B.I. News on the 'Net, May 22-28, 2017

Phyllis' Daily Weather

May 28, 2017

Got out of bed to a gigantic rumble of thunder which frightened the dogs. Right now it's raining, I'm showing 56°, wind at 8 mph from the SW, humidity is at 81%, pressure is steady at 29.75 inches, and visibility is 9.4 miles. Today: Mostly cloudy. Scattered rain showers in the morning then rain showers likely and a slight chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. (thunderstorm is directly overhead at the moment). Highs in the upper 60s. Light winds becoming west 5 to 10 mph with gusts to around 20 mph in the afternoon. Tonight: Mostly cloudy with a slight chance of rain showers and isolated thunderstorms in the evening then partly cloudy with a slight chance of rain showers after midnight. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the upper 40s. Southwest winds at 10 mph. Gusts up to 20 mph after midnight.
MARINE REPORT: Today: Light winds becoming southwest 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 20 knots in the afternoon. Becoming variable 10 knots or less early in the evening. Chance of showers in the morning. Rain showers likely and a slight chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon. Patchy fog in the morning. Waves 2 feet or less. Tonight: Southwest wind 5 to 10 knots. Patchy fog. Slight chance of showers. Waves 2 feet or less.

On this date of May 28, 1961 - Amnesty International, a human rights organization, was founded. (from amnesty.org:)

"In 1961, British lawyer Peter Benenson was outraged when two Portuguese students were jailed just for raising a toast to freedom. He wrote an article in The Observer newspaper and launched a campaign that provoked an incredible response. Reprinted in newspapers across the world, his call to action sparked the idea that people everywhere can unite in solidarity for justice and freedom.

This inspiring moment didn’t just give birth to an extraordinary movement, it was the start of extraordinary social change.

'Only when the last prisoner of conscience has been freed, when the last torture chamber has been closed, when the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights is a reality for the world’s people, will our work be done.'
Peter Benenson, Amnesty International founder

Over the years, human rights have moved from the fringes to centre stage in world affairs.

Amnesty has grown from seeking the release of political prisoners to upholding the whole spectrum of human rights. Their work protects and empowers people - from abolishing the death penalty to protecting sexual and reproductive rights, and from combatting discrimination to defending refugees and migrants’ rights. They speak out for anyone and everyone whose freedom and dignity are under threat.

Did you know that 'Topolino' is the name for Mickey Mouse Italy?

Word of the day: hedonism (HEED-n-iz-uh m) which means devotion to pleasure as a way of life. Hedonism is a modern word derived from Greek hēdonḗ “pleasure, enjoyment.” The Greek noun derives from the Greek root hēd- (and hād- and hwād- in dialects). The Greek roots reflect the Proto-Indo-European root swād- “sweet, pleasant,” represented in Latin by suāvis “sweet” and suādēre “to persuade,” and in Germanic by Old English swēte (modern English sweet), Old High German swuozi (modern German süss). Hedonism entered English in the 19th century.

Birding Peru; Penguins to Piping Guans with Brian Allen

This program took place Saturday, May 27th at 4:30 p.m. in the Hangout of the Beaver Island Community Center. Brian Allen spoke to a group of just under twenty today with emphasis on the beauty of Peru and the many birds that are quite unique there.

Brian Allen

View a small gallery of pictures HERE

Video of the presentation will be available when processed.

BI Development Corporation Raffle

Vacations, Vacations, Vacations...

Phyllis' Daily Weather

May 27, 2017

Mostly cloudy skies, 48°, wind is at 2 mph from the SW, humidity is at 98%, pressure is steady at 29.90 inches, and visibility is 7.4 miles. Today: Partly sunny. Patchy fog. Highs in the lower 70s. West winds at 10 mph. Tonight: Mostly clear in the evening then mostly cloudy with a 40% chance of rain showers after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. Northwest winds at 10 mph shifting to the southeast with gusts to around 20 mph after midnight.
MARINE REPORT: Today: Light winds becoming west 5 to 10 knots in the afternoon. Patchy fog early in the morning. Waves 2 feet or less. Tonight: Southeast wind 5 to 10 knots. Chance of showers. Waves 2 feet or less.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt announces a state of unlimited national emergency in response to Nazi Germany’s threats of world domination on this day in 1941. In a speech on this day, he repeated his famous remark from a speech he made in 1933 during the Great Depression: the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

On this date: (from history.com)
In a radio address delivered from the White House, FDR tried to rally isolationists to his philosophy that aid to Europe was purely in America’s self-interest. In March 1941, he had successfully pushed through the Lend-Lease Bill, which gave military aid to any country vital to the defense of the United States. Roosevelt recounted for his audience how German submarines were boldly attacking British shipping and threatening American shipping in the Atlantic and how Londoners endured nightly raids of German bombers. He painted an almost apocalyptic vision of a Nazi-controlled Western Hemisphere where American workers would be enslaved by Germany, godless Nazis would outlaw freedom of worship and America’s children would wander off, goose-stepping in search of new gods.

Roosevelt also took pains to define what he meant by America being attacked. He insisted that an attack on the United States can begin with the domination of any base which menaces our security, for instance Canada, Brazil or Trinidad, and not just when bombs actually drop in the streets of New York or San Francisco or New Orleans or Chicago. He appeared to be urging Americans to consider actively engaging in the war in Europe stating it would be suicide to wait until they are in our front yard.

FDR then laid out his administration’s policy with regard to the current war in Europe. Without committing troops, he promised the protection of shipping in the Atlantic, continued humanitarian and military aid to Britain, the establishment of a civilian defense and warned of saboteurs and fifth columnists (communist infiltrators) who threatened democracy in America and abroad. He also condemned war profiteering and urged organized labor to resist disruptive strikes in war-production industries.

Finally, FDR warned Germany that the U.S. was prepared to go to war in case of attack and pledged to strengthen America’s defense to the extreme limit of our national power and authority.

Just over seven months later, the United States entered World War II after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

Did you know that a crocodile cannot stick its tongue out, because it is attached to the bottom of its mouth. This is why they appear to gulp their food down.

Word of the day: winsome (WIN-suh m) which means sweetly or innocently charming; winning; engaging. Winsome comes from a Proto-Indo-European root wen-, won- (with other variants) originally meaning “to strive, work hard for” but developing the senses “to desire, love, please.” In Latin the root appears in venus “love (romantic, sexual), Venus (goddess and planet)"; even the month April was called veneris mēnsis “month of Venus.” (Roman scholars thought, wrongly, that venus came from the verb venīre “to come” because “love comes to all.”) Venus is related to German wünschen and Old English wӯscan “to wish.” Other derivatives of the root in Old English include winnan “to strive after,” wine “friend,” and the noun wynn or wen “joy, pleasure.” Wynn is also the Old English name for the rune ƿ, representing the sound w and later replaced by uu ("double u") and still later by w. Winsome entered English before 900.

Eagle and Osprey Presentation, 5 p.m., May 26th

Jerry Weinrich

Approximately forty adults attended the Eagle and Osprey presentation today at 5 p.m. at the Community Center, upstairs in the Hangout. The room was pretty full, and the presentation was made by a very knowledgeable man who has been doing the Eagle studies for forty years. The presenter was Jerry Weinrich, a retired DNR wildlife biologist. His presentation included several pictures of eagle nests from above. These were taken while they were doing the surveys for the studies. They flew over looking for nests, and then flew over again to see how many eaglets were in the nest.

The majority of the presentation was about eagles with just a short presentation on ospreys. He noted that Beaver Island is the only Great Lakes island with a pair of nesting ospreys.

View a gallery of photos HERE

View video of the presentation HERE

BICS Weekly Update

May 29-June 2

BICS Calendar 2017-18

Short Walk at Gull Harbor

May 26, 2017

Carp in the ponds along with a snake

A walk along the trail at Gull Harbor revealed lots of birds, some which were too quick to capture on the camera. In addition to the birds, the new growth of vegetation was revealed along with the moving life in the pond.

View a gallery of photos HERE

Memorial Day

We want to thank Alvin Lafreniere, Dave and Sharon Blanchard and Brian Gallagher for their efforts to place American flags at the gravesites of over 130 veterans at the two cemeteries on Beaver Island.    Also the AMVETS want to thank Michele Grooters for placing fresh flowers at these same veterans graves.

No breakfast this year but there will be a Memorial Day service at the Veterans Park on Monday at 11:00 AM

Bob Tidmore

AMVETS Post 46

Interesting Facts

BINN posted 10,968 individual pictures and pdf's during the calendar year of 2015. These picutres were just deleted off the computer today. Last year of 2016, there were over 5000 unique IP addresses that viewed videos recorded and live streamed by BINN with over 36,000 clips viewed. This year so far as of May 26, 2017, the videos have been viewed by over 1700 unique IP addresses with over 11,000 clips viewed.

The live streaming has mostly been limited to Mass from Holy Cross in May 2017, but this allowed 42 unique IP addresses and individuals to view the masses from Beaver Island..

The plans for live streaming include the birding presentations and continue with the Mass from Holy Cross that we have been doing for over a year now.

The recorded video just yesterday, May 25, 2017, included two hours of the cyber security presentation, approximately two hours of the BIESA meeting, the arrival of the BIEMS emergency response vehicle, and the video of the taste testing of the new dishes for the opening of the Circle M. Most of the day was spent either recording the video or processing and posting the video and pictures, about twelve hours of work. One busy day it was!

Phyllis' Daily Weather

May 26, 2017

Special thanks to my friend, Patsy McCauley, for allowing me to share her post.

Here's some ground rules for Memorial Day Weekend.

1. Don't wish me a Happy Memorial day - there is nothing happy about brave men and women dying for their country.

2. Its not a holiday or a sale, its a day of remembrance of our fallen Military, period.

3. You want to know the true meaning of Memorial Day, visit your local National Cemetery or VA Hospital, not Disneyland or the mall to grab a sale.

4. Don't tell me how great anyone in political power is, tell me about Chesty Puller, George Patton, John Basilone, Mitchell Paige, Ira Hayes, Chris Kyle, Matt Axleson, Danny Dietz, Christopher Walsh and Michael Murphy...Don't recognize them? That's easy, plug their names into Google and be prepared to be amazed and honored at their exploits.

5. Don't tell me I don't know what I am talking about, I have carried the burden all too many times for my fellow warriors who now stand their post before God.

6. Say a prayer, and then raise a glass and thank God for the men and women who have paid the ultimate price and who are no longer here.

7. The time to thank a Veteran is in November on Veteran's Day.

God Bless America and her Fallen.

On to the weather: at the moment I'm showing 46°, feels like 44°, mostly cloudy skies, wind is at 4 mph from the NW, humidity is at 95%, pressure is rising from 29.83 inches, and visibility is 7.5 miles. Today: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly sunny. Areas of fog in the morning then patchy fog in the afternoon. Highs in the mid 60s. Northwest winds at 10 mph. Tonight: Partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s. Light winds.
MARINE REPORT: Today: West wind 5 to 10 knots. Areas of fog early in the morning, then patchy fog. Waves 2 feet or less. Tonight: Light winds. Areas of fog. Waves 2 feet or less.

On this date of May 26, 1868 - U.S. President Andrew Johnson was acquitted, by one vote, of all charges in his impeachment trial. (From history.com:)

"At the end of a historic two-month trial, the U.S. Senate narrowly fails to convict President Andrew Johnson of the impeachment charges levied against him by the House of Representatives three months earlier. The senators voted 35 guilty and 19 not guilty on the second article of impeachment, a charge related to his violation of the Tenure of Office Act in the previous year. Ten days earlier, the Senate had likewise failed to convict Johnson on another article of impeachment, the 11th, voting an identical 35 for conviction and 19 for acquittal. Because both votes fell short–by one vote–of the two-thirds majority needed to convict Johnson, he was judged not guilty and remained in office.

At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, Johnson, a U.S. senator from Tennessee, was the only senator from a seceding state who remained loyal to the Union. Johnson’s political career was built on his defense of the interests of poor white Southerners against the landed classes; of his decision to oppose secession, he said, “Damn the negroes; I am fighting those traitorous aristocrats, their masters.” For his loyalty, President Abraham Lincoln appointed him military governor of Tennessee in 1862, and in 1864 Johnson was elected vice president of the United States.

Sworn in as president after Lincoln’s assassination in April 1865, President Johnson enacted a lenient Reconstruction policy for the defeated South, including almost total amnesty to ex-Confederates, a program of rapid restoration of U.S.-state status for the seceded states, and the approval of new, local Southern governments, which were able to legislate “black codes” that preserved the system of slavery in all but name. The Republican-dominated Congress greatly opposed Johnson’s Reconstruction program and passed the “Radical Reconstruction” by repeatedly overriding the president’s vetoes. Under the Radical Reconstruction, local Southern governments gave way to federal military rule, and African American men in the South were granted the constitutional right to vote.

In March 1867, in order to weaken further Johnson’s authority, Congress passed the Tenure of Office Act over his veto. The act prohibited the president from removing federal office holders, including cabinet members, who had been confirmed by the Senate, without the consent of the Senate. It was designed to shield members of Johnson’s cabinet, like Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, who was appointed during the Lincoln administration and was a leading ally of the so-called Radical Republicans in Congress. In the fall of 1867, Johnson attempted to test the constitutionality of the act by replacing Stanton with General Ulysses S. Grant. However, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to rule on the case, and Grant turned the office back to Stanton after the Senate passed a measure in protest of the dismissal.

On February 21, 1868, Johnson decided to rid himself of Stanton once and for all and appointed General Lorenzo Thomas, an individual far less favorable to the Congress than Grant, as secretary of war. Stanton refused to yield, barricading himself in his office, and the House of Representatives, which had already discussed impeachment after Johnson’s first dismissal of Stanton, initiated formal impeachment proceedings against the president. On February 24, the House voted 11 impeachment articles against President Johnson. Nine of the articles cited his violations of the Tenure of Office Act; one cited his opposition to the Army Appropriations Act of 1867 (designed to deprive the president of his constitutional position as commander in chief of the U.S. Army); and one accused Johnson of bringing “into disgrace, ridicule, hatred, contempt, and reproach the Congress of the United States” through certain controversial speeches.

On March 13, according to the rules set out in Section 3 of Article I of the U.S. Constitution, the impeachment trial of President Johnson began in the Senate. U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase presided over the proceedings, which were described as theatrical. On May 16 and again on May 26, the Senate voted on the charges brought against President Johnson. Both times the vote was 35 for conviction and 19 for acquittal, with seven moderate Republicans joining 12 Democrats in voting against what was a weak case for impeachment. The vote fell just short of a two-thirds majority, and Johnson remained in office. Nevertheless, he chose not to seek reelection on the Democratic ticket. In November, Ulysses S. Grant, who supported the Republicans’ Radical Reconstruction policies, was elected president of the United States.

In 1875, after two failed bids, Johnson won reelection to Congress as a U.S. senator from Tennessee. He died less than four months after taking office, at the age of 66. Fifty-one years later, the U.S. Supreme Court declared the Tenure of Office Act unconstitutional in its ruling in Myers v. United States."

Did you know that Ralph Lauren's original name was Ralph Lifshitz? At the age of 16, Ralph and his brother Jerry changed their last name to Lauren after having been teased consistently at school. Another brother, Lenny, retained the family name.

Word of the day: krummholz (KROOM-holts) which means stunted trees near the timber line on a mountain. From German, from krumm (crooked) + Holz (wood). Earliest documented use: 1908.

Circle M Opening Friday, May 26th

Tonight, May 25, 2017, the Circle M chefs, the Runberg boys Josh, John, and Dan;, prepared the new dishes for the rest of the help, so they would all have an idea of what the dishes looked like and how they tasted. The new items of food are absolutely amazing. There wasn't one single dish that this editor liked better than another. They all have their unique flavors, and the dishes look amazing. The Circle M opens tomorrow, May 26th, at 5:30 p.m. for the summer season.

Video with Josh, Dan, and Brighet 

The new dishes

Hawaiian Tuna dish.......Cheese dish.......Chicken Parmesan

Beef tips........Mack'n'cheese bites........Cowboy Burger

BIESA Meeting

May 25, 2017

View a small gallery of pictures HERE

View video of this meeting HERE

Cyber Security Presentation

May 25, 2017

Beginning at about 10 a.m. this morning, Christopher Sorensen, was on the island to help anyone who had questions about this topic. Ransomware, hackings and identity theft are everyday news it seems.
Most of us know someone who's email or facebook was hijacked. Many of us have experienced fraudulent credit card activity. And who hasn't forgotten their password?

Chris Sorensen, Senior Cyber Security Researcher for GE Digital brought his 10-plus years as a Cyber Security Specialist to Beaver Island for some informational sessions with the BICS students (at the school), and Island Seniors and community at large (at the BIC Center).

In short, he teaches people how to prevent identity theft, secure their home networks, avoid online scams, and protect themselves and their family on the internet.

Chris speaks regularly about technology issues and writes a monthly column for the local newspaper. “Tech Time” features tips and tricks for keeping your family safe and secure on the Internet. See some examples here: http://www.trentontrib.com/?s=Sorensen

View a small gallery of pictures HERE

If you missed the round-the-coffee-table cyber discussion, you can view video of the entire presentation here on News on the 'Net.

View video of the presentation HERE

BIEMS Gets Emergency Response Vehicle Today

May 25, 2017

This emergency resonse vehicle for the paramedics arrived on today's Emerald Isle ferry trip with the boat arriving at approximately 1:45 pm. Down to the meet the ferry were Brian Meade and Cody Randall. Brian Meade needed to leave before the vehicle came off the ferry due to the BIESA meeting at 2 p.m. This vehicle was purchased with grant moneys from the Grand Traverse Band and Charlevoix County Community Foundation. More information on this will be provided at a later date.

 

The new echo car

View a small gallery of pictures HERE

Phyllis' Daily Weather

May 25, 2017

(Obviously I slept in) Right now I'm showing overcast skies, 54°, wind at 7 mph from the NE, humidity is at 91%, pressure is steady at 29.67 inches, and visibility is 9.6. Today: Mostly cloudy with scattered rain showers. Highs in the lower 60s. Northeast winds 5 to 15 mph. Tonight: Mostly cloudy with isolated rain showers. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows around 50°. North winds at 10 mph. Gusts up to 20 mph in the evening.
MARINE REPORT: Today: Northeast wind 5 to 10 knots. Scattered showers. Waves 2 feet or less. Tonight: North wind 5 to 10 knots. Patchy fog. Isolated showers. Waves 2 feet or less.

On this date of May 25, 1977 - An opinion piece by Vietnam veteran Jan Scruggs appeared in "The Washington Post." The article called for a national memorial to "remind an ungrateful nation of what it has done to its sons" that had served in the Vietnam War.

Did you know that ... well not exactly a "did you know" but I came across 50 interesting plant facts and since I thought it was interesting I decided to share (from funfactsabout.net:)

An average size tree can provide enough wood to make 170,100 pencils!

The first type of aspirin, pain killer and fever reducer came from the tree bark of a willow tree!

85% of plant life is found in the ocean!

Bananas contain a natural chemical which can make people feel happy!

Brazil is named after a tree!

The Amazon rainforest produces half the world’s oxygen supply!

Cricket bats are made of a tree called Willow and baseball bats are made out of wood Hickory tree!

Dendrochronology is the science of calculating a tree’s age by its rings!

Caffeine serves the function of a pesticide in a coffee plant !

Apple is 25% air, that is why it floats on water!

Peaches, Pears, apricots, quinces, strawberries, and apples are members of the rose family!

Apple,potatoes and onions have the same taste, to test this eat them with your nose closed!

The tears during cutting an onion are caused by sulfuric acid present in them!

The tallest tree ever was an Australian eucalyptus – In 1872 it was measured at 435 feet tall!

The first potatoes were cultivated in Peru about 7,000 years ago!

The evaporation from a large oak or beech tree is from ten to twenty-five gallons in twenty-four hours!

Strawberry is the only fruit that bears its seeds on the outside.
The average strawberry has 200 seeds!

Leaving the skin on potatoes while cooking is healthier as all the vitamins are in the skin!

Around 2000 different types of plants are used by humans to make food!

Small pockets of air inside cranberries cause them to bounce and float in water!

Bamboo is the fastest-growing woody plant in the world; it can grow 35 inches in a single day!

A sunflower looks like one large flower, but each head is composed of hundreds of tiny flowers called florets, which ripen to become the seeds!

Cabbage has 91% water content!

Banana is an Arabic word for fingers!

The California redwood (coast redwood and giant sequoia) are the tallest and largest living organism in the world!

Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) is one of the oldest living tree species, it dates back to about 250 million years ago!

The word pineapple comes from European explorers who thought the fruit combined the look of a pinecone with flesh like that of an apple!

The Elephant grass found in Africa is named so as it is 4.5 meters high and even elephants can hide in it!

Eating lots of onions will make you sleepy, as it acts as a sedative!

A cucumber is a fruit and not a vegetable since it has seeds in the centre!

A cluster of bananas is called a hand and consists of 10 to 20 bananas known as fingers!

Vanilla flavouring comes from the pod of an orchid, Vanilla planifolia!

The first certified botanical garden was founded by Pople Nicholas III in the Vatican City in 1278 AD!

There are over 300,000 identified plant species and the list is growing all the time!

Oak trees are struck by lightning more than any other tree!

Carrots were originally purple in colour!

During the 1600s, tulips were so valuable in Holland that their bulbs were worth more than gold. The craze was called tulip mania and caused the crash of the Dutch economy!

The baobab tree found in Africa can store 1,000 to 120,000 litres of water in its swollen trunk!

Oak trees don’t produce acorns until they are 50 years old!

Caffeine serves the function of a pesticide in a coffee plant!

At over 2000 kilometres long, The Great Barrier Reef is the largest living structure on Earth!

The first product to have a bar code was Wrigley’s gum!

Word of the day: comfort (kuhm-fert) which means to soothe, console, or reassure; bring cheer to. Late 13c., conforten "to cheer up, console," from Old French conforter "to comfort, to solace; to help, strengthen," from Late Latin confortare "to strengthen much" (used in Vulgate), from Latin com-, intensive prefix (see com- ), + fortis "strong" (see fort ). Change of -n- to -m- began in English 14c.

Weather by Joe

May 25, 2017

Right now at 8 a.m., it's 54 degrees with a pressure of 29.68 and visibility of ten miles. It's overcast with clouds at 8000 feet. The dewpoint is 52 degrees with the humidity at 96%. The forecast is for rain at 60% chance decreasing to 30% by four p.m. With the forecast suggesting that the occasional rain will end a little before 3 p.m.

Charlevoix County COA Senior Highlights

June 2017

Island Treasures Resale

On Tuesday, June 6, 2017,  the Resale Shop will welcome donors and shoppers at noon as we begin our summer schedule. The summer schedule is Tuesdays through Saturdays from noon until 4:00.

Flags for Memorial Day

View a gallery of photos HERE

View video of the two cemeteries with Kate Smith singing "God Bless America"

Thanks to Brian and Dee Gallagher for some of these pictures.

Green Project Named for Joyce Bartels

View story HERE

"HASLETT, Mich. (WLNS) – It’s a way to save energy and money…but for the Haslett Community Church, installing a solar panel roof means a whole lot more than just “going green” especially for Elizabeth Bartels."

Daddy Franks Opens

Daddy Franks Restaurant and Ice Cream Parlor opened today, May 24, 2017, at 11 a.m. There are several items new on the menu as well as a new breakfast menu. There are also new flavors of ice cream.

Ben Delamater and Kathie Ehinger

Two of the out-front workers

Kathie Ehinger talks about Daddy Franks opening

 

Phyllis' Daily Weather

May 24, 2017

... and it's raining, and doing it well. I'm showing 48°, feels like 44°, wind is at 8 mph from the east, humidity is at 97%, pressure is steady at 29..72 inches, and visibility is 7 miles. Today: Mostly cloudy. Rain shower likely in the morning then a chance of rain showers in the afternoon. Highs in the lower 60s. Northeast winds 5 to 15 mph. Tonight: Mostly cloudy. Slight chance of rain showers in the evening then a chance of rain showers after midnight. Lows in the the lower 50s. Northeast winds 5 to 15 mph.

MARINE REPORT: Today: Nirtheast wind 5 to 10 knots. Chance of showers. Waves 2 feet or less. Tonight: Northeast wind 5 to 10 knots. Chance of showers. Waves 2 feet or less.

On this date of May 24, 1883 - After 14 years of construction the Brooklyn Bridge was opened to traffic. (from wikipedia and history.com) Construction of the bridge began in 1869. The bridge was initially designed by German immigrant John Augustus Roebling, who had previously designed and constructed shorter suspension bridges, While conducting surveys for the bridge project, Roebling sustained a crush injury to his foot when a ferry pinned it against a piling. After amputation of his crushed toes he developed a tetanus infection which left him incapacitated and soon resulted in his death in 1869, not long after he had placed his 32-year-old son Washington Roebling in charge of the project.

The bridge's two towers were built by floating two caissons, giant upside-down boxes made of southern yellow pine, in the span of the East River, and then beginning to build the stone towers on top of them until they sank to the bottom of the river. Compressed air was pumped into the caissons, and workers entered the space to dig the sediment, until the caissons sank to the bedrock. The whole weight of the bridge still sits upon a 15-foot thickness of southern yellow pine wood under the sediment.

Many workers became sick with the bends in this work. This condition was unknown at the time, and was first called "caisson disease" by the project physician Andrew Smith. Washington Roebling also suffered a paralyzing injury as a result of decompression sickness shortly after ground was broken for the Brooklyn tower foundation on January 3, 1870. Roebling's debilitating condition left him unable to physically supervise the construction firsthand.

As Chief Engineer, Roebling supervised the entire project from his apartment with a view of the work, designing and redesigning caissons and other equipment. He was aided by his wife Emily Warren Roebling who provided the critical written link between her husband and the engineers on site. Under her husband's guidance, Emily studied higher mathematics, the calculations of catenary curves, the strengths of materials, bridge specifications, and the intricacies of cable construction. She spent the next 11 years assisting Washington Roebling, helping to supervise the bridge's construction. When iron probes underneath the caisson for the Manhattan tower found the bedrock to be even deeper than expected, Roebling halted construction due to the increased risk of decompression sickness. He later deemed the aggregate overlying the bedrock 30 feet (9 m) below it to be firm enough to support the tower base, and construction continued.

After 14 years and 27 deaths while being constructed, the Brooklyn Bridge over the East River opened, connecting the great cities of New York and Brooklyn for the first time in history. Thousands of residents of Brooklyn and Manhattan Island turned out to witness the dedication ceremony, which was presided over by President Chester A. Arthur and New York Governor Grover Cleveland.

On May 24, 1883, Emily Roebling was given the first ride over the completed bridge, with a rooster, a symbol of victory, in her lap. Within 24 hours, an estimated 250,000 people walked across the Brooklyn Bridge, using a broad promenade above the roadway that John Roebling designed solely for the enjoyment of pedestrians.

Did you know that lemons contain more sugar than strawberries? Lemon is sour because it also contains 3-6% citric acid, which dominates its sweetness and tastes sour.

Word of the day: cantankerous (kan-TANG-ker-uh s) which means disagreeable to deal with; contentious; peevish. Cantankerous sounds as apt in sound and meaning as honk or boom. One earlier spelling of the word is contankerous, which suggests its development from Middle English contak, conteke “quarrel, disagreement,” from which are formed contecker, contekour “one who causes dissension.” An unattested adjective conteckerous, contakerous could have been formed on the models of traitorous or rancorous or contentious. Cantankerous entered English in the 18th century.

Still in the Garden

by Cindy Ricksgers

Phyllis' Daily Weather

May 23, 2017

Patchy fog this morning, it's 42°, wind is at 2 mph from the east, humidity is at 98%, pressure is steady at 29.81 inches, and visibility is 1.3 miles. Today: Partly sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. A 50% chance of rain showers in the afternoon. Highs in the lower 60s. Northeast winds at 10 mph. Tonight: Mostly cloudy with a 50% chance of rain showers. Lows in the upper 40s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.

MARINE REPORT: Today: Light winds becoming northeast 5 to 10 knots in the morning. Areas of fog early in the morning, then patchy fog in the morning. Slight chance of showers in the afternoon. Waves 2 feet or less. Tonight: Northeast wind 5 to 10 knots. Chance of showers. Waves 2 feet or less.

On this date of May 23, 1873 - Canada's North West Mounted Police force was established. The organization's name was changed to Royal Canadian Mounted Police in 1920.(from rcmp-grc.gc.ca:)

Born out of a need for a national police force to implement the law in Canada's newly acquired western territories, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has evolved into a world-renowned organization of more than 28,000 people.

In May 1873, the Parliament of Canada established a central police force, and sent 150 recruits west to Manitoba. The new police force gradually acquired the name "North-West Mounted Police" (NWMP).

In July 1874, the Mounted Police, now numbering 275 members, marched west, headed for southern Alberta, where American whisky traders were operating among the Aboriginal people.

The officers established a permanent post at Fort Macleod, Alberta, where approximately half of the Force was posted. The remaining members were either sent to Fort Edmonton or to Fort Pelly, Saskatchewan, which had been designated as headquarters.

The following summer, the Mounted Police established Fort Calgary, on the Bow River in Alberta, and Fort Walsh, in Saskatchewan's Cypress Hills.

By 1885, the Force had grown to 1,000 men, but in 1896 its future was threatened by the newly elected Prime Minister, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, who wanted to reduce and eventually disband the NWMP. However, support for the Force in the West prevailed, and it gained new prominence policing the Klondike Gold Rush.

In 1904, King Edward VII conferred the title of "Royal" upon the North-West Mounted Police.

The years following World War II saw a continued expansion of the RCMP's role as a provincial force. In 1950, it assumed responsibility for provincial policing in Newfoundland and absorbed the British Columbia provincial police.

Women were first accepted as uniformed members in 1974. The 70s also brought an expansion of responsibilities in areas such as airport policing, VIP security and drug enforcement.

In 1989, the RCMP participated in its first United Nations mission, sending 100 police officers to Namibia to monitor national elections.

Today, the RCMP's scope of operations includes organized crime, terrorism, illicit drugs, economic crimes and offences that threaten the integrity of Canada's national borders. The RCMP also protects VIPs, has jurisdiction in eight provinces and three territories and, through its National Police Services, offers resources to other Canadian law enforcement agencies.

Did you know that 11% of people are left handed? I came across some interesting facts about lefties at leftyfretz.com:
* Left Handed Pens are a thing! Who knew!?
*Make especially good baseball players, tennis players, swimmers, boxers and fencers (almost 40% of the top tennis players are lefties)
*Celebrate left handed day once a year – August 13th – International Left Handers Day
*Draw figures facing to the right
*Recover from strokes faster
*More likely to pursue creative careers
*Of the eight most recent U.S Presidents, 4 have been left handed
*Left handed college graduates go on to become 26% richer than right handed graduates
*On a QWERTY keyboard there are 1447 English words typed solely with the left hand, whilst only 187 are typed with the right hand.

Word of the day: memoriter (muh-MAWR-i-ter) which means 1) by heart; by memory 2) involving or requiring memorization. Memoriter is as rare in English as it is in Latin. In Latin memoriter is an adverb meaning “from memory, by personal recollection” and derives from the adjective memor “mindful, remembering” (also the source of the Latin noun memoria “memory”). All of the Latin words are (partially) reduplicated derivatives of the root mer- (and its variants) “to remember, care for.” This same reduplicated root is the source of Mímir (also Mim) “(the) Rememberer,” in Norse mythology a giant who guarded the well of knowledge and wisdom. The simple, unreduplicated root is the source of English “mourn” (from Old English murnan “to be anxious about, care for”). Memoriter entered English in the 17th century.

Birding Presentations Changed

(Note changes below)

All presentations take place at the Community Center. No registration is required for presentations, free, and appropriate for all age groups.

The festivities begin on Friday night, May 26th at 5 p.m.: “Michigan Eagles and Ospreys, A Bird's Eye View” presented by Jerry Weinrich at 5 p.m.

Jerry Weinrich will speak on his dream job conducting a census of the eagle and osprey populations in the Northern Lower Peninsula. As a wildlife biologist for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment for 30 years, Jerry has the distinction of coordinating the longest-running, large scale census of eagles and ospreys anywhere in the country. He has produced amazing aerial views, not only of nests with fledglings inside, but birds in flight as well. The eagle population, Weinrich says, is on the rise — up from 30 nesting pair in the Lower Peninsula when he started to 407 now. There are about 120 pair of nesting osprey, he said. Currently, Beaver Island is the only Great Lakes Island with a pair of nesting Osprey.
Weinrich hopes those who attend will walk away from the program with an appreciation of how well the eagles are doing.
Moved to Saturday:
Saturday, May 27th at 4:30 p.m.-Birding Peru; Penguins to Piping Guans with Brian Allen. In the Spring of 2010, Brian was invited to Peru on a trip sponsored by Kolibri Expeditions to explore the feasibility of doing ecotourism in the Satipo Valley in the east central region of the Andes Mountains. Brian says that this program will show some of the stunning scenery and some of the scariest roads for birding he has ever experienced! He will take us to some of the last retreats of the Black-spectacled Brush Finch, the endemic Pardusco, and the gorgeous Golden-backed and Yellow-scarfed Tanagers.

Sunday, May 28th at 1 p.m.-Penguins and Prions: Birds and Wildlife of the Seventh Continent presented by Cathy Theisen. The continent of Antarctica is a fascinating, uninhabited land of ice and snow. Not a single land mammal lives here, although it boasts a rich collection of both bird and marine mammal life. Join Dr. Cathy Theisen on the trip of a lifetime to the bottom of the globe, and learn about the fascinating animals and the adaptations that allow them to live here. Examine some of the effects of human disruption, and some of the greatest restoration successes of this fragile wilderness.

Moved to Sunday, May 28th:
From 4:30 - 5:30 p.m., the BIBT festivities will include Birding 101 presented by Darrell Lawson.

Interested in exploring skills helpful to beginning birders? Join Darrell Lawson, President of the Petoskey Audubon Club, for a beginning birding presentation at the Community Center. Darrell will cover field guide selection, optics selection, tips for learning bird songs, bird habitats, and identification pitfalls to avoid. Darrell is an avid birder who loves sharing his passion.

More information on the speakers and events can be found on http://www.beaverislandbirdingtrail.org

National EMS Week 2017

"EMS STRONG: Always in Service"

Presented by American College of Emergency Physicians in partnership with the National Association of EMT's (NAEMT), is May 21 - 27.

Monday is “Education Day” to highlight both public education programs and EMS provider education.

Tuesday is “Safety Tuesday” to promote Safety for the EMS provider, the patient, and the public.

Wednesday remains as “EMS for Children Day”, to highlight the special needs of caring for children.

Thursday is “Save-A-Life Day”, promote “Stop the Bleed” citizen bleeding control education, “Until Help Arrives” active bystander training, public CPR programs, and other related education program.

Friday is “EMS Recognition Day”, to recognize your local EMS heroes and those saves by the EMS system. 

History of EMS Week

The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) was instrumental in establishing EMS Week when President Gerald Ford declared November 3 – 10, 1974 as the first “National Emergency Medical Services Week.” This annual observance continued for four more years and was then reinstituted by ACEP in 1982. Around this time the observance of EMS Week was moved to September. In 1992 EMS Week was again moved to be the 3rd week in May. The move was made to separate EMS Week from Fire Prevention week in October. The rationale for the move was the majority of fire and EMS services felt having the two events back to back hurt the effectiveness of each program so EMS Week was moved to May.

ACEP began collecting and distributing ideas and information for EMS Week in the early 1980’s. Professionally printed and prepared EMS Week Planning kits were developed starting in the late 1980’s. Today 25,000 EMS Week Planning Guides are distributed free of charge to EMS services, fire departments, rescue squads, volunteer groups, and emergency departments across the country. The 48 page guide contains ideas for local EMS Week activities and highlights EMS Week programs held by EMS services during the previous year.

BINN will gladly cover any events planned to recognize the local EMS providers if made aware of these events.

What Did You Say 16

by Joe Moore

(In honor of EMS Week, these stories represeent the driving force of EMS to help our local community with state-of-the-art emergency medical treatments. Both stories represent true circumstances of early, special protocols developed for and by Beaver Island EMS to be positioned to help our patients.)

Historically, the local public safety people are all members of the community, and have been throughout the years.  Even when the deputy is sent over to the island, they become members unless they purposely don’t develop any relationships.  The rest are volunteers and have been for over thirty years here on Beaver Island.


One of the deputies that moved his family to the island spent eleven years here.  He established an auxiliary program with the blessing of the Charlevoix County Sheriff.  Part of this was due to the isolation of the deputy and the difficulty of getting him or her any help from the mainland during specific, quick developing situations.  This was part of the reason that I fit the bill for an auxiliary member.  A second reason was my previous experience with the former deputy, who has established a rescue boat for the island.  I had also been an auxiliary officer, but not officially appointed under this previous deputy.  In order to be officially appointed, I was required to go over and be interviewed by the sheriff himself, and required to pledge my loyalty to the department under his administration.

Read the rest of the story HERE

Weekly Rollover Plus

by Joe Moore

As some of you know, there are lots of things going on in our lives here on Carlilse Road. If you don't know, you should be aware that we have medical issues and will be spending time going back and forth to medical appointments and hospital stays in the next few weeks or months. With this hecticness going on, and with all the many events going on here on the island, there have been times when the website has not had its normal weekly turnover. It has sometimes continued to include two weeks at a time.

We will do our best to try to keep up with the events occurring on the island, and we will do our best at keeping up with the planned weekly turnover or rollover. We hope you will understand if that weekly change does not occur. We always attempt to add the new news on the top of the page, so that you will not have to go searching for the newest news.

We have maintained the same format for quite a while, and we plan to continue this format. The main reason is that we don't want to have to develop a different format for all the different electronic gadgets out there. We will continue to try to put the majority of video links out on separate pages for those with a much slower Internet speed and for those that don't have an interest in the video. The majority of the video on this main Current News page is there because the editor deems it to be important.

We will continue to provide "Today's News as Close to Today as Possible" and will include just about anything that most clubs, associations, commissions, and other groups including church groups are willing to send to us. We have reached out to the Lighthouse Fellowship and the Episcopal Mission for information as well as the two that you will find here. We try to make this a simple, yet appealing source of island information.

If you have an event, we will do our best to make that event known, and possibly will record or live stream it for those unable to attend.

Phyllis' Daily Weather

May 22, 2017

Another blustery, chilly day on Beaver Island. Right now I'm showing partly cloudy skies, 45°, feels like 39°, wind is at 13 mph from the SW with gusts to 21 mph, humidity is at 93%, pressure is steady at 29.75 inches, and visibility is 9.6 miles. Today: Mostly cloudy. Numerous rain showers throughout the day. Highs in the upper 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph with gusts to 25 mph. Tonight: Mostly cloudy in the evening the becoming partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s. Southwest winds at 10 mph with gusts up to 25 mph in the evening.
MARINE REPORT: Small Craft Advisory In Effect Through This Evening.
Today: Southwest wind 10 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots. Scattered showers throughout the day. Waves 2 to 4 feet building to 3 to 5 feet in the morning.
Tonight: Southwest wind 5 to 10 knots. Mostly cloudy. Waves 2 to 3 feet.

On this date of May 22, 1819 - The steamship Savannah became the first to cross the Atlantic Ocean. (from en.wikipedia.org)

SS Savannah was an American hybrid sailing ship/sidewheel steamer built in 1818. She is notable for being the first steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean, a feat that was accomplished from May to June 1819, although only a fraction of the distance was covered with the ship under steam power. The rest was sailed by wind power. In spite of her historic voyage, Savannah was not a commercial success as a steamship and was converted back into a sailing ship shortly after returning from Europe.[2]

Savannah was wrecked off Long Island in 1821. No other American-owned steamship would cross the Atlantic for almost thirty years after Savannah's pioneering voyage.

Did you know that an ostrich's eye is bigger than its brain? So this made me curious to learn a bit more about the ostrich. As a result I made a stop at animals.howstuffworks.com and learned this:

"Of the three main varieties of ostriches, only the African black ostrich (Struthio camelus domesticus) is found in captivity. They are farmed for meat, leather, and feathers in at least 50 countries and just about all climatic conditions, from Alaska to equatorial Africa. Ostriches have the best feed-to-weight ratio gain of any farmed land animal in the world and produce the strongest commercially available leather.

The ostrich's eyes are about the size of billiard balls. They take up so much room in the skull that the ostrich's brain is actually smaller than either one of its eyeballs. This may be why the ostrich, despite its tremendous running speed, is not very good at eluding predators: It tends to run in circles.

The ostrich's intestines are 46 feet long--about twice as long as those of a human. This enables the bird to get the most out of the tough plants it eats. To help with digestion, it also swallows sand and small stones to break down food in its gizzard. Ostriches in captivity have been known to swallow just about anything that can fit down their gullet, including coins, bicycle valves, alarm clocks, and even small bottles.

The ostrich is the largest living bird in the world. An ostrich chick grows one foot taller each month until it is seven or eight months old. Adult ostrich roosters are six to ten feet in height and can weigh as much as 340 pounds. Because of their prodigious size, ostriches were occasionally used for riding or pulling chariots in ancient Egypt; the practice never really took off, because the ostrich has a nasty temper.

This great bird has only two toes; all other birds have three or four. Ostriches kick forward, not backward, because that's the direction in which their knees bend. Ostriches never need to drink water--some of it they make internally, and the rest is derived from the vegetation they eat.

Physiologus, an early Christian text compiled around the second century A.D. and a popular read in the Middle Ages, asserts that the ostrich incubates its eggs by staring at them. It was widely held at the time that vision was the effect of special "seeing" rays emanating from one's eyes; thus, the heat in the gaze of the ostrich hatched its chicks. The author of Physiologus presents this as an allegory to inspire worshippers to keep their eyes on Christ.

Word of the day: ultracrepidarian (uhl-truh-krep-i-DAIR-ee-uh n) which means noting or pertaining to a person who criticizes, judges, or gives advice outside the area of his or her expertise. Ultracrepidarian is nonexistent in Latin and very rare in English. The word was coined by the English essayist William Hazlitt (1778-1830) from the Latin phrase ultra crepidam “beyond the sandal” (there are several Latin versions) taken from the Natural History (book 35) of the Roman polymath Pliny the Elder (a.d. 23-79). Pliny was retelling a retort that Apelles (4th century b.c.), a famous ancient Greek painter, made to a cobbler. The cobbler the day before had criticized Apelles for inaccurately painting a sandal, and Apelles corrected his error. The next day the cobbler tried to criticize Apelles’ painting of the leg the sandal was on, at which the exasperated Apelles remarked that “a shoemaker should not judge above his sandal.” Ultracrepidarian entered English in the 19th century.

B. I. Christian Church Bulletin

May 21, 2017

BIESA Minutes and Agenda

Present, This Day

by Cindy Ricksgers

Mass from Holy Cross, 9:30 a.m. Sunday

Heidi Vigil, lector......Deacon Jim reads the Gospel

Father John Paul gave the sermon

Blessing of the gifts

With several of the returning summer residents, the mass was well attended. The service was a normal service for a Sunday Mass. All sang "Happy Birthday" to Deacon Jim Siler since he was gone on this day. Then Deacon Jim read a message that he received from his visit.

Deacon Jim's Message and End of Service

 

View the video of this service HERE

Phyllis' Daily Weather

May 21, 2017

Dreary, overcast skies this morning, 45°, feels like 38°, wind is at 14 mph from the east with gusts to 24 mph, humidity is at 82%, pressure is falling from 29.91 inches, and visibility is 9.9 miles. Today: Mostly cloudy with scattered rain showers. Patchy fog. Highs in the lower 60s. Southeast winds 5 to 10 mph. Gusts up to 35 mph decreasing to 25 mph in the afternoon. Tonight: Partly cloudy with isolated rain showers in the evening, then mostly cloudy with scattered rain showers after midnight. Lows in the mid 40s. Southwest winds at 10 mph with gusts to around 25 mph.
MARINE REPORT: Small Craft Advisory In Effect Through Late Tonight
Today: East wind 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 30 knots becoming southeast 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 20 knots in the afternoon, then becoming southwest with gusts to around 20 knots early in the evening. Isolated showers early in the morning, then scattered showers in the morning. Patchy fog in the morning. Waves 2 to 4 feet subsiding to 2 to 3 feet in the afternoon.
Tonight: Southwest wind 15 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots. Chance of showers. Waves 2 to 3 feet.

On this date of May 21, 1819 - Bicycles were first seen in the U.S. in New York City. (From famousdaily.com:)

"If you were to browse a collection of antique machines from the early 18th century, do not be surprised to find one that looks like a wooden bicycle without pedals. It was not intended as a decoration or a toy — German inventor Karl Von Drais created the Laufmaschine as a mobility aid during a period when there was a shortage of horses. A century later the invention was somewhat improved upon and popularized by a Londoner named Denis Johnson. Largely due to his marketing bicycles came to be in widespread use.

On this day May 21, in 1819 the first bicycle in the U.S. was seen in New York City. Alternately called “velocipedes,” “swift walkers,” “hobby horses” or “dandy horses” for the dandies that most often rode them, they had been imported from London that same year.

Pedal and chain bicycles of today came from the invention of Pierre Lallement of Nancy, France, who saw one of the dandy horses in a park and was inspired to add a transmission to it. After a brief stint manufacturing them in France, Lallement decided to move to the U.S. There, with James Carroll of New Haven, Connecticut as his financier, he filed the earliest U.S. patent for a pedal bicycle."

Did you know that the world's most expensive spice is saffron? (From farsinet.com:)

"Saffron, botanical name crocus sativus, is the most expensive spice in the world. Derived from the dried stigmas of the purple saffron crocus, it takes anything from 70,000 to 250,000 flowers to make one pound of saffron. Moreover, the flowers have to be individually hand-picked in the autumn when fully open. Fortunately, only a little needs to be added to a dish to lend it colour and aroma; too much makes the food bitter and as the quotation from Culpeper (below) suggests, large quantities of it can be toxic.

'The use of it ought to be moderate and reasonable, for when the dose is too large, it produces a heaviness of the head and sleepiness. Some have fallen into an immoderate convulsive laughter which ended in death.'
Culpeper's The Complete Herbal, 1649

Records detailing the use of saffron go back to ancient Egypt and Rome where it was used as a dye, in perfumes, and as a drug, as well as for culinary purposes. It reached China in the 7th century and spread through Europe in the Middle Ages. The town of Saffron Walden, where it was once grown commercially, takes its name from the plant. Now, however, most saffron is imported from Iran (southern Khorason) and Spain which are recognised as producing the best quality, but it can also be found in Egypt, Kashmir, Morocco and Turkey.

Saffron has an aroma and flavor which cannot be duplicated, and a chemical make-up which, when understood, helps the chef or home cook to know how to best release that flavor and aroma in cooking and baking. Saffron is sold in two forms, powder and threads, and each behave very differently in the kitchen.

In order to understand commercial saffron, it is important to understand the make-up of the saffron plant. More importantly, it is the easiest way for you, as a consumer, to be sure you are buying good saffron. Commercial saffron comes from the bright red stigmas of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus) which flowers in the Fall in many different countries, including Greece, India, Iran and Spain. The Crocus sativus stigmas are the female part of the flower. In a good year, each saffron crocus plant might produce several flowers. Each flower contains three stigmas, which are the only part of the saffron crocus that when dried (cured) properly, become commercial saffron. Each red stigma is like a little capsule that encloses the complex chemicals that make up saffron's aroma, flavor, and yellow dye. In order to release these chemicals, you must steep the threads. Powdered saffron is more efficient because it does not need to be steeped.

Word of the day: slumberous (SLUHM-ber-uh s) which means 1.) sleepy; heavy with drowsiness, as the eyelids.
2.) causing or inducing sleep. 3.) pertaining to, characterized by, or suggestive of slumber. Slumbrous is the older spelling for today’s slumberous. Samuel Johnson (1709–84) entered the spelling slumberous in his Dictionary of the English Language (1755), and his spelling became the more common one during the 19th century. Slumbrous entered English in the 15th century.

     

Links

Cinematic Tour of Beaver Island

The Chamber of Commerce of Beaver Island has posted this, and BINN found it on facebook. It's a very nice video, viewable on YouTube.

View it here

Holocaust Survivor Martin Lowenberg

Video by Kaylyn Jones HERE

Airport Commission Meeting

April 1, 2017

View video of the meeting HERE

Emergency Services Authority

 

BICS Board Meetings

November 14, 2016

School Board Meeting Packet HERE

View video of the meeting HERE

 

Anti-Bullying Presentation to BICS Parents

View presentation HERE

Peaine Township Meeting

Peaine Annual Meetings

View video of the meeting HERE

April 12, 2017

HERE

May 1, 2017

View video of the meeting HERE

View video of May 10th Peaine Meeting HERE

St. James Township Meeting Video

April 5, 2017

View video of the meeting HERE

April 24, 2017, 7 p.m.

View a small gallery of pictures of the meeting HERE

View video of the meeting HERE

May 3, 2017

View video of the meeting HERE

Beaver Island Community Center

BEAVER ISLAND COMMUNITY CENTER

At the Heart of a Good Community

FALL HOURS
Effective Tuesday, 9/8/15
CLOSED Labor Day, 9/7 Happy Holiday!!
M-F 9am-5pm
Sat 9am-9pm
Sun – CLOSED
231 448-2022
beaverislandcommunitycenter.org

Check www.BeaverIslandCommunityCenter.org or the Community Center for listings

Link to the Beaver Island Airport 10-year Plan

On the Beach of Beaver Island

You will need Quicktime or another music player to enjoy this link.

The music played in the Holy Cross Hall in the late 70's and early 80's, recorded for posterity and shared here.

When Santa Missed the Boat to Beaver Island

as read by Phil Gregg

Click HERE

Meeting Minutes

The minutes of all public meetings will be posted

as soon as they are received.

News on the 'Net welcomes minutes to all public meetings. All organizations are welcome to submit meeting minutes for publication on this website. Please email them to medic5740@gmail.com.

Airport Committee Minutes

Beaver Island Cultural Arts Association Minutes

Beaver Island District Library Board Minutes

Peaine Township Board Minutes

BIRHC Board Meeting Minutes

St. James Township Meeting Minutes

Beaver Island Community School Board Meeting Minutes

Beaver Island Ecotourism Goals Draft, rev. 3, 19 Jan 2010

Beaver Island Natural Resources and Eco-Tourism Steering Committee Minutes

Beaver Island Transportation Authority Minutes

Joint Human Resources Commission Minutes

Waste Management Committee Minutes

Beaver Island Airport Commission Minutes New for 2011!

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Community Appreciation Pig Roast

May 20, 2017

It was a little chilly and windy down on the Beaver Island Boat Company Dock here on Beaver Island for the Community Appreciation Dinner held tonight from four until eight. The event was an obvious success judging by the number of cars that lined both sides of the street from the hardware store all the way down to the post office.

The entertainment

View a gallery of photos HERE

The main course

 

View video of the dinner HERE

9th Annual Glenn McDonough Memorial Concert

and

Eve Glen McDonough Music School

Vacation Bible School

June 27-29, 2017

Beaver Island Birding Presentations

See changes above

The Beaver Island Birding Trail festivities are approaching quickly and we hope you can carve out some time over Memorial Weekend to join us either on a field trip or at a presentation.  Participants will be easily spotted in a newly designed BIBT t-shirt in a yellow warbler color which was illustrated by Trevor Grabill.

Thank you to the BIBT sponsors: Beaver Island Gulf Coarse, Beaver Island Association, Beaver Island Boat Company, Beaver Beacon, Beaver Island Wildlife Club, Beaver Island Studio and Gallery, BirdGoober, Little Traverse Conservancy, Island Airways, Dalwhinnie, McDonough's Market, Preservation Association of Beaver Island, Paradise Bay Coffee Shop, and Holy Cross Church.

All presentations take place at the Community Center. No registration is required for presentations, free, and appropriate for all age groups.

The festivities begin on Friday night, May 26th at 5 p.m.: “Michigan Eagles and Ospreys, A Bird's Eye View” presented by Jerry Weinrich at 5 p.m.

Jerry Weinrich will speak on his dream job conducting a census of the eagle and osprey populations in the Northern Lower Peninsula. As a wildlife biologist for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment for 30 years, Jerry has the distinction of coordinating the longest-running, large scale census of eagles and ospreys anywhere in the country. He has produced amazing aerial views, not only of nests with fledglings inside, but birds in flight as well. The eagle population, Weinrich says, is on the rise — up from 30 nesting pair in the Lower Peninsula when he started to 407 now. There are about 120 pair of nesting osprey, he said. Currently, Beaver Island is the only Great Lakes Island with a pair of nesting Osprey.
Weinrich hopes those who attend will walk away from the program with an appreciation of how well the eagles are doing.

Saturday, May 27th from 4:30 - 5:30 p.m., the BIBT festivities will include Birding 101 presented by Darrell Lawson.

Interested in exploring skills helpful to beginning birders? Join Darrell Lawson, President of the Petoskey Audubon Club, for a beginning birding presentation at the Community Center. Darrell will cover field guide selection, optics selection, tips for learning bird songs, bird habitats, and identification pitfalls to avoid. Darrell is an avid birder who loves sharing his passion.

Sunday, May 28th at 1 p.m.-Penguins and Prions: Birds and Wildlife of the Seventh Continent presented by Cathy Theisen. The continent of Antarctica is a fascinating, uninhabited land of ice and snow. Not a single land mammal lives here, although it boasts a rich collection of both bird and marine mammal life. Join Dr. Cathy Theisen on the trip of a lifetime to the bottom of the globe, and learn about the fascinating animals and the adaptations that allow them to live here. Examine some of the effects of human disruption, and some of the greatest restoration successes of this fragile wilderness.

At 4:30 p.m.-Birding Peru; Penguins to Piping Guans with Brian Allen. In the Spring of 2010, Brian was invited to Peru on a trip sponsored by Kolibri Expeditions to explore the feasibility of doing ecotourism in the Satipo Valley in the east central region of the Andes Mountains. Brian says that this program will show some of the stunning scenery and some of the scariest roads for birding he has ever experienced! He will take us to some of the last retreats of the Black-spectacled Brush Finch, the endemic Pardusco, and the gorgeous Golden-backed and Yellow-scarfed Tanagers.

More information on the speakers and events can be found on http://www.beaverislandbirdingtrail.org

Bumble Bee Watch Assistance

(Sent to BINN by Bob Tidmore)


The US Fish and Wildlife Service contacted Beaver Island with a request to be on the look out for a rusty-patched bumble bee which is listed as an endangered species.  It was last seen in Michigan in 2006. Where the species remains elsewhere is often in natural areas within an urban/suburban settings--essentially natural habitat islands, isolated from other natural areas. Disease is one suspect for the decline of the species, so perhaps isolation whether man-made or natural might be important.  Great Lakes islands may be the last refuge to find a rusty-patched bumble bee thus the agency is asking for your observations.  Below is a bumble bee watch program for those who are interested to help find rare bumble bees in Michigan. 

Website –http://www.bumblebeewatch.org

The Beaver Island Archipelago is known by state and federal agencies for its high quality natural areas hosting threatened and endangered species. These islands support an unusual number of plants and animals under state and/or federal protection for their size.   Piping Plover, Hines emerald dragonfly, Michigan monkey-flower, Dwarf Lake iris, Pitcher's thistle, Houghton's goldenrod, Lake Huron tansy, various orchids and grasses are enjoyed by many residents, biologists, and visitors.   

There is one record already on the bumble bee watch site for Beaver Island for a Tri-colored bumble bee. It would be great to have more eyes looking for bumble bees and sending photos into the web site.  Perhaps, your observation will add another unique species to the island's list?

What Did You Say 15

By Joe Moore


(It is important to note that some of the circumstances of these emergency stories are completely fictional.  It is important to make certain that patient privacy is protected, so that no one will know which are fictional and which are based upon actual happenings here on the island.  While most are a combination of fiction and factual circumstances, patient privacy has been purposefully protected in all the stories.  Without participating in these exact emergencies, you will never know fact from fiction.)


As I sit here in my chair on a early evening in the winter, I start thinking about the snow that we got last night, about five inches, and the snow that is forecast for tonight after bedtime.  In the next twenty-four hours, we could get six more inches of snow.  We don’t usually get lake effect snow, so this snow from yesterday and for tonight would be from ‘clippers,’ snowstorms that sweep across the countryside and dump the moisture as snow when the temperatures are below freezing, and as rain when the temperatures go above freezing.  Rain on top of snow and then freezing temperatures spell dangerous conditions for all the population, buildings that don’t have excellent ability to support the weight of the wet snow, and older people in particular.

Resd the rest of the story HERE

Special St. James Meeting Scheduled

May 22, 2017

BICS Elementary Kids at Hayo-Went-Ha

by Deb Robert

This morning we shall say goodbye...to our counselors and to this camp. And this afternoon I shall return to Beaver Island with different children. Yes, they may look the same on the outside, but on the inside, they have changed for sure. They are stronger, braver, more confident. They believe in themselves more, are aware of unique talents and abilities that they didn't know existed inside themselves. They have learned to work together, to rely on one another, to face their fears. They have pushed themselves to the brink of tears as they dangled from ropes 35 feet in the air, paused, and pushed through their fears to overcome and continue on.

On Monday we shall return , to math and reading and writing and social studies. We shall continue on with our busy school year and finish all of our spring testing. The kids will show academic growth for sure for they are bright and hard working and I have spent the past 180 days promoting and encouraging these academic skills and talents.

But what they have learned in these past few days is immeasurable. At least not by any standardized measurement system. This trip, from the beginning to the end has challenged them to stand at the edge of their comfort zones, to step into the unknown, to look fear in the eye and meet it with strength and determination. And I have been so blessed to have witnessed it!

Barney's Visiting Heron

Not certain whether this heron was a normal spring resident of Barney's Lake or somewhere else, but today, while sitting on the bench near the boat launch, just relaxing, the camera managed to jump up and take these pictures as the heron decided to visit the shallows on the road side of the lake.

Heron in flight low over the water.

Coming in for a successful landing near the shoreline

Now, what's for lunch? Will it be a minnow or a small snake?

 

Announcements/Ads

Harold E. Kruse Celebration of Life Service

A Celebration of Life Service will be held for Harold E. Kruse on May 27, 2017, at 2 p.m. at the Congregational Church in Central Lake, Michigan. In lieu of flowers, we ask that you live your life a Harold lived his. Let the love Jesus Christ shine through you every day.

Roy Elsworth Memorial

Roy Elsworth Memorial will be on Saturday, May 27, 2017, from noon to 4:00pm at the Circle M. All are welcome to join us in a luncheon and celebrating his amazing life, share stories & memories.
From the bottom of our hearts, we would like to thank each and every one of you all, for your condolences, prayers, love and especially for the outpouring of support & help.
Shari Wojciehowski, Duane & Roger Elsworth

BICS Committee Meeting Schedule

BIESA Meeting Schedule

Fiscal Year 2017-18 Meeting Schedule

 

Holy Cross Bulletin for

May 2017

Christian Church Bulletin

May 21, 2017

BICS School Calendar 2016-17

BICS Events Calendar 2017

BIHS Schedule for 2016

HSC Meeting Dates Schedule


BI Airport Commission Meeting Schedule

Bank Hours Change


January thru April
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
9am-1pm

May thru June
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9am-1pm

July thru August
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9am-3pm

September thru October
Monday Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9am-1pm

November thru December
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
9am-1pm

Island Treasures Resale Shop

We will be open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from noon until 4:00. During those hours we will gladly accept your "gently used, barely used, like new " items. Please be sure that your donations be in season, clean, and in good repair. Thank you for your support !

Open for shopping and donations

If you need help with your donation, call the shop at 448-2534

or Donna at 448-2797.

Donate to the Food Pantry

Use this button below to donate to the Food Pantry.

Donation goes to the Christian Church Food Pantry--Click the Donate Button on the far left and above.


Donate to the Live Streaming Project

 

The Live Streaming Project includes BICS Sports Events, Peaine Township Meetings, Joint Township Meetings, and much more.

Your donation may allow these events to be live streamed on the Internet at http://beaverisland.tv

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