winter, please consider donating them to the food pantry.

FINAL NOTES:
For additional information about the Church and current events click here to go to:   bichristianchurch.com
We are now including bios for each visiting pastor on the church web site.  If you click on a particular pastor’s name on their appointed Sunday, their bio (if available) will appear.

Health Department of Northwest Michigan COVID-19 Update

December 28, 2021

New quarantine and isolation strategies released by CDC, MDHHS 

Following guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS), the Health Department of Northwest Michigan is adopting the strategy released by the CDC December 27 for quarantine and isolation effective immediately.

According to the CDC news release, given what is currently known about COVID-19 and the Omicron variant, the CDC shortened the recommended time for isolation from 10 days for people with COVID-19 to 5 days, if asymptomatic, followed by 5 days of wearing a mask when around others. The change is motivated by science demonstrating that the majority of SARS-CoV-2 transmission occurs early in the course of the illness, generally in the 1-2 days prior to the onset of symptoms and the 2-3 days after. Therefore, people who test positive should isolate for 5 days and, if asymptomatic at that time, they may leave isolation if they can continue to mask for 5 days to minimize the risk of infecting others.

Additionally, the CDC is updating the recommended quarantine period for those exposed to COVID-19. For those people who are unvaccinated or are more than six months out from their second mRNA dose (or more than 2 months after the J&J vaccine) and not yet boosted, CDC now recommends quarantine for 5 days followed by strict mask use for an additional 5 days. Alternatively, if a 5-day quarantine is not feasible, it is imperative that an exposed person wear a well-fitting mask at all times when around others for 10 days after exposure.

Individuals who have received their booster shot do not need to quarantine following an exposure but should wear a mask for 10 days after the exposure. For all those exposed, best practice would also include a test for SARS-CoV-2 at day 5 after exposure. If symptoms occur, individuals should immediately quarantine until a negative test confirms symptoms are not attributable to COVID-19. Please see this graphic for a summary of the new guidance.

“We know these changes may be confusing and people may have unanswered questions at this time,” said Lisa Peacock, Health Officer for the Health Department of Northwest Michigan. “It will also take the state and local health departments time to update documents on their websites and other printed materials. We ask for the public’s patience as we, too, adapt to these new quarantine and isolation strategies,” she said. “In the meantime, we urge you to make good decisions for your health, and the health of your family and community members.”

Peacock also added that these strategies emphasize the importance of being vaccinated, getting your booster, and wearing a well-fitting mask.

“The key to these new quarantine and isolation strategies released by the CDC is to follow good preventive measures – and that means getting vaccinated including your booster shot, maintaining a safe distance from others, and wearing your mask,” Peacock said.

Isolation refers to behavior after a confirmed infection. Isolation for 5 days followed by wearing a well-fitting mask will minimize the risk of spreading the virus to others.

Quarantine refers to the time following exposure to the virus or close contact with someone known to have COVID-19. Both updates come as the Omicron variant continues to spread throughout the U.S. and reflects the current science on when and for how long a person is maximally infectious.

For a list of vaccine providers and locations in Antrim, Charlevoix, Emmet and Otsego counties, click here. To schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment with the Health Department of Northwest Michigan exclusively for children 5 to 11 years old, click here. To schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment with the health department for anyone 12 and older, click here. A parent/guardian must accompany those younger than 18 to a COVID-19 clinic. Please bring an insurance card to the appointment. Anyone with questions or unable to find a time or date that works for them and/or their child may call the health department at 800-432-4121.

Stay up to date on the latest information in the Health Department of Northwest Michigan jurisdiction by liking and following our Facebook page and visiting our COVID-19 Data Dashboard. To locate a testing facility, visit the Michigan COVID-19 Test Finder website. To track the risk levels of COVID-19 pandemic indicators, visit the MI Safe Start Map website. For more information regarding the COVID-19 vaccine, visit the MDHHS vaccine website or the CDC vaccine website.

View and/or download the document showing this information HERE

CC COA

December 28, 2021

Good Morning,

Just a note to keep you up to date on what is going on with the COA and to respond to requests for more information.  Please find attached the January 2022 Senior Hi-Lites NewsletterShould you have ANY questions about program requirements or qualifications, please contact Lonnie our Site Coordinator on Beaver Island or Sheri Shepard in the COA Office. 

We have had no one this month express interest in the Wellness Check program partnered with the Sheriff’s Department this month.

Our BI Office will be open by appointment only and masks will be required.

Volunteer services will be suspended at this time until the numbers get to a safer level.

Meals and Activities are all subject to change due to the current COVID19 Pandemic numbers, statistics and protective measures for our aging adults and staff.

Please do not come to the Senior Center or offices if you are sick, this includes curbside pick up.  The impact of a sick individual in our centers could shut down services if our staff gets sick and are unable to provide those services.  You can still be sick and spread the COVID19 virus if you are vaccinated.

Please print our Calendars, “Like” our Facebook Page “Charlevoix County Commission on Aging”, follow us on Instagram “Charlevoixcountycoa” and look all the other goings on either on the Senior Hi-Lites Newsletter page or the Menus / Calendars and Activities pages of our website at www.charlevoixcounty/Commission_on_Aging .

Beaver Island COA Office Updates:

The BI COA Office is located at 26466 Donegal Bay Rd will now be open daily with new protocols in place for the safety of those visiting and our staff.  The phone number is 231-448-2124. 

Meal Voucher Program update:

Nutritional Program Participation for the following locations has been approved by the Charlevoix County Commissioners

  • Beaver Island Community School
  • Dalwhinnie Bakery and Deli 
  • The Shamrock

The Bodega – Are in the process of applying for the program.

The Charlevoix Area Support Group

Presented by: Alzheimer’s Association of Michigan

Every Second Thursday of the month

1p – 2:30p

Call Sheri Shepard at 231-237-0103 for more information and Zoom Link if available.

January Sunday Dinner – January 16, 2022

Come one, come all to the Charlevoix County Commission on Aging on Beaver Island Sunday Dinner.  Start off 2022 with a delicious curbside takeout meal from 1-2 p.m. at the Beaver Island Community Center.  Meals are a $6 charge for ages 60 and older & children 11 and younger, and a $10 charge for ages 12-59. Please call 231-448-2124 to reserve one of the 50 meals being prepared.  RSVP by 1/12/2022.  See attached notice.

As a reminder, only Charlevoix County Tax paying residence are allowed to participate in the BI Voucher Meal Program because the taxes that are paid by you and should be used by you.  A big thank you to our participating restaurants who immediately notified us of a couple who fraudulently got vouchers.  This allowed us to make no more were issued.  Please continue to discourage this kind of behavior from your visitors. 

Amy Wieland

Executive Director

Charlevoix County Commission on Aging

Work Phone: 231-237-0103

Email: wielanda@charlevoixcounty.org

Address: 13513 Division Street, Charlevoix, MI  49720

Changing what aging looks like and feels like in Charlevoix County!

View and/or download the January 2022 Highlights HERE

BI COA Information

December 28, 2021

In person activities for Commission on Aging clients are planned to begin in January 2022 at the Beaver Island Community Center. Chair Yoga and Tai Chi are two wellness workshops planned for January. All activities are limited to 10 clients, preregistration is required, and mask will be required to participate. Call 231-448-2124 to register. Bingo is back on Fridays in January. COA Bingo is scheduled Noon-1 p.m. on Fridays beginning in January at the Beaver Island Community Center.

The C.O.A Sunday Dinner is scheduled from 1-2 p.m. on Sunday, January 16, at the Beaver Island Community Center. The dinner is takeout only and people are asked to call 231-448-2124 to reserve a meal. The menu planned is a Baked Spinach Ziti and breadstick; garden salad; fruit cocktail parfait and milk for the beverage. There is a $6 charge for ages 60 and older and children ages 11 and younger. A $10 charge for all other age groups.

National Popcorn Day is on Wednesday, January 19. Everyone is welcome to stop by the Beaver Island Community Center for free popcorn.

For more information about any of the C.O.A January activities please call 231-448-2124.

Grace and peace be with you,

Lonnie Allen

Site Coordinator, Beaver Island COA

Charlevoix County Beaver Island

Building coordinator/Maintenance assistant

(231) 448-2124

allenl@charlevoixcounty.org

January 2022 Dinner Menu

Beaver Island Transit Winter 2022 Hours

CHARLEVOIX COUNTY TRANSIT
BEAVER ISLAND SERVICE

MONDAY - FRIDAY
11:00 AM - 2:00 PM*
*PREMIUM SERVICE IS AVAILABLE OUTSIDE OF POSTED BUSINESS HOURS
(BASED ON DRIVER AVAILABILITY)

FARES:
ADULTS 60+ RIDE FREE (THANK YOU COA)
ADULTS 19-59 $2.00/ONE WAY TRIP
YOUTH 3-18 $1.50/ONE WAY TRIP
DISCOUNTED FARE $1.00/ONE WAY TRIP *CCT REDUCED FARE PAPERWORK MUST BE ON FILE

PREMIUM FARES:
FIRST PASSENGER $5.00/ONE WAY TRIP
EACH ADDITIONAL PASSENGER $3.00/ONE WAY TRIP
*PREMIUM FARES ARE FOR ALL AGE GROUPS/NO DISCOUNTS

To reserve a ride, please call 231.582.6900 between 7:30am-4:30pm.

Medical appointments should be scheduled at least 3 days in advance.
Deliveries should be scheduled at least 1 day in advance.

DELIVERIES CANNOT INTERFERE WITH PASSENGER SERVICE AND WILL BE SCHEDULED WHEN TIME PERMITS.

Weather by Joe

December 28, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

This morning at 7 a.m., we have about four inches on new snow. the temperature is 25 degrees. The wind is from the SSW at 4 mph. The humidity is 98%. The pressure is 29.82. The sky is cloudy with visibility at ten miles.

TODAY, it is expected to be cloudy with a high near 30 degrees. The wind will be from the N at 5 to 10 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for snow showers. Chance of snow is 60%. The low will be just below 30 degrees. The wind will be from the ESE at 5 to 10 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for mainly cloudy skies with snow showers in the morning. Chance of snow is 60%. The high will be in the lower 30's. Wind will be from the WSW at 5 to 10 mph.
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ON THIS DAY

On December 28, 1895, the world’s first commercial movie screening takes place at the Grand Cafe in Paris. The film was made by Louis and Auguste Lumiere, two French brothers who developed a camera-projector called the Cinematographe. The Lumiere brothers unveiled their invention to the public in March 1895 with a brief film showing workers leaving the Lumiere factory. On December 28, the entrepreneurial siblings screened a series of short scenes from everyday French life and charged admission for the first time.
Movie technology has its roots in the early 1830s, when Joseph Plateau of Belgium and Simon Stampfer of Austria simultaneously developed a device called the phenakistoscope, which incorporated a spinning disc with slots through which a series of drawings could be viewed, creating the effect of a single moving image. The phenakistoscope, considered the precursor of modern motion pictures, was followed by decades of advances and in 1890, Thomas Edison and his assistant William Dickson developed the first motion-picture camera, called the Kinetograph. The next year, 1891, Edison invented the Kinetoscope, a machine with a peephole viewer that allowed one person to watch a strip of film as it moved past a light.
In 1894, Antoine Lumiere, the father of Auguste (1862-1954) and Louis (1864-1948), saw a demonstration of Edison’s Kinetoscope. The elder Lumiere was impressed, but reportedly told his sons, who ran a successful photographic plate factory in Lyon, France, that they could come up with something better. Louis Lumiere’s Cinematographe, which was patented in 1895, was a combination movie camera and projector that could display moving images on a screen for an audience. The Cinematographe was also smaller, lighter and used less film than Edison’s technology.
The Lumieres opened theaters (known as cinemas) in 1896 to show their work and sent crews of cameramen around the world to screen films and shoot new material. In America, the film industry quickly took off. In 1896, Vitascope Hall, believed to be the first theater in the U.S. devoted to showing movies, opened in New Orleans. In 1909, The New York Times published its first film review (of D.W. Griffith’s Pippa Passes), in 1911 the first Hollywood film studio opened and in 1914, Charlie Chaplin made his big-screen debut.

In addition to the Cinematographe, the Lumieres also developed the first practical color photography process, the Autochrome plate, which debuted in 1907.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

At dawn, the most destructive earthquake in recorded European history strikes the Straits of Messina in southern Italy, leveling the cities of Messina in Sicily and Reggio di Calabria on the Italian mainland. The earthquake and tsunami it caused killed an estimated 100,000 people.
Sicily and Calabria are known as la terra ballerina–“the dancing land”–for the periodic seismic activity that strikes the region. In 1693, 60,000 people were killed in southern Sicily by an earthquake, and in 1783 most of the Tyrrenian coast of Calabria was razed by a massive earthquake that killed 50,000. The quake of 1908 was particularly costly in terms of human life because it struck at 5:20 a.m. without warning, catching most people at home in bed rather than in the relative safety of the streets or fields.
The main shock, registering an estimated 7.5 magnitude on the Richter scale, caused a devastating tsunami with 40-foot waves that washed over coastal towns and cities. The two major cities on either side of the Messina Straits–Messina and Reggio di Calabria–had some 90 percent of their buildings destroyed. Telegraph lines were cut and railway lines were damaged, hampering relief efforts. To make matters worse, the major quake on the 28th was followed by hundreds of smaller tremors over subsequent days, bringing down many of the remaining buildings and injuring or killing rescuers. On December 30, King Victor Emmanuel III arrived aboard the battleship Napoli to inspect the devastation.
Meanwhile, a steady rain fell on the ruined cities, forcing the dazed and injured survivors, clad only in their nightclothes, to take shelter in caves, grottoes, and impromptu shacks built out of materials salvaged from the collapsed buildings. Veteran sailors could barely recognize the shoreline because long stretches of the coast had sunk several feet into the Messina Strait.
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WORD OF THE DAY

insinuate; verb; (in-SIN-yuh-wayt)

Insinuate means "to imply or suggest in a subtle or indirect way."

// When the teacher questioned the students about their test answers being the same, they knew she was insinuating that they had cheated.

Examples

"Since training camp, Quinn has talked openly about his refreshed mindset and has insinuated he was too hard on himself during his struggles last season. He said a nagging back injury slowed him significantly in 2020 as well." — Dan Wiederer, The Chicago Tribune, 14 Nov. 2021

Did You Know?

Insinuate comes from the Latin root sinuare, meaning "to bend or curve." It is a synonym of imply or suggest; however, insinuate usually conveys something unpleasant is said in a sly or underhanded way.

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

Health Department of Northwest Michigan COVID-19 Update 

December 27, 2021 

Health officials: Get vaccinated, get booster to protect against latest variant  

A statewide goal to have 1 million more Michiganders, including 95% of eligible nursing home residents, receive the safe, effective COVID-19 booster by Jan. 31, 2022, was recently announced by the governor and Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) officials. In addition, actions were outlined for residents to take to keep themselves and their families safe. 

“As Omicron becomes the dominant COVID-19 variant across the U.S., we all should step up to keep ourselves and our loved ones safe," said Lisa Peacock, Health Officer with the Health Department of Northwest Michigan. “I encourage everyone to get vaccinated and to make sure to get your booster shot, which offers a more robust protection against this newest variant,” she added. 

Health officials stress that none of us can predict whether we will get mild or severe symptoms or find ourselves facing long COVID symptoms. Even otherwise healthy and young people can get sick or end up needing care, so it is important that everyone use all of the proven prevention strategies at our disposal. If you are gathering with family, friends or traveling, be extra vigilant, get vaccinated, get tested and wear a mask to keep yourself, your family, and your community safe. 

Actions to take 

·         Get your vaccine. Get your booster. For a list of vaccine providers and locations in Antrim, Charlevoix, Emmet and Otsego counties, click here. To schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment with the Health Department of Northwest Michigan exclusively for children 5 to 11 years old, click here. To schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment with the health department for anyone 12 and older, click here. A parent/guardian must accompany those younger than 18 to a COVID-19 clinic. Please bring an insurance card to the appointment. Anyone with questions or unable to find a time or date that works for them and/or their child may call the health department at 800-432-4121. 

·         Mask up in public indoor settings and crowded outdoor settings. Upgrade your mask to something with additional layers such as a KN95 mask or wear two well-fitting face coverings. 

·         For gatherings with friends or family, people who are immunocompromised should take all precautions, including wearing a well-fitted mask. If a member of your household has a weakened immune system, wear a mask. If you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or if you may have been exposed to COVID-19, and before any unmasked gatherings, get tested. To find a test site in the area, visit http://www.nwhealth.org/covid19main.html

·         Because many of the symptoms of a cold or flu are similar to COVID-19, you are urged to stay home and avoid contacts if you are not feeling well. 

Current statistics 

According to recent data published by MDHHS, Michigan's positivity rate has decreased but remains relatively high at 16.2%, a reflection of our high transmission levels. Cases are at 477 cases per million and have been rising and falling over and over, but at an elevated level. This is a number we expect to rise as the Omicron variant continues to spread rapidly. Over the past month, 30- to 39-year-olds were experiencing the highest case rate and there were increases in hospital admissions among most age groups under 50. The percent of inpatient hospital beds occupied by individuals with COVID is now at 20.8%. This number has been increasing for 22 weeks and the mortality rate is high too - from Dec. 3-9, there were 756 COVID deaths. 

Risks for the unvaccinated 

Statewide data from the month of October showed unvaccinated people had 4.3 times the risk of testing positive for COVID-19 and 13.2 times the risk of dying from COVID-19 than people who were fully vaccinated. From Jan. 3-Dec. 15, 2021, people who were unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated represented 85.1% of COVID-19 cases, 88.1% of hospitalizations and 85.5% of deaths. 

Stay up to date on the latest information in the Health Department of Northwest Michigan jurisdiction by liking and following our Facebook page and visiting our COVID-19 Data Dashboard. To locate a testing facility, visit the Michigan COVID-19 Test Finder website. To track the risk levels of COVID-19 pandemic indicators, visit the MI Safe Start Map website. For more information regarding the COVID-19 vaccine, visit the MDHHS vaccine website or the CDC vaccine website. 

View case counts here

Weather by Joe

December 27, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

At 7:15 a.m. here on Carlisle Road, it is 28 degrees with humidity at 99%. The wind is from the E at 11 mph. The pressure is 29.90. It is cloudy, and visibility is less than one mile.

TODAY, it is expected to be cloudy with snow. Chance of snow is 100%. The high will be 33 degrees. The wind will be out of the ESE at 15 to 25 mph. Accumulation of snow could be up to 3 to 5 inches.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for a windy night with cloudy skies becoming partly cloudy after midnight. The low will be in the upper 20's. The wind will be from the W at 20 to 30 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for cloudy skies with flurries or snow showers later in the day. The high temperature will be in the low 30's. Wind will be from the NNE at 5 to 10 mph.
________________________________
ON THIS DAY
At the height of the Great Depression, thousands turn out for the opening of Radio City Music Hall, a magnificent Art Deco theater in New York City. Radio City Music Hall was designed as a palace for the people, a place of beauty where ordinary people could see high-quality entertainment. Since its 1932 opening, more than 300 million people have gone to Radio City to enjoy movies, stage shows, concerts and special events.
Radio City Music Hall was the brainchild of the billionaire John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who decided to make the theater the cornerstone of the Rockefeller Complex he was building in a formerly derelict neighborhood in midtown Manhattan. The theater was built in partnership with the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) and designed by Donald Deskey. The result was an Art Deco masterpiece of elegance and grace constructed out of a diverse variety of materials, including aluminum, gold foil, marble, permatex, glass, and cork. Geometric ornamentation is found throughout the theater, as is Deskey’s central theme of the “Progress of Man.” The famous Great Stage, measuring 60 feet wide and 100 feet long, resembles a setting sun. Its sophisticated system of hydraulic-powered elevators allowed spectacular effects in staging, and many of its original mechanisms are still in use today.

In its first four decades, Radio City Music Hall alternated as a first-run movie theater and a site for gala stage shows. More than 700 films have premiered at Radio City Music Hall since 1933. In the late 1970s, the theater changed its format and began staging concerts by popular music artists. The Radio City Music Hall Christmas Spectacular, which debuted in 1933, draws more than a million people annually. The show features the high-kicking Rockettes, a precision dance troupe that has been a staple at Radio City since the 1930s.

Also, ON THIS DAY:
Murder and mayhem have been the subject of many popular songs over the years, though more often than not, the tales around which such songs revolve tend to be wholly fictional. Johnny Cash never shot a man in Reno, and the events related in such famous story songs as “El Paso” and “I Shot The Sheriff” never actually took place. The same cannot be said, however, about “Stagger Lee”—a song that has drifted from the facts somewhat over the course of its many lives in the last 100-plus years, but a song inspired by an actual murder that took place on December 27, 1895, in a St. Louis, Missouri, barroom argument involving a man named Billy and another named “Stag” Lee.
Under the headline “Shot in Curtis’s Place,” the story that ran in the next day’s edition of the St. Louis Daily Globe-Democrat began, “William Lyons, 25, colored, a levee hand… was shot in the abdomen yesterday evening at 10 o’clock in the saloon of Bill Curtis… by Lee Sheldon, also colored.” According to the Globe-Democrat’s account, Billy Lyons and “Stag” Lee Sheldon “had been drinking and were in exuberant spirits” when an argument over “politics” boiled over, and Lyons “snatched Sheldon’s hat from his head.” While subsequent musical renditions of this story would depict the dispute as one over gambling, they would preserve the key detail of “Stag” Lee Sheldon’s headwear and of his matter-of-fact response to losing it: “Sheldon drew his revolver and shot Lyons in the abdomen…When his victim fell to the floor Sheldon took his hat from the hand of the wounded man and coolly walked away.”
In his 2003 book Stagolee Shot Billy, based on his earlier doctoral dissertation on the subject, scholar Cecil Brown recounts the story of how the real “Stag” Lee became an iconic figure in African American folklore and how his story became the subject of various musical renderings “from the [age of the] steamboat to the electronic age in the American 21st century.” The most famous of those musical renditions were 1928’s “Stack O’ Lee Blues” by Mississippi John Hurt and 1959’s “Stagger Lee,” an unlikely #1 pop hit for Lloyd Price. Versions of the story have also appeared, however, in songs by artists as wide-ranging as Woody Guthrie, Duke Ellington, Bob Dylan, James Brown, The Clash, the Grateful Dead and Nick Cave.
___________________________________
WORD OF THE DAY

livid; adjective; (LIV-id)

What It Means

Livid means "very angry, enraged, or furious."

// The child's parents were livid when they discovered she had lied about her whereabouts.

Examples

"… consumers … were livid about high gas prices. Gas in some markets topped $4 a gallon." — Beth Musgrave, The Lexington (Kentucky) Herald Leader, 26 May 2011

Did You Know?

Livid has a colorful history. The Latin adjective lividus means "dull, grayish, or leaden blue." From this came the French livide, which English borrowed as livid. The word can describe flesh discolored by a bruise or an appearance deficient in color. Eventually, it came to be used for the complexion of a person pale with anger (i.e., "a person livid with rage"). From this meaning came two new senses: "reddish," as one is as likely to become red with anger as pale; the other was simply "angry" or "furious."

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

Merry, Merry…

by Cindy Ricksgers

White Bird Sunday

December 26, 2021

After church today, a quick trip to the point is always in order.  There were two white swans out in the shallows, but quite a ways away from the car.  As the editor didn't want to scare them away, a couple of quick pictures were taken of them.

Then on the way out of town, a quick check was made on the snowy owl in its very normal location, and it was quite willing to pose for a picture.

Mass from Holy Cross

December 26, 2021

Patrick Nugent did the readings and served. Father Pat read the Gospel and was the celebrant.

View video of this Mass HERE

Search and Rescue

December 25, 2021

At a little after 5:30 p.m. last evening, the evening of Christmas, the fire department, the local EMS, and the Sheriff's Department deputy were all called out to search for a man lost.  This is an unusual way to celebrate this holiday, but one that shows the remarkable efforts by our local public servants.  The search involved the USCG helicopter, and using its infrared search ability, there seemed a posssible success may occur. 

The radio traffic suggested that the helicopter would lift the person up and transport him to the township airport.  The actual occurence is not known by this reporter, but the thanks for our local public servants for their efforts along with the Coast Guard cannot be more obvious.  The facebook post provides the most important information.

"I wanted to give an update on the search and rescue from last night.


My uncle is here with us for the holidays and went for a hike around noon on Christmas after several of us left to go hiking on a different trail. We made it home around 4 and found out he'd been gone several hours. We looked for him where he said he'd be for a short while before calling for emergency (help).


Thankfully, the Coast Guard arrived and thanks to everyone he was found around 7:30. He was quite hypothermic so he was airlifted to Traverse City along with his brother for support. He's doing well now, and I can honestly say that without everyone's help we would have had a much different story on our hands today.


Thank you all so much for your prayers, support, and help! "

(Dan Hicks)

View video of the rescue HERE

(Video Courtesy of USCG Air Station Traverse City)

Weather by Joe

December 26, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

This morning at 7:15 a.m. on Carlisle Road, it is 23 degrees with wind from the NW at 4 mph. The humidity is at 90%. The pressure is 30.09. It is cloudy and visibility is ten miles.

TODAY, it is expected to remain cloudy or partly cloudy with a high in the upper 20's. The wind will be from the NNE at 5 to 10 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for cloudy skies with snow likely later in the evening. Chance of snow is 70%. The low will be in the lower 20's. Winds will be from the E at 10 to 20 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for snow in the morning possibly turning to rain in the afternoon. The chance of precipitation is 80%. The high will be just above freezing. The wind will be from the SE at 15 to 25 mph.
__________________________________

ON THIS DAY

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs a bill officially establishing the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day.
The tradition of celebrating the holiday on Thursday dates back to the early history of the Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies, when post-harvest holidays were celebrated on the weekday regularly set aside as “Lecture Day,” a midweek church meeting where topical sermons were presented. A famous Thanksgiving observance occurred in the autumn of 1621, when Plymouth governor William Bradford invited local members of the Wampanoag tribe to join the Pilgrims in a festival held in gratitude for the bounty of the season.
Thanksgiving became an annual custom throughout New England in the 17th century, and in 1777 the Continental Congress declared the first national American Thanksgiving following the Patriot victory at Saratoga. In 1789, President George Washington became the first president to proclaim a Thanksgiving holiday, when, at the request of Congress, he proclaimed November 26, a Thursday, as a day of national thanksgiving for the U.S. Constitution. However, it was not until 1863, when President Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving to officially fall on the last Thursday of November, that the modern holiday was celebrated nationally.

With a few deviations, Lincoln’s precedent was followed annually by every subsequent president—until 1939. In 1939, Franklin D. Roosevelt departed from tradition by declaring November 23, the next to last Thursday that year, as Thanksgiving Day. Considerable controversy surrounded this deviation, and some Americans refused to honor Roosevelt’s declaration. For the next two years, Roosevelt repeated the unpopular proclamation, but on December 26, 1941, he admitted his mistake and signed a bill into law officially making the fourth Thursday in November the national holiday of Thanksgiving Day.

Also, ON THIS DAY:
On December 26, General George S. Patton employs an audacious strategy to relieve the besieged Allied defenders of Bastogne, Belgium, during the brutal Battle of the Bulge.
The capture of Bastogne was the ultimate goal of the Battle of the Bulge, the German offensive through the Ardennes forest. Bastogne provided a road junction in rough terrain where few roads existed; it would open up a valuable pathway further north for German expansion. The Belgian town was defended by the U.S. 101st Airborne Division, which had to be reinforced by troops who straggled in from other battlefields. Food, medical supplies, and other resources eroded as bad weather and relentless German assaults threatened the Americans’ ability to hold out. Nevertheless, Brigadier General Anthony C. MacAuliffe met a German surrender demand with a typewritten response of a single word: “Nuts.”
Enter “Old Blood and Guts,” General Patton. Employing a complex and quick-witted strategy wherein he literally wheeled his 3rd Army a sharp 90 degrees in a counterthrust movement, Patton broke through the German lines and entered Bastogne, relieving the valiant defenders and ultimately pushing the Germans east across the Rhine.
______________________________
WORD OF THE DAY

Kwanzaa; noun; (KWAHN-zuh)

What It Means

Kwanzaa is an African-American cultural festival held from December 26 to January 1.

// Kwanzaa is celebrated with candle lighting ceremonies.

Examples

"[Marilyn Hemingway] said that more and more people have incorporated Kwanzaa in their celebrations. The seven-day holiday was first celebrated in Los Angeles in 1966 and was founded by scholar, author and activist Maulana Karenga as an alternative to the traditional Christmas holiday as a way to bring the African American community together…." — Roger Yale, The Post & Courier (Charleston, South Carolina), 17 Nov. 2021

Did You Know?

In 1966, Maulana Karenga, a Black Studies professor at California State University at Long Beach, created a new holiday patterned after traditional African harvest festivals. He called it Kwanzaa, a name he took from a Swahili term that means "first fruits." The holiday, which takes place from December 26th to January 1st, was originally intended as a nonreligious celebration of family and social values. Each day of Kwanzaa is dedicated to one of seven principles: unity, self-determination, collective responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith.

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

Christmas Day Mass 2021

December 25, 2021

Leona Pease did the readings, Father Pat read the Gospel and gave the sermon.

View video of the Mass HERE

Christmas Eve Mass 2021

December 24, 2021

Christmas tree and Advent candles

The reader was Joan Banville, the celecbrant Father Pat, the server Pat Nugent

View video of the Mass HERE

Weather by Joe

December 25, 2021

Merry Christmas from Beaver Island!

At 7:30 a.m. here on Carlisle Road, it is 32 degrees with humidity at 99%. The wind is from the N at 2 mph. The pressure is 29.54. It's clear and visibility is at ten miles.

TODAY, it is expected to be partly to mostly cloudy with a high in the middle 30's. The wind will be from the NNW at 10 to 15 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for cloudy skies with a low in the middle 20's. The wind will continue from the NNW at 5 to 10 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for partly cloudy skies with a high in the upper 20's. Wind will be from the N at 5 to 10 mph.
____________________________________

ON THIS DAY

Just after midnight on Christmas morning, the majority of German troops engaged in World War I cease firing their guns and artillery and commence to sing Christmas carols. At certain points along the eastern and western fronts, the soldiers of Russia, France, and Britain even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing.
At the first light of dawn, many of the German soldiers emerged from their trenches and approached the Allied lines across no-man’s-land, calling out “Merry Christmas” in their enemies’ native tongues. At first, the Allied soldiers feared it was a trick, but seeing the Germans unarmed they climbed out of their trenches and shook hands with the enemy soldiers. The men exchanged presents of cigarettes and plum puddings and sang carols and songs. There was even a documented case of soldiers from opposing sides playing a good-natured game of soccer.

The so-called Christmas Truce of 1914 came only five months after the outbreak of war in Europe and was one of the last examples of the outdated notion of chivalry between enemies in warfare. In 1915, the bloody conflict of World War I erupted in all its technological fury, and the concept of another Christmas Truce became unthinkable.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

“White Christmas,” written by the formidable composer and lyricist Irving Berlin receives its world premiere on December 26, 1941 on Bing Crosby’s weekly NBC radio program, The Kraft Music Hall. It went on to become one of the most commercially successful singles of all time, and the top-selling single ever until being surpassed by Elton John’s “Candle in the Wind 1997.”
“White Christmas” took its first steps toward becoming a bedrock standard in the American songbook when Crosby first performed it publicly on Christmas Day, 1941. The song’s success couldn’t have surprised Berlin, who despite having already written such songs as “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” “Cheek To Cheek” and “God Bless America,” had raced into his Manhattan office in January 1940 and asked his musical secretary to transcribe “The best song I ever wrote…the best song anybody ever wrote.” It was nearly two years later, however, that Crosby finally premiered the song on live radio, and a year after that that Crosby’s recording of “White Christmas” became a smash pop hit.
Crosby’s October 1942 recording of “White Christmas” received heavy airplay on Armed Forces Radio as well as on commercial radio during its first Christmas season, becoming an instant #1 pop hit. It also returned to the Hit Parade pop chart in every subsequent Christmas season for the next 20 years. Unlike other perennial holiday hits, however, “White Christmas” strikes a mood that isn’t necessarily jolly. As Jody Rosen, author of the 2002 book White Christmas: The Story of an American Song, told National Public Radio, “It’s very melancholy….And I think this really makes it stand out amongst kind of chirpy seasonal standards [like] ‘Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer’ or ‘Let It Snow.’….I think that’s one of the reasons why people keep responding to it, because our feelings over the holiday season are ambivalent.”
This was certainly true of the immigrant Russian Jewish songwriter Irving Berlin. Though he did not celebrate Christmas, it was a day that held special meaning to Berlin, who had spent each Christmas Day visiting the grave of his late son, Irving Berlin, Jr., who died at just 3 weeks old on December 25, 1928. As Jody Rosen has suggested about a beloved song of great emotional complexity, “The kind of deep secret of [“White Christmas”] may be that it was Berlin responding in some way to his melancholy about the death of his son.”
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WORD OF THE DAY

jubilate; verb; (JOO-buh-layt)

What It Means

Jubilate means "to feel joy or great delight." It is an old-fashioned synonym of rejoice that still brings a smile to those who encounter it.

// Supporters of the mayoral candidate jubilated when his victory was officially announced.

Examples

"If the Yankees were in no mood to watch the Red Sox jubilate, a glance at the scoreboard didn't help matters." — Billy Witz, The New York Times, 21 Sept. 2018

Did You Know?

When things are going your way, you may want to shout for joy—or to jubilate. The joyful source of jubilate is Latin jubilare, which means "to shout for joy."

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

Beaver Island Christmas Lights

December 23, 2021

The highlight of the Christms Lights in town.

This year the lights' pictures were taken in order from the Kings Highway and Carlisle Road to Whiskey Point and then a few side trips on the back roads back to Kings Highway out to the Four Corners.  The pictures were taken from the car to provide the exact view that someone might get by driving around the town area to view the lights.  The island is certainly decked out for the Christmas season!

View a gallery of photos HERE

Video of the lights HERE

Weather by Joe

December 24, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island on Christmas Eve morning!

Right now on Carlisle Road at 7:30 a.m., it is 32 degrees with humidity at 99%. The wind is from the S at 2 mph. The pressure is 29.76. It is cloudy and visibility is at 5 miles.

TODAY, it is expected to be cloudy with light rain in the afternoon and with a possibility of freezing rain as well. Chance of rain is 70%. The wind will be from the SE at 10 to 20 mph. The high will be near 40 degrees.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for cloudy skies with light rain this evening. The chance of rain is 70%. The low will be just below freezing. The S winds will switch to the NW at 10 to 15 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for mostly cloudy skies with a high in the middle 30's. The wind will be from the NNW at 10 to 15 mph.
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ON THIS DAY

The Treaty of Peace and Amity between His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America is signed by British and American representatives at Ghent, Belgium, ending the War of 1812. By terms of the treaty, all conquered territory was to be returned, and commissions were planned to settle the boundary of the United States and Canada.
In June 1812, the United States declared war against Great Britain in reaction to three issues: the British economic blockade of France, the induction of thousands of neutral American seamen into the British Royal Navy against their will, and the British support of Native American tribes along the Great Lakes frontier. A faction of Congress, made up mostly of western and southern congressmen, had been advocating the declaration of war for several years. These “War Hawks,” as they were known, hoped that war with Britain, which was preoccupied with its struggle against Napoleonic France, would result in U.S. territorial gains in Canada and British-protected Florida.
In the months following the U.S. declaration of war, American forces launched a three-point invasion of Canada, all of which were repulsed. At sea, however, the United States was more successful, and the USS Constitution and other American frigates won a series of victories over British warships. In 1813, American forces won several key victories in the Great Lakes region, but Britain regained control of the sea and blockaded the eastern seaboard.
In 1814, with the downfall of Napoleon, the British were able to allocate more military resources to the American war, and Washington, D.C., fell to the British in August. In Washington, British troops burned the White House, the Capitol, and other buildings in retaliation for the earlier burning of government buildings in Canada by U.S. soldiers. The British soon retreated, however, and Fort McHenry in Baltimore harbor withstood a massive British bombardment and inspired Francis Scott Key to pen the “Star-Spangled Banner.”
On September 11, 1814, the tide of the war turned when Thomas Macdonough’s American naval force won a decisive victory at the Battle of Plattsburg Bay on Lake Champlain. A large British army under Sir George Prevost was thus forced to abandon its invasion of the U.S. northeast and retreat to Canada. The American victory on Lake Champlain led to the conclusion of U.S.-British peace negotiations in Belgium, and on December 24, 1814, the Treaty of Ghent was signed, ending the war. Although the treaty said nothing about two of the key issues that started the war–the rights of neutral U.S. vessels and the impressment of U.S. sailors–it did open up the Great Lakes region to American expansion and was hailed as a diplomatic victory in the United States.

News of the treaty took almost two months to cross the Atlantic, and British forces were not informed of the end of hostilities in time to end their drive against the mouth of the Mississippi River. On January 8, 1815, a large British army attacked New Orleans and was decimated by an inferior American force under General Andrew Jackson in the most spectacular U.S. victory of the war. The American public heard of the Battle of New Orleans and the Treaty of Ghent at approximately the same time, fostering a greater sentiment of self-confidence and shared identity throughout the young republic.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

On December 24, 1923, President Calvin Coolidge touches a button and lights up the first national Christmas tree to grace the White House grounds.
Not only was this the first White House “community” Christmas tree, but it was the first to be decorated with electric lights—a strand of 2,500 red, white and green bulbs. The balsam fir came from Coolidge’s home state of Vermont and stood 48 feet tall. Several musical groups performed at the tree-lighting ceremony, including the Epiphany Church choir and the U.S. Marine Band. Later that evening, President Coolidge and first lady Grace were treated to carols sung by members of Washington, D.C.’s First Congregational Church.
According to the White House Historical Association, President Benjamin Harrison was the first president to set up an indoor Christmas tree for his family and visitors to enjoy in 1889. It was decorated with ornaments and candles. In 1929, first lady Lou Henry Hoover oversaw what would become an annual tradition of decorating the indoor White House tree. Since then, each first lady’s duties have included the trimming of the official White House tree.
Coolidge’s “inauguration” of the first outdoor national Christmas tree initiated a tradition that has been repeated with every administration. In 1981, President Ronald Reagan began another custom by authorizing the first official White House ornament, copies of which were made available for purchase.
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WORD OF THE DAY

adventitious; adjective; (ad-ven-TISH-us)

What It Means

Adventitious means "coming from another source," and it is used in formal writing. In botany, it means "arising or occurring sporadically in other than the usual location."
// In his biography, the artist states that most of his ideas came from within and were not adventitious.

// The tomato plant forms adventitious roots along its stem.

Examples

"Adventitious roots are roots that form on plant organs like stems, leaves and nodes of the plant. These roots are the ones that reach out to anchor the plant as well as find water and nutrients." — Campbell Vaughn, The Augusta (Georgia) Chronicle, 28 Jan. 2021

Did You Know?

Adventitious comes from Latin adventīcius, meaning "coming from outside," which, in turn, is from advenīre, "to arrive." The verb is the source of other English words, including advent, adventure, and avenue.

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

Snowy Owl

December 23, 2021

While keeping track of the snowy owl visits to Beaver Island over the years, there seems to be a pattern of them staying in the harbor area.  Some years there are more than one snowy owl, and others only have one that is seen in this same area.  The owls seem to stay in the harbor area for most of the winter, but there is no true factual tracking of these birds, just visual clues.  Here are two different owls in two different locations on the same day of the last two years, but both in the same general area of Paradise Bay.

12/22/20........................12/22/21

Weather by Joe

December 23, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

This morning at 7 a.m. here on Carlisle Road, it is 23 degrees with no wind. The humidity is 95%. The pressure is 29.95. It is cloudy and visibility is ten miles.

TODAY it is expected to be cloudy with snow showers developing in the afternoon. The high temperature should be near freezing. The chance of snow is 60%. The wind will be from the SSE at 5 to 10 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for pretty much the same as the day with the low around 30 degrees and the wind switching to the SE. Same chance of snow.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for cloudy skies with light rain possibly mixed with snow. The chance of rain is 70%. The high will be near 40 degrees. winds will be from the SE at 10 to 15 mph.
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ON THIS DAY

On December 23, 1888, Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh, suffering from severe depression, cuts off the lower part of his left ear with a razor while staying in Arles, France. He later documented the event in a painting titled Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear. Today, Van Gogh is regarded as an artistic genius and his masterpieces sell for record-breaking prices; however, during his lifetime, he was a poster boy for tortured starving artists and sold only one painting.
Vincent Willem van Gogh was born on March 30, 1853, in the Netherlands. He had a difficult, nervous personality and worked unsuccessfully at an art gallery and then as a preacher among poor miners in Belgium. In 1880, he decided to become an artist. His work from this period–the most famous of which is The Potato Eaters (1885)–is dark and somber and reflective of the experiences he had among peasants and impoverished miners.
In 1886, Van Gogh moved to Paris where his younger brother Theo, with whom he was close, lived. Theo, an art dealer, supported his brother financially and introduced him to a number of artists, including Paul Gauguin, Camille Pisarro and Georges Seurat. Influenced by these and other painters, Van Gogh’s own artistic style lightened up and he began using more color.
In 1888, Van Gogh rented a house in Arles in the south of France, where he hoped to found an artists’ colony and be less of a burden to his brother. In Arles, Van Gogh painted vivid scenes from the countryside as well as still-lifes, including his famous sunflower series. Gauguin came to stay with him in Arles and the two men worked together for almost two months. However, tensions developed and on December 23, in a fit of dementia, Van Gogh threatened his friend with a knife before turning it on himself and mutilating his ear lobe.
Afterward, he allegedly wrapped up the ear and gave it to a prostitute at a nearby brothel. Following that incident, Van Gogh was hospitalized in Arles and then checked himself into a mental institution in Saint-Remy for a year. During his stay in Saint-Remy, he fluctuated between periods of madness and intense creativity, in which he produced some of his best and most well-known works, including Starry Night and Irises.

In May 1890, Van Gogh moved to Auvers-sur-Oise, near Paris, where he continued to be plagued by despair and loneliness. On July 27, 1890, he shot himself and died two days later at age 37.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

One week after the Mayflower docks at Plymouth harbor in present-day Massachusetts, construction of the first permanent European settlement in New England begins.
On September 16, the Mayflower departed Plymouth, England, bound for the New World with 102 passengers. The ship was headed for Virginia, where the colonists—half religious dissenters and half entrepreneurs—had been authorized to settle by the British crown. In a difficult Atlantic crossing, the 90-foot Mayflower encountered rough seas and storms and was blown more than 500 miles off course.
Along the way, the settlers formulated and signed the Mayflower Compact, an agreement that bound the signatories into a “civil body politic.” Because it established constitutional law and the rule of the majority, the compact is regarded as an important precursor to American democracy. After a 66-day voyage, the ship landed on November 21 at the tip of Cape Cod at what is now Provincetown, Massachusetts.
After coming to anchor in Provincetown harbor, a party of armed men under the command of Captain Myles Standish was sent out to explore the area and find a location suitable for settlement. While they were gone, Susanna White gave birth to a son, Peregrine, aboard the Mayflower. He was the first English child born in New England. In mid-December, the explorers went ashore at a location across Cape Cod Bay where they found cleared fields and plentiful running water, and they named the site Plymouth. The expedition returned to Provincetown, and on December 21 the Mayflower came to anchor in Plymouth harbor. Two days later, the pilgrims began work on dwellings that would shelter them through their difficult first winter in America.
In the first year of settlement, half the colonists died of disease. In 1621, the health and economic condition of the colonists improved, and that autumn Governor William Bradford invited neighboring Indians to Plymouth to celebrate the bounty of that year’s harvest season. Plymouth soon secured treaties with most local Indian tribes, and the economy steadily grew, and more colonists were attracted to the settlement. By the mid-1640s, Plymouth’s population numbered 3,000 people, but by then the settlement had been overshadowed by the larger Massachusetts Bay Colony to the north, settled by Puritans in 1629.
The term “Pilgrim” was not used to describe the Plymouth colonists until the early 19th century and was derived from a manuscript in which Governor Bradford spoke of the “saints” who traveled to the New World as “pilgrimes.” In 1820, the orator Daniel Webster spoke of “Pilgrim Fathers” at a bicentennial celebration of Plymouth’s founding, and thereafter the term entered common usage.
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WORD OF THE DAY

paucity; noun; (PAW-suh-tee)

Paucity implies smallness of number or quantity.

// There was a paucity of detail in the report.

Examples

"... sparse transit service and a paucity of bicycle lanes often leave automobiles as the only, not necessarily the preferred, transportation option." — David Zipper, The Daily Herald (Everett, Washington), 25 Oct. 2021

Did You Know?

Paucity refers to "littleness" in numbers (as in "a paucity of facts") or quantity ("a paucity of common sense"). The word comes from paucus, Latin for "little."

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

Beaver Island Community School Weekly Update

Tuesday, December 21, 2021

Happy Holidays

There was a lot of holiday spirit running through the school today--reading holiday stories, field trips, pajamas, and the final Secret Santa reveal at the secondary level! Thanks to all the parents who brought in treats for staff and students (I'm pretty sure I gained five pounds in the last two days) and for the Elks for their great Power Book Bags and for the Community Center for their gingerbread house kits. Happy Holidays to Everyone!

SAVE YOUR RETURNABLES

Due to space constraints the Beaver Island Transfer Station is currently not collecting returnable cans and plastic bottles for the school fundraiser...but they will be resuming collection in January. In the meantime, please save your returnable aluminum cans and plastic bottles while the Transfer Station staff figures out the best way to collect them. Please empty and rinse your cans and plastic bottles and store them in a cardboard box or paper bags (they can get stinky in plastic bags). Also, when you do take them to the transfer station, make sure they are not mixed with any garbage or other recyclable items such as tin cans, glass bottles, or non-returnable plastic drink containers. Thank you for saving your returnables--Islanders donated over 130,000 cans last year! That's over $13,000 that went to help our sports teams, field trips, and other extracurricular activities! Please note, due to the processing requirements of our vendors, we are not able to process beverage bottles for our fundraiser. As well, returnable aluminum cans are the most efficient for processing and transporting. So, if you "can," purchase your beverages in aluminum cans. Thank You!

BIRHC Vaccination Dates

In response to parents’ and Islanders requesting to get vaccinated ASAP in the face of the Omicron variant, the Beaver Island Rural Health Center is scheduling several vaccination clinics over the holidays. Because the dosage is slightly different for those who are under 12, and the boosters are available for those who are 16 and older, please note the different days for each category. In order to get your vaccine, please contact the Beaver Island Rural Health Center at (231) 448-2275 to schedule your appointment.

·         Weds, 12/22/21 (1st dose for 12-15; booster or 1st dose for 16 and older)

·         Tues, 12/28/21 (1st dose for 12-15; booster or 1st dose for 16 and older)

·         Weds, 12/29/21 (1st dose for 12-15; booster or 1st dose for 16 and older)

·         Tuesday, 1/11/22 (2nd dose for 5-11 years (but 1st dose welcome too!))

Parents—please note that the HDNW has not planned another vaccination clinic at the school for the foreseeable future. Thank you BIRHC for making this very convenient option available for our students to get vaccinated and for our Island residents to get boosted!

It's Still December

‘Tis the season of giving…and an Island Elf has worked a deal with Dalwhinnie’s Deli for Beaver Island’s students! During the month of December, any BICS student may receive one free breakfast or dinner compliments of our own Beaver Island Elf! Thank you!

Smile...it will Soon Be February

Thanks to a collaboration between the BIRHC, the Elks, and Dental Clinics North, as well as private contributions, all children on the Island will be able to have a free dental exam, dental x-rays, and cleaning. We will have more details regarding scheduling in early January...but for now, if you are planning dental care for your children, know there is a planned clinic in February to ensure that our students have big grins!  See the Health Center's website for more information on their Big Grins initiative: https://www.biruralhealth.org

BICS Holiday Break

Whew!  2021 has been a doozy--with the ups and downs of navigating BICS through the changing waters of this pandemic. As I reflect on the past year, all I can say is that the BICS faculty and staff were only able to ensure that Beaver Island was a great place to learn due to the great support of our parents and community. On behalf of the school board, teachers, and support staff, thank you. Have a wonderful time celebrating the season with your friends and family. We look forward with hopeful optimism toward the New Year. We will be back to school on Monday, January 3, 2022.

Happy Holidays!

Stay Safe and Healthy!

Wilfred Cwikiel, Superintendent-Principal
Beaver Island Community School
(231) 448-2744

Weather by Joe

December 22, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

Here on Carlisle Road at 7:30 a.m., it is 19 degrees. The humidity is 94%. The wind is from the W at 7 mph. The pressure is 28,71. The sky is cloudy with visibility at 5 miles.

TODAY, it is expected to be quite cloudy with a few snow flurries possible this morning. The high will be in the lower 20's. The wind will be from the WNW at 15 to 25 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for considerable cloudiness with a low near 20 degrees. The wind will continue from the WNW at 5 to 10 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for snow accumulating to one inch. There is a 60% chance of snow. The high will be near freezing. The wind will switch to the SSE at 5 to 10 mph.
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ON THIS DAY

Beethoven's Fifth Symphony Debuts in Vienna

If the initial reviews failed to recognize it as one of the greatest pieces of music ever written, one needs to understand the adverse conditions under which the work was first heard. The concert venue was freezing cold; it was more than two hours into a mammoth four-hour program before the piece began; and the orchestra played poorly enough that day to force the nearly deaf composer—also acting as conductor and pianist—to stop the ensemble partway into one passage and start again from the very beginning. It was, all in all, a very inauspicious beginning for what would soon become the world’s most recognizable piece of classical music: Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 in C Minor, Op. 67—the “Fifth Symphony”—which received its world premiere on December 22, 1808.
Also premiering that day at the Theater an der Wien in Vienna were Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, and the Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68—the “Pastoral Symphony.” But it was the Fifth Symphony that, despite its shaky premiere, would eventually be recognized as Beethoven’s greatest achievement to that point in his career. Writing in 1810, the critic E.T.A. Hoffman praised Beethoven for having outstripped the great Haydn and Mozart with a piece that “opens the realm of the colossal and immeasurable to us…evokes terror, fright, horror, and pain, and awakens that endless longing that is the essence of Romanticism.”

That assessment would stand the test of time, and the Fifth Symphony would quickly become a centerpiece of the classical repertoire for orchestras around the world. But beyond its revolutionary qualities as a serious composition, the Fifth Symphony has also proven to be a work with enormous pop-cultural staying power, thanks primarily to its powerful four-note opening motif—three short Gs followed by a long E-flat. Used in World War II-era Britain to open broadcasts of the BBC because it mimicked the Morse-code “V” for “Victory,” and used in the disco-era United States by Walter Murphy as the basis for his unlikely #1 pop hit “A Fifth Of Beethoven,” the opening notes of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony have become a kind of instantly recognizable musical shorthand since they were first heard by the public.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

12/22/1917

A week after the armistice was signed between Russia and Germany and nearly three weeks after a ceasefire was declared on the Eastern Front, representatives of the two countries begin peace negotiations at Brest-Litovsk, near the Polish border in what is now the city of Brest, in Belarus.
The leader of the Russian delegation was Leon Trotsky, the Bolshevik People’s Commissar for Foreign Relations. Max Hoffmann, the commander of German forces on the Eastern Front, served as one of the chief negotiators on the German side. The main difference of opinion in Brest-Litovsk was over cessation of Russian land to the Germans—the Russians demanded a peace without annexations or indemnities and the Germans were unwilling to concede on this point. In February 1918, Trotsky announced he was withdrawing the Russians from the peace talks, and the war was on again.
Unfortunately for Russia, with the renewal of fighting the Central Powers quickly took the upper hand, seizing control of most of Ukraine and Belarus. The Bolshevik hope that the workers of Germany and Austria, offended by their governments’ naked territorial ambition, would rise up in rebellion in the name of the international proletariat soon vanished. On March 3, 1918, Russia accepted peace terms even harsher than those originally suggested, losing Poland, Lithuania, and the Baltic states of Estonia, Livonia, and Courland to Germany. Meanwhile, Finland and the Ukraine saw Russia’s weakness as an opportunity to declare their independence. In all, Brest-Litovsk deprived Lenin’s new state of one million square miles of territory and one-third of its population, or 55 million people.
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WORD OF THE DAY

benign; adjective; (bih-NYNE)

What It Means

Benign means "not causing harm or injury." In medicine, it refers to tumors that are not cancerous.

// The email seemed benign, but it was discovered to be from a hacker.

// The tumor was benign.

Examples

"Today all apps and software, no matter how benign they appear, are designed to maximize data collection." — Shoshana Zuboff, The New York Times, 14 Nov. 2021

Did You Know?

Benign comes from Latin benignus, which was formed from bene, meaning "well," and gignere, "to beget." Gignere is the root of such English words as genius and germ.

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

From the Catholic Diocese of Gaylord

New Bishop Announced

Holiday Hours for BIRHC

Big Grins at the Island Health Center

December 21, 2021

 

Beaver Island’s Elks Lodge #2886, one of The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks newest lodges, has awarded the Beaver Island Rural Health Center a $3,000 grant.  “We are beyond grateful,” said Ann Partridge, Acting Managing Director of the Health Center when she was advised of the award.”  Partridge was one of several Center personnel and supporters involved in the Good Samaritan Dental Project. 

The $3,000 grant moved the Center’s Good Samaritan Fund one step closer to activating its dental initiative.  The Good Samaritan Fund will oversee the opportunity for all enrolled Community School students to have a free dental exam, x-ray and cleaning. 

East Side resident Nadra Johnson quickly made the project a reality by matching the Elks grant.  The Johnson Family has a tradition of involvement in the Center's Good Samaritan Fund. Johnson, upon learning of the Elks award said, “Insuring island youth have access to proper dental care can be truly life-changing. Good dental care and habits can improve the overall health and self-esteem of an individual. This is such a meaningful project. I’m so happy for the Center and island youth.  How could I not support such a worthwhile project?” 

Lori Taylor-Blitz, a member of the Health Center Board of Directors and a member of local Elks Lodge #2886 noted the Elks mission is to invest in their communities through programs that help children grow up healthy and drug-free, meet the needs of today’s veterans, and improve the quality of life. The Elks are always looking for appropriate ways to give back to the community.  I know our membership is delighted to demonstrate our value to the community by participating in such a unique project.”  

The free dental exam, x-rays and cleaning will be done on the island by the Dental Clinics North clinicians.  DCN operates a clinic within the Island's Rural Health Center complex. Ann Partridge indicated the project is expected to commence in February of 2022.

The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks has made more than 12 Billion in donations since they first started 153 years ago. The Elks annually donate millions in cash, gifts, and time to make communities better places to live.

Dental Clinics North is a partnership of local health departments located in Northern Michigan.  Dental Clinics North has ten offices throughout northern Michigan.

Weather by Joe

December 21, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

At 7:15 am. here on Carlisle Road, it is 20 degrees with no wind. The humidity is at 87%. The pressure is 30.07. It is cloudy with visibility of ten miles.

TODAY, it is expected to be cloudy with snow likely this afternoon. Chance of snow is given as 100%. The accumulation will be 1 to 3 inches. The wind will be from the SSE at 10 to 15 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for cloudy skies and windy with snow showers. Chance of snow is 60%. The wind will be from the WNW at 20 to 30 mph. The low will be near 20 degrees.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for mostly cloudy skies with snow flurries likely. The high will be in the middle 20's. The wind will continue from the WNW at 10 to 20 mph.
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ON THIS DAY

On December 21, 1891, 30-year-old James Naismith introduces the first game of basketball. Based on 13 rules created by Naismith, the game is tested by 18 students at the International Young Men’s Christian Association Training School in Springfield, Massachusetts. Two teams of nine players each compete against each other, with the objective to throw a soccer ball into a peach basket attached to a balcony 10 feet above the floor.
In the early 1890s, Naismith—who was born in Canada—moved on from his job in Montreal as McGill University's athletic director to become a physical education teacher at the YMCA International Training School. Bored and unruly students needed an activity during difficult New England winters. So, Naismith took up another teacher's challenge to keep students in line.
“I called the boys to the gym, divided them up into teams of nine and gave them a little soccer ball,” Naismith recalled in a 1939 radio interview that aired on WOR-AM in New York City. “I showed them two peach baskets I’d nailed up at each end of the gym, and I told them the idea was to throw the ball into the opposing team’s peach basket. I blew the whistle, and the first game of basketball began.”
A jump ball was held after each made basket.
"The invention of basketball was not an accident," Naismith said. "It was developed to meet a need. Those boys simply would not play 'Drop the Handkerchief.'"
Under two different sets of rules, the first organized collegiate basketball games were played in the mid-1890s.

Naismith, who died in 1939, became the first basketball coach at Kansas University, where he led the Jayhawks from 1898-1907.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

Determined to challenge the growing American military presence in their territory, Native Americans in northern Wyoming lure Lieutenant Colonel William Fetterman and his soldiers into a deadly ambush on December 21, 1866.
Tensions in the region started rising in 1863, when John Bozeman blazed the Bozeman Trail, a new route for emigrants traveling to the Montana gold fields. Bozeman’s trail was of questionable legality since it passed directly through hunting grounds that the government had promised to the Sioux, Cheyenne and Arapahoe in the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851. Thus when Colorado militiamen massacred more than two hundred peaceful Cheyenne during the Sand Creek Massacre of 1864, the Native Americans began to take revenge by attacking whites all across the Plains, including the emigrants traveling the Bozeman Trail. The U.S. government responded by building a series of protective forts along the trail; the largest and most important of these was Fort Phil Kearney, erected in 1866 in north-central Wyoming.
Native Americans under the leadership of Red Cloud and Crazy Horse began to focus their attacks on Fort Phil Kearney, constantly harassing the soldiers and raiding their wood and supply parties. On December 6, 1866, Crazy Horse discovered to his surprise that he could lead a small detachment of soldiers into a fatal ambush by dismounting from his horse and fleeing as if he were defenseless. Struck by the foolish impulsiveness of the soldiers, Crazy Horse and Red Cloud reasoned that perhaps a much larger force could be lured into a similar deadly trap.
On the bitterly cold morning of December 21, about 2,000 Natives concealed themselves along the road just north of Fort Phil Kearney. A small band made a diversionary attack on a party of woodcutters from the fort, and commandant Colonel Henry Carrington quickly ordered Colonel Fetterman to go to their aid with a company of 80 troopers. Crazy Horse and 10 decoy warriors then rode into view of the fort. When Carrington fired an artillery round at them, the decoys ran away as if frightened. The party of woodcutters made it safely back to the fort, but Colonel Fetterman and his men chased after the fleeing Crazy Horse and his decoys, just as planned. The soldiers rode straight into the ambush and were wiped out in a massive attack during which some 40,000 arrows rained down on the hapless troopers. None of them survived.
With 81 fatalities, the Fetterman Massacre was the army’s worst defeat in the West until the Battle of Little Bighorn in 1876. Further attacks eventually forced the army to reconsider its commitment to protecting the Bozeman Trail, and in 1868 the military abandoned the forts and pulled out. It was one of only a handful of clear Native American victories in the Plains Indian Wars.
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WORD OF THE DAY

exasperate; verb; (ig-ZASS-puh-rayt)

What It Means

Exasperate means "to cause irritation or annoyance to someone" or "to excite the anger of someone."

// The flight delays began to exasperate people in the airport.

Examples

"His suggestions sometimes exasperate the garden designers, who have their own vision of where things should be." — Jeanette Marantos, The Los Angeles Times, 6 Nov. 2021

Did You Know?

Exasperate comes from Latin exasperare, whose base, asper, means "rough." A relative of asper is asperity, which can refer to the roughness of a surface or the roughness of someone's temper. Another is spurn, meaning "to reject."

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

COVID Update from NW Michigan Health

December 20, 2021

Dr. Josh Meyerson, Medical Director with the Health Department of Northwest Michigan, was the first recipient of the COVID-19 vaccine on December 17, 2020. Since then, health department staff have administered more than 61,000 vaccines across its four-county jurisdiction. 

Case Counts

1 year later: Health Department administered more than 61,000 COVID vaccines

It has been one year since the first COVID-19 vaccine was administered by Health Department of Northwest Michigan officials and since then, more than 129,000 doses have been provided to area residents in the four-county jurisdiction by all vaccination providers. 

As of December 18, the health department has given 61,424 of those COVID-19 doses across its service area of Antrim, Charlevoix, Emmet and Otsego counties.  

“I was privileged to be among the first immunized and am overwhelmed with gratitude to our staff for administering these life-saving shots, and to all those residents across our region who have rolled up their sleeves for the vaccine,” said Dr. Josh Meyerson, Medical Director with the health department. 

With Christmas just days away and many of us traveling, Dr. Meyerson reminds us we are once again seeing high rates of community transmission for COVID-19 that inevitably leads to exposures in our households, social groups, and workplaces. 

“Although fully vaccinated individuals are far less likely to be infected than unvaccinated, we are seeing many cases in vaccinated persons. Although these cases tend to be very mild, the infected individual can spread the virus to close contacts, especially in their household and to those they spend a lot of time with,” Dr. Meyerson said. “The Delta strain that now predominates has proven to be far more contagious than the previous strains encountered last winter and spring, and the latest variant of concern, Omicron, that will likely soon predominate in our area is even more contagious, even in the vaccinated.”  

So how do we navigate through this as community members? 

  1. Vaccination is still the best tool we have to moderate the impact of this pandemic. Vaccines protect us from severe disease. Booster doses have shown to further reduce the risk of disease and reduce infection rates. Everyone is encouraged to get vaccinated, including your booster dose, as soon as you are eligible. 
  2. Continue to practice mitigation measures including masking at work/school and indoor public places. 
  3. Stay home if you have symptoms such as chills, fever, or mild respiratory/flu-like illness. Get tested and return to work/school/socialization once your test is negative and you’re feeling better. 
  4. If you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 (i.e., a close contact) take precautions even if you are vaccinated or otherwise do not need to quarantine. These include self-monitoring for signs of illness, limiting your social gatherings, always wearing a mask while at work and other indoor settings, and getting tested 4-6 days after exposure. Household exposures are the highest risk for infection, followed by those in close contact for prolonged periods while unmasked at work, while eating, or in athletic or other indoor activities where there is close contact. Please be extra cautious to reduce close contact if you are a confirmed close contact as you are at high risk for getting COVID-19. 

“All of us must decide what risk is acceptable when choosing activities to attend. With holiday gatherings upon us everyone must consider not only their own health but the health and safety of their friends and relatives, including those they may care for and those they may visit,” Dr. Meyerson said. “We all need to balance the desire to 'be careful' with the need for social interaction and time with loved ones,” he said, adding he wishes everyone a warm, healthy, and happy holiday. 

COVID-19 vaccinations – including booster shots – are widely available at pharmacies, health care providers and health department clinics. For a list of vaccine providers and locations in Antrim, Charlevoix, Emmet and Otsego counties, click here. To schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment with the Health Department of Northwest Michigan exclusively for children 5 to 11 years old, click here. To schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment with the health department for anyone 12 and older, click here. A parent/guardian must accompany anyone younger than 18 to a COVID-19 clinic. Please bring an insurance card to the appointment. Anyone with questions or unable to find a time or date that works for them and/or their child may call the health department at 800-432-4121. 

To find a test site in the area, visit http://www.nwhealth.org/covid19main.html

Stay up to date on the latest information in the Health Department of Northwest Michigan jurisdiction by liking and following our Facebook page and visiting our COVID-19 Data Dashboard. To locate a testing facility, visit the Michigan COVID-19 Test Finder website. To track the risk levels of COVID-19 pandemic indicators, visit the MI Safe Start Map website. For more information regarding the COVID-19 vaccine, visit the MDHHS vaccine website or the CDC vaccine website. 

Peaine Township Special Meeting

December 20, 2021

Present were the treasurer, the clerk, and the supervisor

Missing were the two trustees; Ernie and Travis Martin

View the packet for the meeting HERE

View video of the meeting HERE

Emerald Island Last Trip of the Season

December 20, 2021

December 29, 2021, is the last official date of the running of the Emerald Isle ferry for the 2021 season.  This also happens to coincide with the last trip of ferry as captained by Mike Green.  The pictures of the boat leaving Charlevoix are property of Kali Delamater and used with permission.

It appeared clear in Charlevoix as the Emerald Isle departed.

Emerald Isle Enters the Harbor in the middle of a snow storm.

The Emerald Isle prepares and backs into its Beaver Island dock.

The end of the season is upon us!

Mike Green to Retire

December 20, 2021

Captain Green shows the youngers how to wheel the boat.

Mike Green will retire today after working for the Beaver Island Boat Company for many years, longer than the editor has been on the island, and that's a long time.  Congratulations, Mike, on your retirement!  Your services will be missed. Today is Mike's last trip on the Emerald Isle ferry and will be returning today on his last trip back to the island as the captain of the ferry.

Simeon Richards Graduates

December 20, 2021

Simeon Richards poses with his family

Simeon Richard graduated with a Bachelor's of Science degree in electrical engineering.  He can work on items from circuit boards to power distribution.  He has been employed as an intern with a software company in the UK.  He was just recently hired as a full time employee.  He will be working remotely from a home in Detroit, MI.  Simeon's job will be help people learn to work with a software product similar to the Microsoft Office tools.  When Simeon is not working, he enjoys rock climbing, gardening, and making music.

From BI COA

Hello friends,
Did you hear about the snowman that got upset when the sun came out? The answer is at the end of this announcement.
The Charlevoix County Commission on Aging on Beaver Island will begin in person activities at the Beaver Island Community Center in January 2022. All activities planned can be found on the Community Center Calendar. These activities will be limited to a maximum of 10 people and mask will always be required. To register for activities please call 448-2124.
Charlevoix County residents ages 60 and older on Beaver Island may pick up meal vouchers to use at participating restaurants on Beaver Island. The meal voucher program is offered to island seniors because there is no senior center to receive nutritious lunches from Monday through Friday, as on the mainland. Currently, meal voucher participating businesses are Dalwhinnie, the Shamrock bar and restaurant and the Beaver Island Community School. C.O.A. meal vouchers may be picked up at the Beaver Island office. To learn more about the meal voucher program or to order meal vouchers please call 231-448-2124.
The Charlevoix County C.O.A. office on Beaver Island office is closed Thursday, December 23 and Friday, December 24, 2021. Office hours will reopen on Monday, December 27. We are also closed on Friday December 31, 2021.  
There is a supplemental food program that offers food boxes to income qualifying Charlevoix County Commission on Aging clients. The commodity supplemental food program is a nutrition education program providing monthly supplemental foods to help promote health for people 60 years of age and older who meet income guidelines. For more information about this program people are asked to call the Northwest Community Action Agency at 231-775-8330.
To learn more about what the Charlevoix County Commission on Aging on Beaver Island offers, please call site coordinator Lonnie Allen at 231-448-2124. Office hours are still by appointment only.
Joke: Did you hear about the snowman that got upset when the sun came out? Answer: He had a total meltdown.

Grace and peace be with you,

Lonnie Allen

Site Coordinator, Beaver Island COA

Charlevoix County Beaver Island

Building coordinator/Maintenance assistant

(231) 448-2124

allenl@charlevoixcounty.org

Snowy Owl Sleeps

December 19, 2021

After two church services on Sunday, the editor decided to head over to see if the snowy owl was in its apparently safe location with very little traffic and lots of woodland around it.  Sure enough, the owl was there with an opportunity to get some rest on a pile of pallets there at the boat company parking lot.  The obsession of this editor with these birds is obvious.

Weather by Joe

December 20, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

This morning at 7:30 here on Carlisle Road, it is 34 degree with wind from the NE at 4 mph. The humidity is 84%. The pressures is 29.97. The sky is cloudy and visibility is at ten miles.

TODAY, it is expected to be cloudy with snow. Chance of snow is 80%. The high will be in the middle 30's. Winds will be from the W at 15 to 25 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for cloudy skies with a low new 20 degrees. The wind will be from the NW at 10 to 20 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for cloudy skies with snow. Chance of snow is 90%. The high will be near 30 degrees. Wind will be from the SE at 10 to 15 mph. Accumulation of snow could be 1 to 3 inches.
____________________________

ON THIS DAY

On December 20, 1836, President Andrew Jackson presents Congress with a treaty he negotiated with the Ioway, Sacs, Sioux, Fox, Otoe and Omaha tribes of the Missouri territory. The treaty, which removed those tribes from their ancestral homelands to make way for white settlement, epitomized racist 19th century presidential policies toward Native Americans. The agreement was just one of nearly 400 treaties—nearly always unequal—that were concluded between various tribes and the U.S. government between 1788 and 1883.
American population growth and exploration of the west in the early to mid-1800s amplified conflicts over territory inhabited by Native American tribes who held different views of land and property ownership than white settlers. During this time, Andrew Jackson played a major part in shaping U.S. policy toward Native Americans. A hero of the War of 1812, he earned equal recognition as an Indian fighter and treaty negotiator. In fact, he brokered nine treaties before becoming president in 1829. In 1830, as part of his zealous quest to acquire new territory for the nation, President Jackson pushed for the passing of the Indian Removal Act. It was this act that allowed for the 1838 forced removal by the U.S. military of Cherokee from their Georgia homeland to barren land in the Oklahoma territory. The march at gunpoint—during which 4,000 Cherokee died from starvation, disease and the cold—became known as the Trail of Tears. Jackson’s policies toward Indians reflected the general view among whites of the time that Indians were an inferior race who stood in the way of American economic progress.
A few presidents have made small attempts to bridge the gap of mistrust and maltreatment between the U.S. government and Native Americans. In 1886, Grover Cleveland protected Indian land rights when a railroad company petitioned the government to run tracks through a reservation. In 1924, Calvin Coolidge passed the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924, which granted automatic U.S. citizenship to all American tribes, along with all the rights pertaining to citizenship. On personal moral grounds, Coolidge sincerely regretted the state of poverty to which many Indian tribes had sunk after decades of legal persecution and forced assimilation. Throughout his two terms in office, Coolidge presented at least a public image as a strong proponent of tribal rights. In recognition of his advocacy for Native Americans, a North Dakota tribe of Sioux “adopted” Coolidge as an honorary tribal member in 1927. However, U.S. government policies of forced assimilation, which worked to separate families and tribes and destroy native cultures, remained in full swing during his administration.
Largely relegated to reservations by the late 1800s, Native American tribes across the country were obliterated by disease and plunged into poverty, a state many remain in today.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

In one of his first acts as the new commander in chief of the German army, Adolf Hitler informs General Franz Halder that there will be no retreating from the Russian front near Moscow. “The will to hold out must be brought home to every unit!”
Halder was also informed that he could stay on as chief of the general army staff if he so chose, but only with the understanding that Hitler alone was in charge of the army’s movements and strategies.
Halder accepted the terms, but it was another blow to their already tense relationship. Halder had been at odds with the Fuhrer from the earliest days of the Nazi regime, when he spoke disparagingly of Hitler’s leadership ability and feared that “this madman” would plunge Germany into war. Promoted to chief of staff in September 1938, Halder began concocting an assassination scheme shortly thereafter along with other military officers who feared another European war over the Sudetenland crisis, when Hitler demanded the German-speaking population of Czechoslovakia—and the territory in which they resided—be made part of a greater Germany. Only a “peaceful” resolution to the crisis—the forced diplomatic capitulation of Czechoslovakia—killed the conspiracy. With Hitler’s popularity among the German people growing, and the timidity of the then-commander in chief of the army, General Walter von Brauchitsch, Halder learned to live with the “madman” in power.
But Halder would continue to butt heads with Hitler, urging that military strategy be left to the general staff when Hitler wanted to impose his imperious will on the army. But as the offensive against Moscow collapsed, an offensive which Halder had supported, and for which he began to agonize over, given the number of German dead, Halder could only concede to Hitler’s seizing of power, if just to retain his position on the general staff. By staying on, Halder hoped to be able to protect the remaining German troops on the Eastern front from the consequences of Hitler’s obsession over defeating the Soviets. Unfortunately, Hitler dismissed Halder during another disastrous Russian offensive, this one against Stalingrad in 1942.
_____________________________
WORD OF THE DAY

huckster; noun; (HUCK-ster)

A huckster is a person who is aggressive or dishonest in selling.

// The jewelry that the huckster was peddling was obviously imitation.

Examples

"… somewhere between four million and eleven million people identified as Spiritualists in the United States alone. Some of the leaders back then were hucksters, and some of the believers were easy marks…." — Casey Cep, The New Yorker, 31 May 2021

Did You Know?

Huckster comes from the Dutch noun hokester and verb hoeken, which means "to peddle."

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

Church Services 12/19/2021

Christian Church Service

Judi Meister made the announcements and played a Prelude

The Advent Candles were lit.

Ralph Williamson and Kimberly Mitchell did the readings

.

Pastor Andrew Pomerville

View video of the service HERE

Mass from Holy Cross

Bill McDonough did the readings....Father Peter Wigton was the celebrant.....All the Advent Candles were lit.

Decorating for Christmas after the Mass was over.

View video of the Mass HERE

Weather by Joe

December 19, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

This morning on Carlisle Road at 7 a.m., there is no wind. The temperature is 24 degrees. The pressure is 30.30. The humidity is 91%. It's cloudy and visibility is ten miles.

TODAY, it is expected to have cloudy skies with a high just above freezing. Winds will be from the SW at 10 to 15 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for cloudy skies becoming windy with a few snow flurries possible. The low will be at freezing. The wind will be from the SW at 20 to 30 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for cloudy skies with snow showers in the morning. Chance of snow is 50%. The winds will be from the W at 15 to 25 mph.
_____________________________

ON THIS DAY

On December 19, 1843, Charles Dickens’ classic story “A Christmas Carol” is published.
Dickens was born in 1812 and attended school in Portsmouth. His father, a clerk in the navy pay office, was thrown into debtors’ prison in 1824, and 12-year-old Charles was sent to work in a factory. The miserable treatment of children and the institution of the debtors’ jail became topics of several of Dickens’ novels.
In his late teens, Dickens became a reporter and started publishing humorous short stories when he was 21. In 1836, a collection of his stories, Sketches by Boz, later known as The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, was published. The same year, he married Catherine Hogarth, with whom he would have nine children. The short sketches in his collection were originally commissioned as captions for humorous drawings by caricature artist Robert Seymour, but Dickens’ whimsical stories about the kindly Samuel Pickwick and his fellow club members soon became popular in their own right. Only 400 copies were printed of the first installment, but by the 15th episode 40,000 copies were printed. When the stories were published in book form in 1837, Dickens quickly became the most popular author of the day.
The success of the Pickwick Papers was soon reproduced with Oliver Twist (1838) and Nicholas Nickleby (1839). In 1841, Dickens published two more novels, then spent five months in the United States, where he was welcomed as a literary hero. Dickens never lost momentum as a writer, churning out major novels every year or two, often in serial form. Among his most important works are David Copperfield (1850), Great Expectations (1861), and A Tale of Two Cities (1859).

Beginning in 1850, he published his own weekly circular of fiction, poetry, and essays called Household Words. In 1858, Dickens separated from his wife and began a long affair with a young actress. He gave frequent readings, which became immensely popular. He died in 1870 at the age of 58, with his last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, still unfinished.

Also, ON THIS DAY:
With the onset of the bitter winter cold, the Continental Army under General George Washington, still in the field, enters its winter camp at Valley Forge, 22 miles from British-occupied Philadelphia. Washington chose a site on the west bank of the Schuylkill River that could be effectively defended in the event of a British attack.
During 1777, Patriot forces under General Washington suffered major defeats against the British at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown; Philadelphia, the capital of the United States, fell into British hands. The particularly severe winter of 1777-1778 proved to be a great trial for the American army, and of the 11,000 soldiers stationed at Valley Forge, hundreds died from disease. However, the suffering troops were held together by loyalty to the Patriot cause and to General Washington, who stayed with his men. As the winter stretched on, Prussian military adviser Frederick von Steuben kept the soldiers busy with drills and training in modern military strategy.

When Washington’s army marched out of Valley Forge on June 19, 1778, the men were better disciplined and stronger in spirit than when they had entered. Nine days later, they fought against the British under Lord Cornwallis at the Battle of Monmouth in New Jersey.

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

New Baby

Weston Daniyel Ward made his arrival at 10:52 this morning. Weighing 10 pounds and 3 oz,

Mom--Ireland McDonough; Dad--Josh Ward

Memories and More Memories 11

By Joseph A. Moore


Well, the reason for the first memory today was actually a golf match that was shortened by a rain storm last night.  The former good friend and I were competing on opposing teams, and the memory of the first trip to a home on Donegal Bay hit me in the head and caused me to dream about the patient and the issues my friend and I had.
I can tell you that the primary responsibility for this 80 year old female fell on my shoulders as the call went out to Beaver Island EMS for this patient who was experiencing chest pain.  I had been to this home a few times before, and the patient was having chest pain on each of these previous occasions.  She had been transported to the hospital before by us, and this was probably not going to be too different, but I reminded myself, “Each and every call is different, and I need to be ready for anything.”
So, when the pager went off in my living room with the emergency response car parked in my driveway, I quickly put on my EMS jacket, calling on the radio, “Echo 4 is enroute to the scene.”
Central Dispatch stated, “The patient is alone at the residence, is complaining of chest pain, and says she has already taken a nitro with no relief in pain level.’
“Copy that,” I responded on the echo car radio.
It was about a half mile from my home to Donegal Bay Road and another mile to the home, and I was traveling about 40 mph with lights and siren going as I passed the ambulance barn that had no one yet ready to bring the ambulance.

Read the rest of the story HERE

Weather by Joe

December 18, 2021

Good morning from Beaver Island!

At 7;30 a.m. on Carlisle Road, it is 27 degrees with humidity at 97%. The wind is from the ESE at 3 mph. The pressure is 30.17. The skies are cloudy with visibility of 6 miles.

TODAY, it is expected to have snow showers. Chance of snow is 60%. The high will be 30 degrees. Winds will be from the NE at 5 to 10 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for partly cloudy skies with a low near 25 degrees. There is a chance of a few flurries tonight. The wind will be from the NNW at 5 to 10 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for overcast skies with a high near freezing. Winds will be from the WSW at 10 to 15 mph.
________________________

ON THIS DAY

On December 18, 1620, the British ship Mayflower docks at modern-day Plymouth, Massachusetts, and its passengers prepare to begin their new settlement, Plymouth Colony.
The famous Mayflower story began in 1606, when a group of reform-minded Puritans in Nottinghamshire, England, founded their own church, separate from the state-sanctioned Church of England. Accused of treason, they were forced to leave the country and settle in the more tolerant Netherlands. After 12 years of struggling to adapt and make a decent living, the group sought financial backing from some London merchants to set up a colony in America. On September 6, 1620, 102 passengers–dubbed Pilgrims by William Bradford, a passenger who would become the first governor of Plymouth Colony—crowded on the Mayflower to begin the long, hard journey to a new life in the New World.
On November 11, 1620, the Mayflower anchored at what is now Provincetown Harbor, Cape Cod. Before going ashore, 41 male passengers—heads of families, single men and three male servants—signed the famous Mayflower Compact, agreeing to submit to a government chosen by common consent and to obey all laws made for the good of the colony. Over the next month, several small scouting groups were sent ashore to collect firewood and scout out a good place to build a settlement. Around December 10, one of these groups found a harbor they liked on the western side of Cape Cod Bay. They returned to the Mayflower to tell the other passengers, but bad weather prevented them from landing until December 18.
After exploring the region, the settlers took over a cleared area previously occupied by members of a local Native American tribe, the Wampanoag. The tribe had abandoned the village several years earlier, after an outbreak of European disease. That winter of 1620-1621 was brutal, as the Pilgrims struggled to build their settlement, find food and ward off sickness. By spring, 50 of the original 102 Mayflower passengers were dead. The remaining settlers made contact with returning members of the Wampanoag tribe and in March they signed a peace treaty with a tribal chief, Massasoit. Aided by the Wampanoag, especially the English-speaking Squanto, the Pilgrims were able to plant crops—especially corn and beans—that were vital to their survival. The Mayflower and its crew left Plymouth to return to England on April 5, 1621.

Over the next several decades, more and more settlers made the trek across the Atlantic to Plymouth, which gradually grew into a prosperous shipbuilding and fishing center. In 1691, Plymouth was incorporated into the new Massachusetts Bay Association, ending its history as an independent colony.

Also, ON THIS DAY:

Following its ratification by the requisite three-quarters of the states earlier in the month, the 13th Amendment is formally adopted into the U.S. Constitution, ensuring that “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude… shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”
Before the American Civil War, Abraham Lincoln and other leaders of the anti-slavery Republican Party sought not to abolish slavery but merely to stop its extension into new territories and states in the American West. This policy was unacceptable to most Southern politicians, who believed that the growth of free states would turn the U.S. power structure irrevocably against them.
In November 1860, Lincoln’s election as president signaled the secession of seven Southern states and the formation of the Confederate States of America. Shortly after his inauguration in 1861, the Civil War began. Four more Southern states joined the Confederacy, while four border slave states in the upper South remained in the Union.
Lincoln, though he privately detested slavery, responded cautiously to the call by abolitionists for emancipation of all enslaved Americans after the outbreak of the Civil War. As the war dragged on, however, the Republican-dominated federal government began to realize the strategic advantages of emancipation: The liberation of enslaved people would weaken the Confederacy by depriving it of a major portion of its labor force, which would in turn strengthen the Union by producing an influx of manpower. With 11 Southern states seceded from the Union, there were few pro-slavery congressmen to stand in the way of such an action.
In 1862, Congress annulled the fugitive slave laws, prohibited slavery in the U.S. territories, and authorized Lincoln to employ formerly enslaved people in the army. Following the major Union victory at the Battle of Antietam in September, Lincoln issued a warning of his intent to issue an emancipation proclamation for all states still in rebellion on New Year’s Day.
That day—January 1, 1863—President Lincoln formally issued the Emancipation Proclamation, calling on the Union army to liberate all enslaved people in states still in rebellion as “an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution, upon military necessity.” These three million enslaved people were declared to be “then, thenceforward, and forever free.” The proclamation exempted the border states that remained in the Union and all or parts of three Confederate states controlled by the Union army.
The Emancipation Proclamation transformed the Civil War from a war against secession into a war for “a new birth of freedom,” as Lincoln stated in his Gettysburg Address in 1863. This ideological change discouraged the intervention of France or England on the Confederacy’s behalf and enabled the Union to enlist the 180,000 African American soldiers and sailors who volunteered to fight between January 1, 1863, and the conclusion of the war.
As the Confederacy staggered toward defeat, Lincoln realized that the Emancipation Proclamation, a war measure, might have little constitutional authority once the war was over. The Republican Party subsequently introduced the 13th Amendment into Congress, and in April 1864 the necessary two-thirds of the overwhelmingly Republican Senate passed the amendment. However, the House of Representatives, featuring a higher proportion of Democrats, did not pass the amendment by a two-thirds majority until January 1865, three months before Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox.
On December 2, 1865, Alabama became the 27th state to ratify the 13th Amendment, thus giving it the requisite three-fourths majority of states’ approval necessary to make it the law of the land. Alabama, a former Confederate state, was forced to ratify the amendment as a condition for re-admission into the Union. On December 18, the 13th Amendment was officially adopted into the Constitution—246 years after the first shipload of captive Africans landed at Jamestown, Virginia, and were bought as enslaved workers.
Slavery’s legacy and efforts to overcome it have remained central issues in U.S. society and politics, particularly during the post-Civil War Reconstruction era and the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s.
___________________________

WORD OF THE DAY

rationale; noun; (rash-uh-NAL)

What It Means

A rationale is an explanation or reason for something said or done.

// Senators who opposed the bill were questioned by media to uncover their rationale for voting against it.

Examples

"The casting of Chris Pratt as the voice of both Mario and Garfield has resulted in further mocking online, but his previous work as a voice artist goes some way in justifying the rationale behind these decisions. Pratt is no stranger to voice acting, having starred in both The LEGO Movie and its sequel….Pratt also voiced elf Barley in Pixar's Onward." — Andrew Waskett-Burt, Screen Rant, 5 Nov. 2021

Did You Know?

Rationale comes from Latin ratio, meaning "reason," and rationalis, "endowed with reason." Ratio is reasonably familiar as an English word for the relationship (in number, quantity, or degree) between things.

(from Merriam Webster and history dot com)

Beaver Island Community School Weekly Update

Friday, December 17, 2021

Boys Basketball Postponed

The Boys Basketball trip to Grand Marais has been canceled for this weekend due to tomorrow’s predicted weather conditions. The games will be rescheduled after the new year. In the meantime, stay healthy and keep practicing!

Thank You Santa’s Workshop Elves

Thanks to the time, talent, and treasure of many Islanders, the 19th Annual Santa’s Workshop went off without a hitch! In addition to the support of the Friends of Vets and the AMVETS, we’d like to give a shout out to the following elves: Theresa McDonough, Ryann Turner, Rose Martin, Tammy LaFreniere, Jessica LaFreniere, Skylar Marsh, and Lisa Gillespie. Thank you for continuing this tradition!

Wreaths Across America

On Monday, December 13th, the 4th-6th grade class and the High School Model United Nations class joined dozens of Islanders in the Wreaths Across America program. Together, they paid tribute to the Island’s veterans by placing a wreath on the grave marker of every veteran at both the St. James Township Cemetery and the Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery. This was a great opportunity for our students to learn about their past and express their gratitude and respect.

Upcoming Vaccination Dates (some next week)!

In response to parents’ and Islanders requesting to get vaccinated ASAP in the face of the Omicron variant, the Beaver Island Rural Health Center is scheduling several vaccination clinics over the holidays. Because the dosage is slightly different for those who are under 12, and the boosters are available for those who are 16 and older, please note the different days for each category. In order to get your vaccine, please contact the Beaver Island Rural Health Center to schedule your appointment.

·         Mon, 12/20/21 (1st dose for 12-15; booster or 1st dose for 16 and older)

·         Tues, 12/21/21 (1st dose for 5-11 year-olds)

·         Weds, 12/22/21 (1st dose for 12-15; booster or 1st dose for 16 and older)

·         Tues, 12/28/21 (1st dose for 12-15; booster or 1st dose for 16 and older)

·         Weds, 12/29/21 (1st dose for 12-15; booster or 1st dose for 16 and older)

·         Tuesday, 1/11/22 (2nd dose for 5-11 years (but 1st dose welcome too!))

Parents—please note that the HDNW has not planned another vaccination clinic at the school for the foreseeable future. Thank you BIRHC for making this very convenient option available for our students to get vaccinated and for our Island residents to get boosted!

Parents—PLEASE Check your Child for Symptoms BEFORE School!

In order to keep our school open, we need every parent to help us out by checking your student for symptoms BEFORE you bring them to school. If your child is showing any cold, flu, or COVID-19 symptoms, please keep them at home and consider having them tested for COVID-19 either at the school or at the Health Center.

Beaver Island’s Elves!

‘Tis the season of giving…and an Island Elf has worked a deal with Dalwhinnie’s Deli for Beaver Island’s students! During the month of December, any BICS student may receive one free breakfast or dinner compliments of our own Beaver Island Elf! Thank you!

Gingerbread House Projects—Courtesy of the Beaver Island Community Center!

Today, our friends at the Beaver Island Community Center dropped off mini Gingerbread House kits for our elementary students (and there were some left over for our secondary students too). At the end of the day, we gave each elementary student a kit to take home so that our families have a fun holiday activity. Thank you BICC staff and supporters for these wonderful gifts!

Elks Power!

The Beaver Island Elks Lodge was awarded a grant to provide Power Book Bags for Island children. This program supplies students with new books three times over the school year. The books will be given out to the students just prior to Christmas, Spring, and Summer breaks. At each distribution, the students will be allowed to choose two books and will also receive a goody bag stuffed with enriching activities. The first distribution will be on December 21st here at school! Thank you Elks!

Masking Option for Winter Athletes—Testing Every Tuesday Morning

The HDNW has modified their mask order to allow student athletes who participate in weekly COVID-19 testing to not wear a mask while actively playing or practicing (they still need to wear their masks at all other times). We will be testing at 8:00 every Tuesday morning. Students can sign up for this program anytime—even if they missed the first two weeks of testing.

Holiday Events at the Community Center and BICS Student Caroling is Canceled

Out of an abundance of caution and to ensure the safety of the Island community, the Beaver Island Community Center is canceling the indoor events planned for December and we will not be caroling door to door with our students next week. However, keep an eye on the school’s FaceBook page, as there may be some singing posts!

Happy Holidays!

Stay Safe and Healthy!

Deb Pomorski
BICS Secretary
debbiep@beaverisland.k12.mi.us
231-448-2744

 

 
 

 

Elks BI Burger Night Flyer

20 December 2021

December 20, 2021 5:00pm – 6:30 pm at the Gregg Fellowship Hall

PEAINE TOWNSHIP SPECIAL MEETING

December 20, 2021, at 1:00PM

Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award

December 18, 2021

Jim Slough received the Wright Brothers' Master Pilot Award today at the Charlevoix Airport.  Congratulations, Jim!

To be eligible for the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award, nominees must meet the following criteria:

  • Hold a U.S. Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) or Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) pilot certificate.
  • Have 50 or more years of civil and military piloting experience or 50 or more years combined experience in both piloting and aircraft operations.
    • Up to 20 years of the required 50 years may be U.S. military experience.
    • The effective start date for the 50 years is the date of the nominee’s first solo flight or military equivalent.
    • The 50 years may be computed consecutively or non-consecutively.
  • Be a U.S. citizen.
  • Have NOT had any airman certificate revoked.

Wreaths Across America, Island Style

(Photo and story Courtesy of KK Belfy Antokoviak)

A wreath was placed at the grave of every Veteran interred in both cemeteries. 122 at Holy Cross and 18 at the Townships Cemeteries.   Mrs. Robert, Mr Cwikel, Mr Richards and students (I'll attach pic) Catherine Sowa Meintsma location coordinator, Pam O'Brien, alvin Lafreniere, Kitty McNamara, Maeve Green, Loretta Slater, Sara Siler, Katie Garret, Jeanne Gillespie, Angel Welke, Michelle Grooter, and Kathleen Belfy Antokoviak all participated.

The wreaths come from Maine. Our island group mention above sold all wreaths needed for this year and actually exceeded the goal and have 59 sold for next year already.

"We understand we have Veterans Day in the fall and Memorial Day in the spring, but our service members sacrifice their time and safety every single day of the year to preserve our freedoms.

In many homes, there is an empty seat for one who is serving or one who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. There is no better time to express our appreciation than during the hustle and bustle of the holiday season. We hope you will join us at any of our more than 2,500 participating locations to show our veterans and their families that we will not forget. We will never forget." (from Wreaths Across America website)

(Editor's note:  Pictures and video were taken of each gravesite that was assumed to be a veteran, but in the cold blustery day, there could have been those that were missed or those that were accidentally added.  This is the best that the three hours of windy and cold weather could produce.)

View the wreaths at the Township Cemetery HERE

View the wreaths at the Holy Cross Cemetery HERE

View video HERE

Northern Lake Michigan Islands Collaborative Meeting

Notes from the October Meetings

Ancestry Library Edition

at the Beaver Island District Library

Ancestry Library Edition was funded by a SUN grant from CCCF, BI Historical Society and BI District Library.

St. James Township Meeting Minutes

Draft Minutes for the December 8, 2021 regular meeting HERE

Community Investment Program for Beaver Island Elks, Lodge 2886

December 13, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

Owl Sighting

December 17, 2021

While pictures were being taken of the Wreaths Across America at the Holy Cross Cemetery, this editor received a tip about the snowy owl being in the tree out by Welke Airport.  Finishing the row of wreaths, the editor headed out to see about getting a pictures of the snowy owl.  Here is the result.

The owl was obviously worried about this editor being even two hundred plus yards away, so no closer pictures were attempted.

Wind Damage

December 18, 2021

The other day the winds were gusting above 50 mph with waves in the harbor which had white caps.  The variation of the wind speed were astounding and moving from ground level at 10 mph to 50 mph.  Besides, the power outage for the entire island with power back on to the town area in a couple of hours, the trees took down power lines and left branches and debris all over the island. 

The only example that is pretty obvious to anyone that goes to Gull Harbor is shown below.

Beaver Island Waste Management Committee

Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 1:30PM

I. CALL TO ORDER

II. APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES for October 19, 2021 (attached)

III. REPORTS
A. Budget Report & Single Stream Up-date (Tilly)
     B. Transfer Station & Recycle Center Manager Report (Marsh)

IV. ANNOUNCEMENTS (Chair)

V. OLD BUSINESS
     Committee Top Three Priorities (goals and objectives) for FY 2021/22 (Cole)

VI  NEW BUSINESS
      New & Temporary Policy Concerning Recyclable Cans and Bottles. 

VI. PUBLIC COMMENT

VII. ADJOURNMENT

View October minutes HERE

Health Department of Northwest Michigan COVID-19 Update 

December 16, 2021  

Pfizer booster shot strongly recommended for anyone 16+  

As COVID-19 cases in northern Michigan – and across the state – continue to rise, officials with the Health Department of Northwest Michigan are urging residents to use caution during holiday gatherings. 

The latest COVID-19 data reported by the Health Department of Northwest Michigan has been compiled into a report to show residents a picture of COVID-19 in the community. The Case Trend Summary for November 8 – December 12 includes data for all cases, and highlights the differences between unvaccinated and vaccinated cases. Key data points from the report for the 5-week period ending December 12 include: 

·        2,322 total cases reported 

·        Of cases with a confirmatory COVID-19 test: 

o   63.7% of cases were not vaccinated (cases that do not meet the criteria of a fully vaccinated individual) 

o   68% of hospitalizations were unvaccinated individuals 

o   73.9% of COVID-19 deaths were unvaccinated individuals 

The number of cases continues to put pressure on health care systems, hospitals, businesses due to worker shortages, and schools and families. 

Throughout the state, more than 55% of residents age 5 and older are fully vaccinated (two weeks following a two-dose Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, or one week following a Johnson & Johnson vaccine). As the fully vaccinated population has increased, so have the percentage of breakthrough incidents. An infographic released from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services illustrates when more people are vaccinated, more cases may still come from the vaccinated population. 

However, the risk of infection, grave illness, and death remains significantly lower among the fully vaccinated. Munson Healthcare officials recently noted they are experiencing an   unprecedented number of hospitalizations specifically due to COVID-19. Among these COVID-driven hospitalizations, many patients are being elevated to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), where they may require the support of a ventilator to assist with breathing difficulties. As reflected in current data, the vast majority of patients who've been hospitalized at Munson Healthcare for COVID-19 are unvaccinated. 

“Vaccination is still the best tool we have to moderate the impact of this pandemic,” said Dr. Josh Meyerson, Medical Director with the Health Department of Northwest Michigan. “Vaccines protect us from severe disease. Booster doses have shown to further reduce the risk of disease and reduce infection rates. I encourage everyone to get vaccinated, including your booster dose as soon as you are eligible.” 

In addition to getting vaccinated, Dr. Meyerson urges everyone to continue to practice mitigation measures including masking at work and indoor public places. Further, residents should stay home if they have symptoms such as chills, fever, or mild respiratory/flu-like illness. Get tested and return to work, school or socializing once your test is negative and you’re feeling better, or if you test positive wait 10 days after your symptoms started before ending isolation. If you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 (i.e., a close contact), take precautions even if you are vaccinated or otherwise do not need to quarantine. 

COVID-19 vaccinations – including booster shots – are widely available at pharmacies, health care providers and health department clinics. For a list of vaccine providers and locations in Antrim, Charlevoix, Emmet and Otsego counties, click here. To schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment with the Health Department of Northwest Michigan exclusively for children 5 to 11 years old, click here. To schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment with the health department for anyone 12 and older, click here. A parent/guardian must accompany anyone younger than 18 to a COVID-19 clinic. Please bring an insurance card to the appointment. Anyone with questions or unable to find a time or date that works for them and/or their child may call the health department at 800-432-4121. 

To find a test site in the area, visit http://www.nwhealth.org/covid19main.html

Stay up to date on the latest information in the Health Department of Northwest Michigan jurisdiction by liking and following our Facebook page and visiting our COVID-19 Data Dashboard. To locate a testing facility, visit the Michigan COVID-19 Test Finder website. To track the risk levels of COVID-19 pandemic indicators, visit the MI Safe Start Map website. For more information regarding the COVID-19 vaccine, visit the MDHHS vaccine website or the CDC vaccine website.

LAUREL JOHNSON, M.Ed, CHES

Community Health Coordinator, Public Information Officer

3434 M-119, Suite A, Harbor Springs, MI 49740

Office: 231-347-5628 

www.nwhealth.org

Munson Healthcare Vaccinated vs. Unvaccinated

COVID COUNTS

Case trends Graphs

Pocket Gardens

December 14, 2021

The editor took a picture of each of the pocket gardens beginning on the Main Street on the inland side of the road first, and then coming back and taking pictures of the few on the harbor side of the road.  The following are the favorites of this editor as taken in daylight.

The above are not in any particular order.

View video of all the pocket gardens HERE

Note for the video:  The video is shorter than it appears.  Some glitch on the video making software appears to make the end quite long with nothing there.  The video is complete, even though the blank ending is there. 

B. I. District Library Announces New Books

December 15, 2021

See what's new this week at the Beaver Island District Library at:

There are three new bestsellers, 41 new children's books, and ten other new books.

The new bestsellers this week are "Wish You Were Here: A Novel," "Autopsy: A Scarpetta Novel," and "The Personal Librarian."

 

 

Joan Delamater, RIP

Joan Yvonne Delamater

Joan Yvonne Delamater's life journey ended December 12 surrounded by her children. Joan was born October 28, 1940, to Frances and Earl Bussiere. She was married to Larry Delamater for 63 years. Joan and Larry had ten children, Jamie Delamater, Rick (Karen) Delamater, Wally (Sherri) Delamater, Shane Delamater, Valarie Delamater, Tamie (Danny) Gillespie, Gena (Kevin) King, Robin Delamater, Larry Delamater, Brandy (Chris) Bartley. Larry and Joan also had 27 grandchildren and 37 great grandchildren…and counting. She is preceded in death by: Larry Delamater (husband), Frances and Earl Bussiere (parents), Betty Block (Sister), Margaret Ponicky (sister), and Jewell Gillespie (grandson).

Joan was born in Houghton, MI, but spent her formative years in Grand Rapids, before moving to Six Lakes where she met and married Larry, and began their family. They spent most of their married life in the Six Lakes/Lakeview area except for a period of 8 years that they lived on Beaver Island where they made many friends and many more memories.

Joan dedicated her life to raising her family. We have never figured out how she found time for anything else but she enjoyed a wide range of interests. Besides her children, her greatest love was fabric! She was a master seamstress and quilter, and spent several years as a sewing teacher at Beaver Island school. For years Joan treasured hosting monthly sewing classes with her beloved "Sewing Girls". Her entire life she created art through her love of fabric and thread. Music, dancing and games always filled the Delamater house, and this love was passed to her children and grandchildren. Family get togethers involved friends, music, dancing, horseshoe tournaments, or card tournaments. Joan and Larry participated in Tamarack Twirler square dancers for many years and attended regular dances at the local VFW hall. Joan was curious by nature. She was driven by her love of learning to look up anything and everything, often referring to her encyclopedias, her well-worn dictionary, and her most beloved medical book. Her curiosity led her to take classes at Montcalm Community College where she enrolled in every social and political science class offered, eventually earning an Associate Degree at the age of 50. She was an avid reader of both books and daily newspapers. She loved nature and spent many years hauling her big tribe on camping trips all over the state. In her later years, she and Larry traveled to all 48 continuous states, and she snuck in a trip to Hawaii when her daughter gave birth to twins while living in Honolulu. She fed everyone who came to her home, and was known for feeding you whether you were hungry or not. She did it all…she canned, she made the best homemade bread, jams, pies and pasty. She was a sports enthusiast, for years never missing a Tigers or Pistons game. She also was a Nascar fan as long as Jimmy Johnson was driving. She never met a cat she didn't love and she never passed up a diet Coke. She stayed informed of all current events and was a lifelong proud democrat. She had great pride in all of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. They all believed they were her favorite!

A memorial and internment of her ashes are being planned for spring. In lieu of flowers, Joan would be so pleased if you sent a donation to: Southern Poverty Law Center 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104

Snowy Owl Story

December 14, 2021

A quick flag down and a tip was given first about the location of the owl.  Next, the owl was relaxing on the pallets at the BIBCO parking lot, so  few pictures were taken.  Then, a boat company employee was doing his job and brought a van to the parking lot, which, of course, was parked right between the photographer and the owl, so the owl took off.  The surprised photographer was not ready to take a photo of the flying owl, and the owl was moving quite quickly toward the soccer field.

Looking at the trees near the parking lot, and the county building, and eventually driving up to the corner of Donegal Bay and the Kings Highway, my cell phone rang.  This call was yet another friend asking if this photographer had seen the owl in the top of a tree between the county building and the BIBCO parking lot. The photographer took the course of making an illegal U-turn near the school as the skies were getting dark and no traffice was seen.

The evening was windy and the tree with owl was swaying in the breeze.  The darkness was the enemy, but the photo was needed.

There, in the very top of the tree was the same snowy owl as the sky became quite dark.  Several pictures were taken, but the lack of light was causing the focus to be very difficult.

A Great Lakes Jewell

Copyright 2007

This was a project of the Beaver Island Association. The video and pictures take us back to the times when John Works was the Peaine Supervisor, Don Vyse was the St. James Township Supervisor, and Bill Cashman was the Beaver Island Historical Society Director. It's great to see and hear these people, particularly those that are no longer with us. The kids are all grown up now. This is worth the time to watch the video.

View the video HERE

BITA Meetings

for 2021-2022, will be held on the following dates

November 9, 2021
May 10, 2022
December 14, 2021
June 14, 2022
January 11, 2022
July 12, 2022
February 8, 2022
August 9, 2022
March 8, 2022
September 13, 2022
April 12, 2022
October 11, 2022

Meeting Dates for St. James Township for 2022


January 12
February 9
March 9
April 13
May 11
June 15 (3rd Wednesday)
July 13
August 10
September 14
October 12
November 9
December 14

Beaver Island Emergency Services Authority

Thursday, December 16, 2021, at 2:00 p.m. at Peaine Township Hall

Agenda for the Meeting

Minutes from the previous meeting

BIEMS BUDG VS ACT 21-22 11-30-21 12-13-21

BIEMS GF CHK NOV 2021

BIESA dba BIFD GF CHK NOV 2021

FIRE DEPARTMENT BUDGET VS ACTUAL NOV 2021-2022 12-14-21


Northern Lights All-League Soccer & Volleyball Teams

December 16, 2021

Northern Lights League, All League Soccer Teams 2021
Teams: Beaver Island, Big Bay de Noc, Grand Marais, Hannahville, Mackinac Island, Munising Baptist, Ojibwe


1st Team:
Cam Miller Big Bay, Player of the Year/Team Captain
Josh Maloney Munising Baptist
Ryan Swift Munising Baptist
Xander Spry Hannahville
Jared Robert Beaver Island
Alix Bleau Big Bay
Joel Gillespie Big Bay
Marquis Harmon Ojibwe
Shaye Halfaday Hannahville
Harrison Myers Mackinac Island
Vincent Davis Mackinac Island
Matthew Cowell Mackinac Island

Honorable Mention Team:
Annileece Lofquist Hannahville
Mequon Jackson Hannahville
McKenna Turner Beaver Island
Micah Richards Beaver Island
Brayden Thill Big Bay
Piper Jones Big Bay
Ethan Bell Grand Marais
Derby Kromer Mackinac Island
Aidan Dean Beaver Island
Cam Pederson Big Bay
Emma Swift Munising Baptist
Skylar Graves Munising Baptist
Teagan Lawrence Grand Marais
Aiden Yiirs Ojibwe
Manuel Pascuzzi Ojibwe

Northern Light League All-League Volleyball Teams 2021:


Teams: Beaver Island, Big Bay De Noc, Hannahville, Mackinac Island,
Maplewood Baptist, Munising Baptist, Ojibwe
The All-League teams are selected by all coaches from each of the Northern Lights League schools

 

1st Team:
Chloe May Maplewood Baptist, Player of the Year/Team Captain
Halie Miller Maplewood Baptist
Alix Bleau Big Bay de Noc
Katelyn DeKeyser Big Bay de Noc
Clara Chambers Mackinac Island
Olga Burton Beaver Island

2nd Team:
Emma Swift 
Munising Baptist
Annileece Lofquist Hannahville
Maggie Jentoft Maplewood Baptist
Autumn Kuzmik Ojibwe
Alyssa Martin Beaver Island
Makayla Rickley Mackinac Island

Honorable Mentions:
Zoe Moser Munising Baptist
Dezeree Lattergrass Hannahville
Kayley Annand Ojibwe

BICS Board Meeting

December 13, 2021, at 6:30 p.m.

Board Members

Superintendent

View the packet HERE

View video of the meeting HERE

Carol Bearss' Address

Carole Bearss

Pineview Cottage #102

3498 Harbor-Petoskey Road

Harbor Springs MI

49740

Funeral Mass for Mike Purdue

December 11, 2021, at 11 am

The Funeral Mass for Mike Purdue was today at the St. Mary's Cathedral.  The Mass was quite interesting to watch and the sermon was very good.  Ryan Wojan made comments about "This is Mike!"  Christie Heller Purdue got up and thanked everyone for their love and prayers, and continued to ask for prayers and memories to continue.

St, Mary's Cathedral

Ryan Wojan's "That is Mike"

Christie Heller Purdue thanks everyone for their love and prayers

Funeral Mass for Mike Purdue

Northern Lake Michigan Islands Collaborative Meeting

October 14-15, 2021

Meeting Notes

St. James Township Board Meeting

December 8, 2021, @ 5:30 p.m.

This meeting was rescheduled from December 1, 2021, due to the COVID concerns on Beaver Island.  The meeting took place at the St. James Township Hall.  All members of the board were present along with the deputy supervisor and the deputy clerk. The meeting was live streamed on Beaver Island TV.

Agenda for 12082021

Draft minutes November 22, 2021 Special Meeting

Draft Minutes, November 3, 2021 regular meeting

Expenditures 12.21

Planning and Administrative Assistant Task List (2)

Supervisor Lens 2021-12 1

View video of the meeting HERE

For those that either can't or don't have the time to watch the video of the meeting, a summary of the meeting is presented below:

The call to order, the pledge of allegiance, and the welcoming of new board member Vicky Fingeroot were done at the very beginning of the meeting.  Vicky Fingeroot took the oath of office prior to the start of the meeting.  The minutes of the regular board meeting of November 3, 2021, and the approval of the special meeting of November 22, 2021, were approved.  The bills for payment with two additional bills were approved.  The cleaning person was approved for the Governmental Center and the township hall was appointed.  Mary Palmer was the appointee.  Julie Gillespie was appointed to the BITAC and the BIAC to take the position vacated Kitty McNamara.  Vicky Fingeroot was appointed to replace Joe Moore on the Waste Management Committee. Diane McDonough's position on the rural health center was discussed, and research determined that her position on the BIRHC Board was not to expire until the end of 2022.  Bob Tidmore and Nathan Altman were re-appointed to the Planning Commission. 

The Administrative Assistant position was divided into two separate positions shown in the task list above, and Cynthia Pryor and Shelby Harris will split the tasks shown in this list.  The zoning board of appeals positions will be posted after the requirements of the positions are determined.  The use of the Marina North Building will be researched by Paul Cole, and Joe Moore was given the authority to make the decision on the rates and to offer this to the two agencies wishing to use the building for storage.  The monies for the pocket gardens and the payment was determined and will be made from the funds raised for this purpose.  The January meeting and additonal meetings will take place on the second Wednesday of the month instead of the first Wednesday of the month beginning in January 2022, and the June 2022 meeting will be on the third Wednesday of the month.  A joint meeting of both townships will take place to discuss the purchase of a piece of property for expansion of the townships' cemetery.

This meeting lasted a little over an hour and a half.

Editorial Regarding Phone Answering Systems

December 8, 2021

This editor finds that these systems of "press 1 for this, press 2 for this," are the most frustrating and time consuming phone calls that can be made.  Here is the problem in a nutshell. 

I was on the telephone for 8 minutes in one of the answering systems, and throughout the entire time, never got to talk to a person.  The next step was to begin by choosing one of the options even if it did not match the problem that I was calling about.  I was then transferred to yet another place, and this one was not the correct one, and then I was transferred to yet another person, and waited on hold once again.  When they finally answered after almost ten minutes, I was told that I needed to speak to a supervisor, and I was transferred once again.  The supervisor did  not answer, and I was told to leave a short message and a return phone number, and the supervisor would return the call.

This call was made on Monday morning around 9 a.m., and it is now Wednesday morning, 48 hours later, and there has not been a return call to either my home phone or my cell number, even though both were given in the phone message.

The total time for this customer on the phone during the first phone call on Monday was just under 40 minutes, and the problem is still not resolved.

This consumer understands that the system is meant to make the call more efficient for the company.  Unfortunately, this is not more efficient for the consumer.  If the business did not have a monopoly on Beaver Island, I would switch to a different company.  There really isn't any excuse for this poor service as well as the lack of ANY customer service on this issue.

A second call had the same result as the first, but I hung up after getting the leave the message for the supervisor.  The most frustrating thing is that all I asked was for the telephone repairman give me a call to help me resolve, if possible, the issue without requiring a visit to my home.  And the "customer service" person said they would not do that, and the issue did not rise to the need of sending the repairman to my home.

I said, "Just have him call me or have him come to my house to resolve this problem," and they refused to do that.

Thank you so much, TDS Telecom, for your refusal to return the supervisor call and provide ANY customer service whatsoever for two days.  I don't really have the patience to go through the phone answering, delayed talking to a person, and the transfers a second time, but don't expect this customer to be as polite the third time the call is made after two days of no service whatsoever, and over an hour of wasted time for me, the customer.

This editorial has no intention of giving the telephone repairman anything except praise for his hard work.  This lack of service is all the fault of the company, and not this individual person.

There have been many calls made with the same situation over the last few weeks, but the service at all of them were less than superior, and mostly rated as less than acceptable.

I think the best business with the best answering system is Central Drugs in Charlevoix.  The options are not only the most common needs of anyone calling, but also allow two options of talking to a person.  Congratulations to Central Drugs for an efficient and effective system!

BI Christian Church Newsletter, December 2021

From Charlevoix County COA

November 29, 2021

Good Morning,

Just a note to keep you up to date on what is going on with the COA and to respond to requests for more information.  Please find attached the December 2021 Senior Hi-Lites NewsletterShould you have ANY questions about program requirements or qualifications, please contact Lonnie our Site Coordinator on Beaver Island or Sheri Shepard in the COA Office. 

We have had no one this month express interest in the Wellness Check program partnered with the Sheriff’s Department this month.

I just wanted to update you as to where we are here at the beginning of December regarding the Senior Centers in Charlevoix County.

We will continue to proceed out of an abundance of caution. We are going to keep all of our Senior Centers CLOSED to the public until the CDC and Health Department Numbers are back to safer levels.

We are still providing all of our services, just differently. I will be reviewing the CDC and Health Department numbers and levels each week to determine a new reopening timeline and keep you updated when we are closer to a more reasonable date.  Please see find attached our menu for September as meals can be picked up curbside.

We are so excited to share that each of our Senior Centers in Boyne, Charlevoix and East Jordan have added in person activity in the morning and in the afternoon. This is in addition to all of our other services we are currently providing....differently.

ALL of these scheduled activities REQUIRE preregistering with the Site Coordinator at the location and at this time, are FREE of charge and all those who CHOOSE to participate in these activities must wear a face mask covering your nose and mouth as we are still at a HIGH rate of transmission for COVID-19.

If you do not want to wear a mask, please be patient and wait until we are able to open our senior centers fully to participate.

We are comfortable offering these options to combat the feelings of isolation and loneliness as there is now a Vaccine available and treatments for COVID -19 should you CHOOSE to access them.

Our BI Office will be open by appointment only and masks will be required.

Volunteer services will be suspended at this time until the numbers get to a safer level.

Please be patient, kind and support our staff so that we can continue to support you with our services by staying healthy.

Please call your Site Coordinator for the most current information.

Meals and Activities are all subject to change due to the current COVID19 Pandemic numbers, statistics and protective measures for our aging adults and staff.

Please do not come to the Senior Center or offices if you are sick, this includes curbside pick up.  The impact of a sick individual in our centers could shut down services if our staff gets sick and are unable to provide those services.  You can still be sick and spread the COVID19 virus if you are vaccinated.

Please print our Calendars, “Like” our Facebook Page “Charlevoix County Commission on Aging”, follow us on Instagram “Charlevoixcountycoa” and look all the other goings on either on the Senior Hi-Lites Newsletter page or the Menus / Calendars and Activities pages of our website at www.charlevoixcounty/Commission_on_Aging .

Beaver Island COA Office Updates:

The BI COA Office is located at 26466 Donegal Bay Rd will now be open daily with new protocols in place for the safety of those visiting and our staff.  The phone number is 231-448-2124. 

Meal Voucher Program update:

Nutritional Program Participation for the following locations has been approved by the Charlevoix County Commissioners

The Bodega – Has expressed interest in our program and are reviewing the process.

As a reminder, only Charlevoix County Tax paying residence are allowed to participate in the BI Voucher Meal Program because the taxes that are paid by you and should be used by you.  A big thank you to our participating restaurants who immediately notified us of a couple who fraudulently got vouchers.  This allowed us to make no more were issued.  Please continue to discourage this kind of behavior from your visitors. 

Amy Wieland

Executive Director

Charlevoix County Commission on Aging

Work Phone: 231-237-0103

Email: wielanda@charlevoixcounty.org

Address: 13513 Division Street, Charlevoix, MI  49720

Changing what aging looks like and feels like in Charlevoix County!

View/download Sernior Highlights HERE

5 Great Reasons to Give to GLIA!

Reason #1: Did you know? Since 2017, the Great Lakes Islands Alliance has been connecting islanders and amplifying their voices. As core functions, GLIA hosts robust Zoom discussions every month plus the annual Great Lakes Islands Summit. Our membership is now over 150 people from 18 different islands - the crown jewels of the Great Lakes!

Give Today!

Hello,

The Great Lakes Islands Alliance is undertaking our first-ever fundraising effort. Help us grow!

Our fundraising needs include:

  • Great Lakes Islands Summit: help us keep costs down!
  • GLIA staffing (salaries and travel): We would personally like to visit each of your islands, meet other important community leaders, and share your community with GLIA and our growing network. 
  • Projects: We'd like to support new projects identified by GLIA members to benefit your island schools, businesses, non-profits, governments, and citizens. 
  • Contracts / licenses: The cost of growth includes technology, consultants, and more.

Please consider making a tax-deductible donation today by clicking the button below!

Thank you for your support, 

GLIA Steering Committee and Partners 

Donate to GLIA Today!

Fun Fact:

The typical (median) year-round population of our islands is 500 people, ranging from roughly 60 (Bois Blanc Island) to 13,255 (Manitoulin Island). Cumulatively, the population of the Great Lakes Islands is around 25,000! Thousands of additional people are summer residents or day visitors. That could be quite a voice!

More information: www.GLIAlliance.org or phuston@glialliance.org

 

"The Great Lakes Islands Alliance (GLIA) is supported by The Stewardship Network (TSN), an award-winning 501(c)3 non-profit organization. TSN is GLIA’s Fiscal Agent and provides fiduciary services on behalf of the Alliance. All contributions are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law."

 

Grief and Bereavement

November 22, 2021

The presentation took place at the Gregg Fellowship Center, was arranged by the Beaver Island Rural Health Center, and was very informative and helpful.  The wonderful food was also not only delicious, but also excellent.  There were full sandwiches of either roast beef or veggies, homemade chicken noodle soup, a delicious salad with a homemade salad dressing; all of this was delicious.  Many thanks to Narhyn Johnson , the whole arrangement and decor was warm and embracing .The arrangement of the tables and chairs as well as the backdrop of the presentation location were professionally set up and organized.  Good job by all those involved in this program!

There was an equal number of viewers of the live stream by Beaver Island TV and Beaver Island News on the 'Net as there was in attendance.  Just under forty people were participating either in person or online viewing.  The presenter did an excellent job of including those present into his presentation and allowed the interactions and statements. 

David Behling, a "Spiritual Advisor and Bereavement Counselor," began the interactive presentation at about 6:15 p.m., and it lasted a little over an hour.  The input from the attendees was valuable to all those present or watching live. 

The backdrop for the presenter and his slides

David Behling

View pictures of the slides shown HERE

View video of the presentation HERE

Handouts:

Children and Grief

Critical Incident Stress Info

Grief A Normal Response to Loss

Grief at the Holidays

Grief Overload

Grieving, Most Profound Emotional Pain

No Cellphone Signal and Access Issues

November 5, 2021

Some people are concerned about the lack of cellphone coverage on Beaver Island.  There was a situation that occurred tonight that demonstrated the real issue, but luckily it was not a life and death situation, and luckily there was no lack of individuals to drive to get help.  The editor came upon two people with a dog that were walking north on the South End Road.  They were walking trying to get a cell signal because their van was stuck and buried up to the axle.

They had Verizon, but there was a very spotty signal at their location. The editor volunteered to drive up the roadway until there was a good signal and place a phone call for them to get them some help.  After driving a quarter to a third of a mile up the road, a signal was obtained, and the phone call was made.  Two actually were made.  One to the person that they wanted called and one to the deputy to follow up and make sure that they got out.

It is interesting to the editor that the sole purpose of the drive was to verify the locations where there was the cellphone signal capable of actual communications.  The comparison between the cellphone coverage area for AT and T, the 800 Mhz coverage, and the cellphone coverage for Verizon.  Interestingly enough, the car was stuck at a location with absolutely no coverage by any cellphone or 800 Mhz based upon the maps and the actual check of cellphone signal.

Everywhere from the Southhead Lighthouse and up the West Side Road, there was nothing but spotty coverage with not real communication possible.  This is a concern to this editor, expecially with more and more people living down in these locations.  It is also a concern since there currently seem to be no phone lines available for TDS Telecom house phones either. 

So, the editor went for the almost four hour drive to check out these areas and then took the time to put the information on a map provided by CCE Central Dispatch.  The code is really not complicated.  The areas where there is no ATT coverage are marked by ATT with line through it.  The areas with no Verizon coverage are marked by a V with a line through it.  The areas where there is a Verizon signal are marked by a V with circle around it. 

Even though the map is not a real fancy creation, it certainly shows that the communication issues on part of Beaver Island are very serious, and they need to worked on, especially in the area of public safety and any kind of search and rescue, including water rescue and shoreline search.  Hopefully, someone will take some time to verify these issues with communication, and then work to make certain that the issues are resolved.

Here is the map that took almost five hours of work to accomplish.  Hopefully someone who needs to see it, will see it, and then DO something about it.

Beaver Island Transfer Station Winter Hours

November 1, 2021

Beginning today, November 1, 2021, the transfer station hours are from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m.  The transfer station is closed on Sundays and on holidays.

BITA Meeting Dates for 2021-2022

View/download this information HERE

CHARLEVOIX COUNTY TRANSIT BEAVER ISLAND SERVICE


OCTOBER 1, 2021 - JANUARY 2022
MONDAY - FRIDAY
11:00 AM - 2:00 PM*
*PREMIUM SERVICE IS AVAILABLE OUTSIDE OF POSTED BUSINESS HOURS
(BASED ON DRIVER AVAILABILITY)

FARES:
ADULTS 60+ RIDE FREE (THANK YOU COA)
ADULTS 19-59 $2.00/ONE WAY TRIP
YOUTH 3-18 $1.50/ONE WAY TRIP
DISCOUNTED FARE $1.00/ONE WAY TRIP *CCT REDUCED FARE PAPERWORK MUST BE ON FILE

PREMIUM FARES:
FIRST PASSENGER $5.00/ONE WAY TRIP
EACH ADDITIONAL PASSENGER $3.00/ONE WAY TRIP
*PREMIUM FARES ARE FOR ALL AGE GROUPS/NO DISCOUNTS

To reserve a ride, please call 231.582.6900 between 7:30am-4:30pm.

Medical appointments should be scheduled at least 3 days in advance.
Deliveries should be scheduled at least 1 day in advance.

DELIVERIES CANNOT INTERFERE WITH PASSENGER SERVICE AND WILL BE SCHEDULED WHEN TIME PERMITS.

A Video from the Past

copyright 2004 by Phillip Michael Moore

About seventeen years ago, the director of Beaver Island EMS was Joe Moore. His son Phillip Michael Moore was in a Master's Degree program in Broadcast and Cinematic Arts at Central Michigan University in Mt. Pleasant. It just so happened that the video project for his degree was to be a documentary about BIEMS and the need for a local air ambulance. His video was very professionally done.

It also happened that his grandfather, Phil Gregg, happened to have a heart attack while Michael was on the island filming for this documentary. Lots of volunteer EMS people are shown in this video, along with some of the patients, of course with their permission. The documentary was completed in 2004, prior to the second paramedic class taught on Beaver Island, so some of the current EMS providers were not in this documentary.

At the time of the filming, BIEMS was a volunteer EMS agency with people getting paid only a small amount for each emergency to help cover their gas expenses for participating in an emergency call. Some of them are listed here: Jim Stambaugh, Tim McDonough, Cindy Cushman, Gerald LaFreniere, and others. The "32 Miles of Water" title of the documentary referred to the miles from Beaver Island to the mainland hospitals of Charlevoix and Petoskey.

The Beaver Island community is so fortunate to now have Island Airways with a FAA certified air ambulance that has been operating for more than ten years now. At the time this video was made, the only emergency flights were done by Northflight EMS out of Traverse City, Michigan, or the US Coast Guard helicopter, also out of Traverse City. Sarah McCafferty was the EMS director and then Danielle Dedloff when the BIEMS licensed the Welke Aviation 866JA Britten Norman Islander aircraft with the State of Michigan as an air transport vehicle under the BIEMS agency license. This is the most efficient method of getting a patient off Beaver Island and to a hospital when an emergency occurs.

The concern 17 years ago was the time necessary to get the patient to the mainland hospital with the Golden Hour being the popular EMS period of getting the patient to the operating room within this 60 minute period of time. With the flight time from Traverse City to Beaver Island being almost an hour, this Golden Hour was taken up just getting the aircraft here. Now, with the Island Airways aircraft here on the island, the time to Charlevoix Airport or Harbor Springs Airport is less than 20 minutes or less than half the time to get the plane to the island from Traverse City.

The modern advanced life support agency, completed by a locally based air transport capability makes the island quite capable of transporting a patient within this Golden Hour, but only if the local aircraft and local pilot are available. Thank you, Paul Welke and Island Airways for you commitment to helping BIEMS accomplish this goal.

This video is seventeen years old, or thereabouts, but the accomplishments can still be applauded. Great job and thank you to all the volunteers that allowed this service to accomplish many successes. It has only been four and half years that the BIEMS is now a paid paramedic ALS agency, and the same challenges are still with us here today. The work of all those in the past to get this system set up in an efficient manner cannot be ignored. Great job to all the volunteers!

View this documentary from 2004 HERE

Transfer Station Website Up and Running

August 19, 2020

View the website HERE

The Founding Documents for the Airport Commission

The Intergovernmental Agreement

The Rules for Procedure

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