B. I. News on the 'Net, July 31-August 6, 2017

Mass from Holy Cross, 9:30 Sunday

This Sunday morning marks two years that BINN has been live streaming Mass from Holy Cross. The original reason for this is to provide those who can't physically be on the island and opportunity to view a little piece of home, and for those that can't physically attend the church service. This is the reason for all of the many areas of live streaming that BINN participates. This morning we had a visiting priest, Peter Lawrence, who visited Holy Cross last year fairly soon after his ordination. He is visiting the island from Lansing Diocese.

Today, Deacon Jim Siler announced that he will be ordained in forty days right here on Beaver Island at Holy Cross. He stated that he had permission from the bishop to announced this, this weekend. There should be a press release coming from the Diocese as early as tomorrow.

Father Lawrence

View a small gallery of pictures HERE

View video of the service HERE

Phyllis' Daily Weather

August 6, 2017

Clear skies this morning, 60°, wind is at 5 mph from the SW, humidity is 92% so it's a bit muggy, pressure is steady at 29.95 inches, visibility is 5.8 miles, UV levels are at 7, and pollen levels are medium at 6.4.
TODAY: Partly sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Isolated showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon. Highs in the lower 70s. Light winds becoming north at 10 mph in the afternoon.
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy. Isolated showers and thunderstorms in the evening. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. Northeast winds at 10 mph with gusts to around 25 mph.
MARINE REPORT:
TODAY: Northwest wind 5 to 10 knots becoming northeast in the morning, then becoming north in the afternoon. Partly cloudy. Waves 2 feet or less.
TONIGHT: Northeast wind 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 20 knots. Partly cloudy. Waves 2 feet or less.

ON THIS DATE of August 6, 1945 - The American B-29 bomber, known as the Enola Gay, dropped the first atomic bomb on an inhabited area. The bomb named "Little Boy" was dropped over the center of Hiroshima, Japan. An estimated 140,000 people were killed. (8:16am Japanese time)

DID YOU KNOW THAT hippopotamuses have killed more people in Africa than any other animal?

WORD OF THE DAY: filipendulous (fi-li-PEN-juh-luhs) which means hanging by a thread. From Latin filum (thread) + pendere (to hang). Ultimately from the Indo-European root (s)pen- (to draw, to spin), which is also the source of pendulum, spider, pound, pansy, pendant, ponder, appendix, penthouse, depend, and spontaneous. Earliest documented use: 1864.

Sports Boosters' Car Wash

August 5, 2017

View a small gallery of pictures HERE

Video clip

 

Phyllis' Daily Weather

August 5, 2017

Clear skies this morning, 58°, wind is at 17 mph from the NW, humidity is at 84%, pressure is rising from 29.85 inches, visibility is 8.3 miles, UV levels are high at 7, and pollen levels are rated medium at 5.7.
TODAY: Partly sunny highs in the lower 70s. Northwest winds 10 to 15 mph. Gusts up to 30 mph in the morning.
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy. A 20% chance of showers after midnight. Lows in the mid 50s. Southwest winds to 10 mph. Gusts up to 20 mph in the evening.
MARINE REPORT: Small Craft Advisory Until Noon Today
TODAY: Northwest wind 10 to 20 knots becoming west 5 to 10 knots in the afternoon. Gusts up to 25 knots. Slight chance of showers early in the morning. Waves 3 to 5 feet subsiding to 2 feet or less in the afternoon.
TONIGHT: West wind 5 to 10 knots. Mostly cloudy. Waves 2 feet or less.

ON THIS DATE of August 5, 1833 - The village of Chicago was incorporated. The population was approximately 250. Within seven years it grew to more than 4,000 people.

DID YOU KNOW THAT an average person will spend 25 years asleep?

WORD OF THE DAY: barbados ((bar-BAY-doz) which means to forcibly ship someone to another place to work. After Barbados, an island country in the Caribbean, formerly a British colony. Between 1640 and 1660 thousands of Irish people were sent by the British as indentured servants to work in Barbados and elsewhere in the Caribbean. The name of the island is from Portuguese/Spanish barbados (bearded ones). It’s not clear whether this refers to the people, the appearance of the dense vegetation, or something else. Earliest documented use: 1655.

Whiskey Point Fresnel Lens on Display

The fresnel lens on display.

The fresnel lens was removed from the Whiskey Point Light last year and moved over to the St. James Township Hall. (http://beaverislandnewsarchives.com/Beaver%20Island%20News/SubNews/July%2018-31,%202016.html down at the bottom of the page.) As you may have previously read on BINN, the St. James Township Board had set aside the corner of the building at the St. James Hall that faces the entry into the harbor as a location for the removed lens from the Whiskey Point Light. Tony Connaghan built a nice display area in the corner of the building with a bay window. (This was reported on BINN when the work was completed. http://beaverislandnews.com/SubNews/June%2012-25,%202017.html) Just this week, Kurt Fosburg of Superior Lighthouse Restoration came to the island and cleaned the lens, placed the lens in the room designed for the lens, and placed a small lamp in the lens.

Elaine West and Kathleen McNamara have been working hard on this project since the LED lights in the tower replaced the fresnel lens. The lighthouse work was started by Don Vyse, and these ladies did the follow up work on the lens. The lens is now ready to be viewed by anyone interested by walking up the handicapped ramp on the side of the building closest the Coast Guard Boat House, which is now CMU's research facility.

The LED light in the tower now.

Three different views of the fresnel lens

Southhead Light and Lighthouse in Disrepair

An editorial plus information by Joe Moore

(Contact has been made by BINN to both school districts involved and the Michigan Historical group.)

(Lots of pictures included in this PDF)



It wasn’t that long ago that I drove by the lighthouse at the south end of the island and noticed water coming out the front porch door of the house itself.  Since I am getting older, I don’t remember when this was, but I immediately called someone about this.  I then went back down there a few days later, and the water was still coming out the door.  I made a second phone call to a friend that I know had been working down there before the Lighthouse School closed.  Then I forgot about this situation, putting it out of my memory.

The editor would be happy to hear from anyone regarding this issue, but especially those that are working toward fixing the issues shown in the pictures.

Phyllis' Daily Weather

August 4, 2017

It's looking to be another damp day. Right now I'm showing partly cloudy skies, 65°, wind at 5 mph from the west, humidity is at 97%, pressure is steady at 29.57 inches, visibility is 6.5 miles, UV levels are low at 2, and pollen levels are also low/medium at 2.5.
TODAY: Partly sunny with a 20% chance of rain showers. Highs in the lower 70s.
TONIGHT: Mostly clear. lows in the mid 50s.
MARINE REPORT: there is a Gale Warning In Effect from 2 PM This Afternoon to 2 AM Saturday.
TODAY: Southwest wind 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 25 knots becoming west 10 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots in the afternoon, then becoming northwest 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 35 knots early in the evening. Patchy fog through the day. Slight chance of waterspouts in the afternoon. showers and a chance of thunderstorms. Waves 2 feet or less building to 4 to 6 feet.
TONIGHT: Northwest wind 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 35 knots. Slight chance of waterspouts and patchy fog. Chance of showers and slight chance of thunderstorms. Waves 6 to 9 feet.

ON THIS DATE of August 4, 1922 - The death of Alexander Graham Bell, two days earlier, was recognized by AT&T and the Bell Systems by shutting down all of its switchboards and switching stations. The shutdown affected 13 million phones.

DID YOU KNOW THAT dragonflies have 6 legs but can't walk? They weren't built for walking. They use their legs for grabbing, and holding onto, things like flower stems, cattails, small tree branches... That's how they rest. They were built for flying since they eat flying insects like mosquitos.\

WORD OF THE DAY: debunk (di-BUNGK) which means to expose the falseness of a claim, myth, belief, etc. After Buncombe, a county in North Carolina. In 1820, Felix Walker, a representative from that area, made a pointless speech in the US Congress. While his colleagues in Congress urged him to stop and move to vote on an issue, Walker claimed that he had to make a speech “for Buncombe”. Eventually, “Buncombe” became a synonym for meaningless speech, became shortened to “bunkum”, and then to “bunk”. And if there’s bunk, it’s one’s duty to debunk. Earliest documented use: 1923.

Vincent Rice, RIP

Vincent passed away unexpectedly on Wednesday, August 2, 2017 in Louisville, Kentucky. Age 30 years. He was born June 2, 1987 in Bay City, Michigan. Vincent was a member of Corpus Christi Parish-Holy Trinity Church and was a member of the Knights Columbus #414. He worked for many years in the Construction industry.

He is survived his father and step mother, Kevin and Judith Rice of Bay City; his mother Bonnie Cull-Rice and her special friend, Mike Migut; his sister Bridget (Craig) Hannenberg, their children, McKenna Claire and Kaleigh Maeve, his brother, Kevin Rice Jr. his step sisters and brothers, Angela (Joseph) Eisenman and Family of Midland, Amy Kolak (Dan Kosuch) and Family of Mt. Pleasant , SC, Marty (Becky) Kolak and Family of Bay City, Melissa (Brent Vrable) and family of Bay City; his uncles and aunts, Fred Rice of Boston, MA, Tom and Patty Rice of Pentwater, MI, Linda Rice of Las Vegas, NV, Sara Rice of Kalamazoo, Sally Walczak of Bay City, Patricia and Randy Cox of Auburn, Nancy (Paul) Madaj of Scottsdale, AZ, Dale and Nancy Cull, Dennis Cull and his special friend Noel Echhorn, Carly Bell, Mary and Dave Van Den Bosch; Jim and Mary Ann Cull , Julie and Mike Cherry , Peggy and Gary Bowersock, John Cull and his special friend, Linda Serva. He was preceded in death by his grandparents, Wilfred and Helen Rice, Raymond J. and R. Claire Cull, his step grandmother, Frances Debo, his uncles, Paul Rice, Steve Walczak and Michael Cull.

The Funeral Liturgy and Rite of Committal will be celebrated Monday, August 7, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. at Corpus Christi Parish-Holy Trinity Parish. The celebrant will be Rev. Fr. Robert J. Kelm with cremation following. The family will be present at the Gephart Funeral Home, Inc. on Sunday to received family and friends from 2:00 to 8:00 p.m. The Vigil for the Deceased will take place Sunday evening at 7:00 p.m. at the funeral home. Vincent will be taken to the church on Monday to lie state from 10:00 a.m. until the time of mass. Those planning an expression of sympathy may wish to consider donations to Wishes of the family.

BICS Board Meeting Packet

August 7, 2017

Transportation Authority

August 8, 2017 Meeting Notice and Agenda

Minutes from June 2017 Meeting

Phyllis' Daily Weather

August 3, 2017

New song perhaps - liquid sunshine on a cloudy day? Naw, guess it wouldn't work too well. Anyhow, right now we have mostly cloudy skies, 61°, wind is at 11 mph from the east, humidity is at 89%, pressure is steady at 30.03 inches, visibility is 6.1 miles, UV index is still high at 6, and pollen levels are medium at 6.8.
TODAY: Mostly cloudy. Slight chance of rain showers in the morning then a chance of rain showers and a N THISslight chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. Highs in the lower 70s. East winds 5 to 15 mph. Gusts up to 20 mph increasing to 30 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 50%.
TONIGHT: Rain showers likely and chance of thunderstorms in the evening then the same after midnight. Lows in the lower 60s. Southeast winds 5 to 15 mph with gusts to around 30 mph.
MARINE REPORT:
TODAY: East wind 10 to 15 knots. Gusts up to 20 knots in the afternoon. Slight chance of showers in the morning. Chance of showers and slight chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. Waves 2 feet or less.
TONIGHT: Southeast wind 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 20 knots. Showers and a chance of thunderstorms. Waves 2 to 3 feet.

ON THIS DATE of August 3, 1943 - Gen. George S. Patton verbally abused and slapped a private. Later, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower ordered him to apologize for the incident. I was interested in learning more about this so I googled it. Here's the rest of the story from findingdulcinea.com:

Lt. Gen. George S. Patton, commander of the Seventh U.S. Army, visited a military hospital in Sicily on Aug. 3, 1943. He traveled past the beds of wounded soldiers, asking them about their injuries. Coming to the bed of a soldier who lacked visible signs of injury, Patton inquired about his health.

The soldier, 18-year-old Pvt. Charles H. Kuhl, had been tentatively diagnosed as having a case of psychoneurosis. He told Patton that he couldn’t mentally handle the battle lines. “It’s my nerves,” he said. “I can hear the shells come over but I can’t hear them burst.”

Enraged, Patton slapped Kuhl across the face and called him a coward. As Patton left the tent, he heard Kuhl crying and turned back, striking the soldier again and ordering him to leave the infirmary tent. It later emerged that Kuhl had malaria and a high fever.

A week later, in a far less publicized incident, Patton slapped Pvt. Paul G. Bennet, who had been hospitalized for his “nerves.” News of both incidents reached Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, who on Aug. 17 sent a letter to Patton reprimanding him.

“I am well aware of the necessity for hardness and toughness on the battle field. … But this does not excuse brutality, abuse of the ‘sick,’ nor exhibition of uncontrollable temper in front of subordinates,” Eisenhower wrote.

Eisenhower ordered Patton to apologize to the men, but, feeling that he was too valuable a leader to lose, allowed to retain his command. Months later, on Nov. 21, radio broadcaster Drew Pearson revealed to U.S. audiences that Patton had slapped Kuhl. Many members of Congress and the press called for Patton’s removal from command, and outrage over the alleged “cover-up” was also widespread.

The Senate delayed Patton’s confirmation as major general and Eisenhower relieved him of his command of the Seventh Army. He would go on to serve as a decoy during the invasion of Normandy and be given command of the Third Army, which he brilliantly led in an Allied victory in the Battle of the Bulge.

DID YOU KNOW THAT one of baseballs worst promotions was a 10-cent beer night on June 6, 1974?

Who in their right minds would have come up with the idea of luring baseball fans and other drunkards into a ballpark with the promise of unlimited beer sold at a dime apiece? And who in their right minds would have said, What a great idea!

People in the Cleveland Indians’ front office, that’s who.

This concept wasn’t just misguided and stupid, it was flat-out dangerous. And it led to one of the ugliest episodes in modern baseball history, one that recalled the rowdy hooliganism of the 1890s.

Even before the 25,000 fans—double the season average at Cleveland Stadium—took their seats with their cheap beer, there was tension in the air between the Indians and the visiting Texas Rangers, who a week earlier engaged in a brawl-filled contest that itself had nearly turned into a riot in Arlington. Now it was Cleveland’s turn.

Throughout the game, drunken fans interrupted the game; some shed their clothes and streaked around the field, while others threw objects toward the players. Rangers first baseman Mike Hargrove, the future Indians manager, just missed getting nailed by a wine jug. (That, the Indians weren’t selling for a dime.) Inexplicably, Cleveland management did nothing to curb the growing alcohol-fueled antics of the fans, continuing to pour the beer with no increased security presence. Not even a bottom-of-the-ninth rally by the Indians that tied the game and put the winning run on second base could appease the rowdier fans, who by now must have been out of their inebriated minds. When Rangers outfielder and star hitter Jeff Burroughs had his cap swiped by an onrushing fan—and tripped in pursuit of him—Texas manager Billy Martin, no stranger to confrontation, said enough and ordered his team out of the dugout, bats in hand, to deal with the issue.

That only made things worse; on cue, a flood of fans entered the field in attack mode, and even the Indians—who a week earlier had made the Rangers their mortal enemies—decided it was time to come to the rescue of the Texas players. Numerous players from both teams were hit by objects and punches, though no one was seriously hurt. Umpire crew chief Nester Chylak had no choice but to declare a forfeit with the game tied 5-5. Only nine fans were arrested—but needless to say, seriously discounted beer was never, ever offered again at a major league ballpark.

WORD OF THE DAY: paladin (PAL-uh-din) which means
1) any determined advocate or defender of a noble cause.
2) any one of the 12 legendary peers or knightly champions in attendance on Charlemagne.

Paladin nowadays usually means “defender or advocate of a noble cause,” but it still retains its original meaning “any of the twelve peers of Charlemagne’s court or of his vassals.” One of the earliest applications of the word, if not the earliest, is to Roland of Brittany, who died in 778 a.d. at the Battle of Roncevaux Pass (or Roncesvalles) in the Pyrenees in the Basque region of Spain, and was immortalized in the “Chanson de Roland” (“Song of Roland”), which was composed c1100. Paladin ultimately derives from the Latin proper noun Palātium, the name of the chief hill of the seven hills of Rome and the site of the earliest Roman settlements. The Latin adjective and noun Palātīnus derives from the noun Palātium and means “pertaining to the Palatine hill, pertaining to the imperial palace; an officer of the imperial palace, chamberlain.” The post-Augustan Latin usage passed into Italian as paladino, which was adopted in Middle French as palladin, and through French into English. Paladin entered English in the late 16th century.

What Did You Say 53

by Joe Moore

One of my early-in-my-career former students came to do some work at my house today.  What the work is doesn’t really matter in this short story, but it was something that I couldn’t do by myself.  That’s the most important admission here.  While he was doing the work, he began to talk about the Baroque on Beaver concerts that were to take place this week, and that he had had a teacher many years ago that exposed him to classical music.  That story goes like this.

Two Hours of Nature

On a very interesting day on the loop from Carlisle Road to Barney's Lake and back on Sloptown Road, each of two trips on the same day lasted about an hour, thuse the title of the story. The camera and the video camera were ready, and sitting on the public access bench at Barney's or standing on the side of the road on Sloptown revealed that there is a lot going on in nature if we just take the time to sit and just look around. All of these picture reveal the chances of seeing the natural world on Beaver Island.

A fledging loon way down on the north side of Barney's Lake

An adult loon and a fledgling imitating 

Ducks taking a break

Caspian tern fishing on Barney's Lake

Doe with triplets near Barney's Lake

Osprey delivering food to the nest

Beautiful sunset sky over Barney's Lake

Arriving back at home, two slugs were caught in the middle of a mating ritual.

By the way, the slugs were moved since the window was getting nasty.

St. James Public Works Committee Meeting

Phyllis' Daily Weather

August 2, 2017

Mostly cloudy this morning, 65°, wind is at 10 mph from the NW, humidity is at 86%, pressure is rising from 29.99 inches, and visibility is 5.4 miles, UV levels are at 7, and the pollen levels are low to medium at 3.3.
TODAY: Partly sunny. Isolated showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon. Highs in the lower 70s. North winds at 15 mph.
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy. Isolated rain showers in the evening. Lows in the upper 50s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph with gusts to around 20 mph.
MARINE REPORT:
TODAY: North wind 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 20 knots. Scattered showers and thunderstorms early in the morning. Patchy fog in the morning. Waves 2 feet or less.
TONIGHT: Northeast wind 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 20 knots. Partly cloudy. Waves 2 to 3 feet.

ON THIS DATE of August 2, 1938 - Bright yellow baseballs were used in a major league baseball game between the Brooklyn Dodgers and the St. Louis Cardinals. It was hoped that the balls would be easier to see. From thisgreatgame.com comes the rest of the story:

When Ray Chapman was killed by a Carl Mays pitch in 1920, there was a huge push to always place a new ball in play because the fresh white ball would be brighter and easier to pick out of a background to reduce the possibility of a similar tragedy. But some wondered if that was good enough. A bright yellow baseball, which would really stand out, was experimented as early as the late 1920s and used on rare occasion over the next decade at the college level. Brooklyn Dodgers president Larry MacPhail, who was always looking for ideas to enliven the game, decided he would give the yellow ball a shot in the midst of the 1938 campaign.

The yellow ball had been devised by Frederick Ruhr, a “color scientist”—something that conjures up visions of guys in lab coats looking through microscopes at color charts. The idea was that the yellow ball would not only be safe for hitters but more visible for fielders—and it might promote more offense, something baseball owners always welcomed. And while the first two side effects were true, the third wasn’t; it was discovered that the ball’s yellow dye would start to run and make the ball moist—and therefore deader. Scoring didn’t jump through the roof when the Dodgers played the St. Louis Cardinals, nor did it in two additional games played over the next year with the yellow ball. Enthusiasm waned, and the yellow ball became a collector’s item.

As dark batting backgrounds became more of the norm at major league parks, it was determined that the white ball was fine enough, at least until irascible Oakland owner Charles Finley pushed for an orange ball early in the 1970s. It lasted one exhibition game before baseball shook its head no to the experiment.

DID YOU KNOW THAT blue whales are the largest animals ever known to have lived on Earth. These magnificent marine mammals rule the oceans at up to 100 feet long and upwards of 200 tons. Their tongues alone can weigh as much as an elephant. Their hearts, as much as an automobile.

WORD OF THE DAY: dorp (dawrp) which means a village; hamlet. Dorp means “village” in Dutch and is closely related to Old Norse, Old English, and English thorp “farmstead, hamlet, village,” and German Dorf (which may bring a smile of amusement to or elicit a snort of contempt from former GIs). Dorp occurs in the name New Dorp, a neighborhood on Staten Island (one of the boroughs of New York City), a derivation of Dutch Nieuw Dorp “New Village.” Dorp entered English in the 16th century.

20 Minutes with the BICS Superintendent/Principal

News on the 'Net had called the school and asked to interview the new principal/superintendent. This morning, Tuesday, August 1, 2017, the phone rang, and the new guy in town set up a 1 pm appointment for the interview.

His name is Wel Cwikiel. You can learn more about him by watching the two ten minute video clips completed today. He received is BA in English from the University of Michigan (UofM). He received an MS in Natural Resources from the UofM. He received an MS in Educational Leadership from Grand Valley State University, and his Education Specialist from the U of M.

Meet Wil Cwikiel HERE

Perfume Season

by Cindy Ricksgers

Phyllis' Daily Weather

August 1, 2017

Happy first day of August. Even though I missed a good share of it, this summer seems to be racing past. One thing I've learned is to just take a minute or two every single day to appreciate what's around you, who's in your life, and give thanks that you're still above ground.

Right now on the island I'm showing 67°, partly cloudy skies, wind is at 12 mph from the SW, humidity is at 90% making it a bit muggy, pressure is steady at 29.99 inches, visibility is 6 miles, UV is again very high at 8, and pollen levels are medium at 7.
TODAY: Mostly sunny. Highs around 80°. Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph with gusts to around 25 mph.
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms in the evening then mostly cloudy with a chance of rain showers and a slight chance of thunderstorms after midnight. Lows in the mid 60s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph. Gusts up to 20 mph in the evening.
MARINE REPORT:
TODAY: Southwest wind 5 to 10 knots. Gusts up to 20 knots in the afternoon. Sunny early in the morning then becoming mostly sunny. Waves 2 to 3 feet.
TONIGHT: West wind 5 to 10 knots. Patchy fog. Chance of showers and thunderstorms. Waves 2 to 3 feet.

ON THIS DATE of August 1, 1790 - The first U.S. census was completed with a total population of 3,929,214 recorded. The areas included were the present states of Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont and Virginia. Census data included the name of the head of the family and categorized inhabitants as follows: free white males at least 16 years of age (to assess the country's industrial and military potential), free white males under 16 years of age, free white females, all other free persons (reported by sex and color), and slaves.

DID YOU KNOW THAT at birth dalmations are always white? Despite being covered in spots in adulthood, puppies are born snow white. Pups generally don’t grow their trademark spots until about four weeks. This news might come as a shock as it directly negates what the Disney movie 101 Dalmatians might have suggested.

WORD OF THE DAY: anoesis (an-oh-EE-sis) which means a state of mind consisting of pure sensation or emotion without cognitive content. Anoesis is an uncommon noun, used mostly in psychology for a state of consciousness in which there is only sensation but no thought. The word is purely and obviously Greek: the first letter, a-, is called “alpha privative” (i.e., it expresses negation or deprivation) and is familiar in such words as atheist or agnostic. The alpha privative is related to Latin in-, as in insensible or indefensible, and to Germanic un-, as in English unhealthy or unusual. The main element is the Greek noun nóēsis “thought, intelligence” (and the opposite of aísthēsis “sense perception, sensation,” from which we have the word aesthetic). Nóēsis ultimately derives from the Greek noun nóos (noûs) “mind, wit.” Nous, rhyming with house, is a colloquialism in British English meaning “good sense, common sense, gumption.” Anoesis entered English in the early 20th century.

Vision Quest: World Class Carp Fishing on Beaver Island

View mynorth article HERE

Christian Church Bulletin

July 30, 2017

Phyllis' Daily Weather

July 31, 2017

What a beautiful weekend it was! I'm hoping that it will continue for several more days. Right now I'm showing 64°, clear skies, wind is at 3 mph from the west, humidity is at 92%, pressure is steady at 30.11 inches, visibility is 9.4 miles, UV levels are very high at 8, so slather on that sunscreen, and pollen levels are medium at 6.9.
Today: Mostly sunny. Slight chance of thunderstorms and isolated rain showers in the afternoon. Highs in the lower 80s. Northwest winds at 10 mph.
TONIGHT: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 60s. Light winds.
MARINE REPORT:
TODAY: Light winds becoming west 5 to 10 knots in the morning. Patchy fog early in the morning. Waves 2 feet or less.
TONIGHT: Southwest wind 5 to 10 knots. Mostly clear. Waves 2 feet or less.

ON THIS DATE of July 31, 1969 - A Moscow police chief reported that thousands of Moscow telephone booths had been made inoperable by thieves who had stolen phone parts in order to convert their acoustic guitars to electric.

DID YOU KNOW THAT Peanuts are one of the ingredients in dynamite? Dynamite is made from Nitroglycerine a highly volatile substance. Nitro (for short) is made by nitrating Glycerol, the Glycerol is made from Peanut oil.

WORD OF THE DAY: ergate (UR-geyt) which means a worker ant. Ergate comes from Greek ergátēs “worker,” a derivative of the noun érgon (also wérgon in some dialects) “work,” a straightforward development from the Proto-Indo-European root werg- “to work,” the same source as English work. Ergate entered English in the early 20th century.

July Video Report

There are three services that Beaver Island News on the 'Net uses to make video and news available. The total video usage this month has included 430 unique IP addresses viewing 2,257 video clips, and using bandwidth of 119.5 GB. Obviously, the live stream is done separately than the other two. This month of July 2017, the live stream has had viewing from 112 unique IP addresses with views of 190 during this month with bandwidth usage at 13.1 GB. The current video has had viewing by 285 unique IP addresses viewing 1983 video clips using bandwidth of 100.7 GB. The older video clips had viewing from 72 unique IP addresses viewing 84 clips using 5.8 GB of bandwidth.

This represents only the video and not the text, pictures, albums, and galleries on these three separate website addresses. Beaverislandnews.com had 1,085 unique visitors, viewing 6.866 pages during 4,934 visits. Beaverislandnewsarchives.com had 1104 visitors, viewing 3,162 pages during 2,059 visits. Beaverisland.tv had 300 unique visitors, viewing 1,253 pages, during 742 visits.

A Garden is Hope

by Cindy Ricksgers

Mass from Holy Cross, Sunday, 9:30 a.m.

July 29+30, 2017

Today was the fiftieth anniversary of Father John Paul's church back in his homeland. This made the day special, and there was special music as well with an added trumpet to the choir and the organ.

Saturday night lector John Fiegen...Sunday morning lector Patrick Nugent

Deacon Jim Siler read the Gospel for both services.

Father John Paul gave the sermon for both services.

Two other pictures from the service

View video of the service HERE

August Dinner on Saturday, 8/12/17

Please note that the August Dinner will be on SATURDAY this year! Bring on those ball players! Delicious meal for $14, homemade desserts included! Take-Out Orders Available!


AUGUST DINNER
Saturday, August 12, 2017
4:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Holy Cross Hall



Grilled Chicken, Mashed Potatoes, Cole Slaw, Corn, Rolls, and Homemade Desserts!

Adults $14.00
Children Under 12 $8.00

Come One! Come All!

***Proceeds to benefit Holy Cross Catholic Church.

     

Links

Cinematic Tour of Beaver Island

The Chamber of Commerce of Beaver Island has posted this, and BINN found it on facebook. It's a very nice video, viewable on YouTube.

View it here

Holocaust Survivor Martin Lowenberg

Video by Kaylyn Jones HERE

Airport Commission Meeting

April 1, 2017

View video of the meeting HERE

Emergency Services Authority

 

BICS Board Meetings

November 14, 2016

School Board Meeting Packet HERE

View video of the meeting HERE

 

Anti-Bullying Presentation to BICS Parents

View presentation HERE

St. James Township Meeting Video

April 5, 2017

View video of the meeting HERE

April 24, 2017, 7 p.m.

View a small gallery of pictures of the meeting HERE

View video of the meeting HERE

May 3, 2017

View video of the meeting HERE

June 7, 2017

View video of the meeting HERE

June 19, 2017

View video of the meeting HERE

Beaver Island Community Center

BEAVER ISLAND COMMUNITY CENTER

At the Heart of a Good Community

FALL HOURS
Effective Tuesday, 9/8/15
CLOSED Labor Day, 9/7 Happy Holiday!!
M-F 9am-5pm
Sat 9am-9pm
Sun – CLOSED
231 448-2022
beaverislandcommunitycenter.org

Check www.BeaverIslandCommunityCenter.org or the Community Center for listings

Link to the Beaver Island Airport 10-year Plan

On the Beach of Beaver Island

You will need Quicktime or another music player to enjoy this link.

The music played in the Holy Cross Hall in the late 70's and early 80's, recorded for posterity and shared here.

When Santa Missed the Boat to Beaver Island

as read by Phil Gregg

Click HERE

Meeting Minutes

The minutes of all public meetings will be posted

as soon as they are received.

News on the 'Net welcomes minutes to all public meetings. All organizations are welcome to submit meeting minutes for publication on this website. Please email them to medic5740@gmail.com.

Airport Committee Minutes

Beaver Island Cultural Arts Association Minutes

Beaver Island District Library Board Minutes

Peaine Township Board Minutes

BIRHC Board Meeting Minutes

St. James Township Meeting Minutes

Beaver Island Community School Board Meeting Minutes

Beaver Island Ecotourism Goals Draft, rev. 3, 19 Jan 2010

Beaver Island Natural Resources and Eco-Tourism Steering Committee Minutes

Beaver Island Transportation Authority Minutes

Joint Human Resources Commission Minutes

Waste Management Committee Minutes

Beaver Island Airport Commission Minutes New for 2011!

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What Did You Say 51

by Joe Moore

As you get older and have things get in the way of your dreams, the scanner can be an amazing friend in your exhaustion.  I just heard the local EMS get paged to the medical center for a patient having difficulty breathing.  The call went out with a page from Central Dispatch, the ambulance responded within a few minutes, the emergency response vehicle zipped in and arrived quickly.  Arrangements were made for the air transport aircraft, the patient was headed out to the airport and flown off quickly.  The patient was picked up in Charlevoix for a quick transport to Charlevoix Area Hospital.
Why a good thing?

Read the rest of the story HERE

Deputy Peacock and Mast

by Richard Burris

Deputy Peacock and Mast
By Dick Burris


Perkins:
We had a deputy called Peacock, that was a diver. He decided to make an underwater tow sled out of an old snowmobile. So he took out the motor, and made some up and down, and right/left steering fins for it.
One day he asked me if I would tow him on an experimental view of the bottomlands of the harbor area. Of course, thinking that it would be an interesting thing to do, went along with the idea. He hooked his sled to the stern post of the Burr-ls-Bell, and we commenced to cover the bottom, going about five mph.
Just for fun, he was towed toward. and angled into the the N4 buoy anchor chain, just out from the coast guard station. He at that point, abandoned the sled and came to the surface. By this time the sled was past the chain, so I waited until he had time to return to the sled, and proceeded to tow him back toward town.
We went on a course behind the boat, and yacht docks, "an interesting area, because of lost items that could be found there." Then we started up through the shallow channel leading to the Marina. This was the time of year that the seaweed was growing profusely. All of a sudden the boat seemed to slow down and the towline tightened like a " banjo stl ring" so thought I should stop and see what was causing it.
I then witnessed something that might appear in a science fiction movie, A huge wad of seaweed surfaced, with two arms flailing franticly, to extricate their body from it's mass entanglement of seaweed. The sled was brought to the surface and cleared of seaweed; and that was the last time that the sled was used to my knowlege.

Sailboat mast:
When we lived on Lake Geneserath, a friend and neighbor, knowing that I was a diver, asked me if we could find his sailboat mast, that had fallen into the lake.
So one morning Perry Fortier, my buddy and son in law, took the pram, towline and t ow-board to the neighbors cottage and he went with us to establish a search pattern.
The pattern started fairly close to shore, to zig zag, back and forth out into deeper water. On each turn the line would go slack, and I and the t ow-board would wait for the next movement forward on the bottom of the lake.
There were several runs and turns: on what happened to be the LAST turn, all stopped and off the left was the mast and sail.
So I swam over to it, and was going to just surface with it, when noticing the tow-board still on the bottom.

 The depth at this point was nearly forty feet deep, so I thought I'd surprise Perry with the intended "find".
Holding the tow-board in one hand, and pointing the mast upward with the other; I glided to the surface. As the mast started to rise at the surface, all motion stopped; Perry said he thought he was being approached by a submarine, seeing what appeared to be a periscope, ascending from the depths.

From Peaine Township

The following information was received today, July 28, 2017, in an email from the supervisor at 3:11 p.m. The other information about the ballot proposals were already posted by BINN below, so only the front page of the document is different than the ballot proposals already posted.

BIESA Meeting

July 27, 2017

The regular meeting of the BIESA took place at the Peaine Township Hall at 2 pm. yesterday. Four of the five authority members were present. There was no fire department representative present. The agenda is shown below on this page and included a backup plan presented by CCE (also below).

The authority board members

The CCE representatives

  1. Call to Order
  2. Review/revise agenda
  3. Approve Minutes from June 29, 2017 Regular Meeting
  4. Approve Minutes from July 13, 2017 Special Meeting.
  5. Report by Greg Clark, Assistant Director, of the C.C.E/9-1-1 Central Dispatch Authority, update on work completed since June Meeting.
  1. Reports
    1. Fire
    2. EMS - Directors Report:

Billing
Runs
EMT Course Update and National Testing
Status of the old E-Car

  1. Report on DBA for Fire Department and status of bank account and fund transfer.
  2. Report on transfer of insurance from St. James Township to ESA
  3. RFP for audit of 2016-2017 fiscal year
  4. Status of responses to RFP to provide Emergency Medical Service on Beaver Island
  5. Public Comment

View the video of this meeting HERE

Plants Bulletin

Includes an excellent article "The Case of the Stolen Beaver Slippers" by Beth Leuck about the Lady Slippers on the island.

St. James Public Works Committee Meeting

Baroque on Beaver Schedule of Events

Even though the Beaver Island Cultural Arts Association did not send their list of events to BINN this year, as a former BICAA board member, the editor supports their efforts to bring the music to Beaver Island. If BINN was allowed to live stream these events, every single one of them would be available to all those unable to be at the performances including those physically unable to get to them. At this point, no cameras of any kind are allowed according to their website, so live streaming or even photographs are not welcome. Nevertheless, here is the scanned schedule of events for the next twelve events.

TDS Planning to Improve Internet Access

BINN received an email from the Chamber of Commerce that came from TDS. This email suggested that the Internet access for most people on Beaver Island would be improved. BINN has contacted TDS to verify and gather more information before posting this email. Beaver Island definitely needs improved Internet speed and broadband access, but timelines are needed, and more specific information is needed. For example, what has been done already? What is the time frame for the improvement? Will this improvement be enough to take care of the needs of the current residents and future residents? What will be the cost of the improvements? Will those with much lower speeds have some improvement? If so, how much?

These and other questions have been asked in an email to the contact mentioned in the email. Here is a copy of that email:

"MADISON, Wis. (July 14, 2017) – Construction is now under way to expand and improve broadband to 671 locations in Beaver Island, Mich. TDS Telecom (TDS®) began work in January with the work expected to be completed in early 2018.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) allocated $3.3 million to reach residents in some of the hardest to serve areas in Michigan. The funding will also be used to maintain a voice and broadband network as well as building out to these locations. The FCC’s Alternative Connect America Cost Model (A-CAM) will provide funding to 671 locations on Beaver Island.

Michigan residents can visit the TDS website to find out how this federal program may impact their location. 

Depending on location, most TDS customers in eligible rural areas will receive guaranteed broadband speeds of 25Mbps download and 3 Mbps upload (25/3). Under the agreement with the FCC, the remaining customers will receive broadband service at lower speeds of 10/1 and 4/1Mbps.

“We are excited to start work on this project to move faster connections to customers in Beaver Island,” said Jean Pauk, manager – State Government Affairs at TDS. 

In January, TDS announced it elected to receive approximately $75.1 million a year to increase broadband access in 25 states from the FCC’s A-CAM, under the Connect America Fund (CAF) program. TDS will leverage the funds over the next 10 years to support the buildout of rural broadband networks to nearly 160,000 locations across the country.

TDS has been doing business in Michigan since 1982 and owns five telephone companies in the state. TDS employs 66 people in Michigan.

Media contact:  Cheryl McCollum, Associate Manager of Public Relations / 608-664-2388 / cheryl.mccollum@tdstelecom.com"

Another news release:

"Construction to expand, improve broadband to 671 locations in Beaver Island begins, work expected to be completed in early 2018
MADISON, Wis. (July 14, 2017) – Construction is now under way to expand and improve broadband to 671 locations in Beaver Island, Mich. TDS Telecom (TDS®) began work in January with the work expected to be completed in early 2018.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) allocated $3.3 million to reach residents in some of the hardest to serve areas in Michigan. The funding will also be used to maintain a voice and broadband network as well as building out to these locations. The FCC’s Alternative Connect America Cost Model (A-CAM) will provide funding to 671 locations on Beaver Island.

Michigan residents can visit the TDS website to find out how this federal program may impact their location. 

Depending on location, most TDS customers in eligible rural areas will receive guaranteed broadband speeds of 25Mbps download and 3 Mbps upload (25/3). Under the agreement with the FCC, the remaining customers will receive broadband service at lower speeds of 10/1 and 4/1Mbps.

“We are excited to start work on this project to move faster connections to customers in Beaver Island,” said Jean Pauk, manager – State Government Affairs at TDS. 

In January, TDS announced it elected to receive approximately $75.1 million a year to increase broadband access in 25 states from the FCC’s A-CAM, under the Connect America Fund (CAF) program. TDS will leverage the funds over the next 10 years to support the buildout of rural broadband networks to nearly 160,000 locations across the country.

TDS has been doing business in Michigan since 1982 and owns five telephone companies in the state. TDS employs 66 people in Michigan.

Media contact:  Cheryl McCollum, Associate Manager of Public Relations / 608-664-2388 / cheryl.mccollum@tdstelecom.com

Here is the map of Beaver Island showing where the improvements are supposed to be made:

The blue areas are those that are supposed to be improved.

BICS Special Committee Meetings and Reschedule August Meeting

Announcements/Ads

Island Treasures Resale

On Tuesday, June 6, 2017,  the Resale Shop will welcome donors and shoppers at noon as we begin our summer schedule. The summer schedule is Tuesdays through Saturdays from noon until 4:00.

Charlevoix County COA Senior Highlights

June 2017

BICS Committee Meeting Schedule

BIESA Meeting Schedule

Fiscal Year 2017-18 Meeting Schedule

 

Holy Cross Bulletin for

June 2017

 

Christian Church Bulletin

July 30, 2017

BICS Calendar 2017-18

HSC Meeting Dates Schedule


BI Airport Commission Meeting Schedule

Bank Hours Change


January thru April
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
9am-1pm

May thru June
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9am-1pm

July thru August
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9am-3pm

September thru October
Monday Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9am-1pm

November thru December
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
9am-1pm

Island Treasures Resale Shop

We will be open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from noon until 4:00. During those hours we will gladly accept your "gently used, barely used, like new " items. Please be sure that your donations be in season, clean, and in good repair. Thank you for your support !

Open for shopping and donations

If you need help with your donation, call the shop at 448-2534

or Donna at 448-2797.

Donate to the Food Pantry

Use this button below to donate to the Food Pantry.

Donation goes to the Christian Church Food Pantry--Click the Donate Button on the far left and above.


Donate to the Live Streaming Project

 

The Live Streaming Project includes BICS Sports Events, Peaine Township Meetings, Joint Township Meetings, and much more.

Your donation may allow these events to be live streamed on the Internet at http://beaverisland.tv

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