B. I. News on the 'Net, November 25-December 9, 2019

Phyllis' Daily Weather

December 5, 2019

It's 29°, feels like 19°, mostly cloudy skies, humidity is 75%, dew point is 22°, wind is from the WNW at 10 mph, pressure is rising from 29.92 inches, cloud cover is 90%, and visibility is 10 miles. Marine forecast is as follows:
...SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 AM EST THIS MORNING...\

Today Northwest wind 10 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots becoming west 5 to 10 knots in the late morning. Chance of rain and snow in the afternoon. Waves 2 to 4 feet subsiding to 2 feet or less in the afternoon.

Tonight Northwest wind 15 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots. Rain with snow likely. Waves 2 to 4 feet.

Friday Northwest wind 15 to 20 knots with gusts to around 30 knots. Mostly cloudy. Waves 3 to 5 feet.

Friday Night West wind 5 to 10 knots. Cloudy. Waves 2 to 3 feet.

ON THIS DAY At 2:10 p.m., five U.S. Navy Avenger torpedo-bombers comprising Flight 19 take off from the Ft. Lauderdale Naval Air Station in Florida on a routine three-hour training mission. Flight 19 was scheduled to take them due east for 120 miles, north for 73 miles, and then back over a final 120-mile leg that would return them to the naval base. They never returned.

Two hours after the flight began, the leader of the squadron, who had been flying in the area for more than six months, reported that his compass and back-up compass had failed and that his position was unknown. The other planes experienced similar instrument malfunctions. Radio facilities on land were contacted to find the location of the lost squadron, but none were successful. After two more hours of confused messages from the fliers, a distorted radio transmission from the squadron leader was heard at 6:20 p.m., apparently calling for his men to prepare to ditch their aircraft simultaneously because of lack of fuel.

By this time, several land radar stations finally determined that Flight 19 was somewhere north of the Bahamas and east of the Florida coast, and at 7:27 p.m. a search and rescue Mariner aircraft took off with a 13-man crew. Three minutes later, the Mariner aircraft radioed to its home base that its mission was underway. The Mariner was never heard from again. Later, there was a report from a tanker cruising off the coast of Florida of a visible explosion seen at 7:50 p.m.

The disappearance of the 14 men of Flight 19 and the 13 men of the Mariner led to one of the largest air and seas searches to that date, and hundreds of ships and aircraft combed thousands of square miles of the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and remote locations within the interior of Florida. No trace of the bodies or aircraft was ever found.

Although naval officials maintained that the remains of the six aircraft and 27 men were not found because stormy weather destroyed the evidence, the story of the “Lost Squadron” helped cement the legend of the Bermuda Triangle, an area of the Atlantic Ocean where ships and aircraft are said to disappear without a trace. The Bermuda Triangle is said to stretch from the southern U.S. coast across to Bermuda and down to the Atlantic coast of Cuba and Santo Domingo.(history.com)

DID YOU KNOW In the 2011 census for the Czech Republic, over 15 thousand people listed their religion as Jedi. (allthatsinteresting.com)

WORD OF THE DAY acquiesce (ak-wee-ESS) which means to accept, comply, or submit tacitly or passively - often used with in or to. Acquiesce means essentially "to comply quietly," so it should not surprise you to learn that it is ultimately derived from the Latin verb quiēscere, meaning "to be quiet." It arrived in English in the early 1600s, via the French acquiescer, with the senses "to agree or comply" and "to rest satisfied" (this latter sense is now obsolete). An early example of the word acquiesce in the sense of "to agree or comply" can be found in the writings of the English philosopher Thomas Hobbes who, in his 1651 masterpiece, Leviathan, argued that people must subject themselves completely to a sovereign and should obey the teachings of the church. Encouraging his readers to adopt his position he wrote, "Our Beleefe … is in the Church; whose word we take, and acquiesce therein." (Merriam-webster.com)

Snowy Owl

December 4, 2019

After searching day after day, hour after hour, to find the snowy owl that has been captured by two excellent photographers, Cynthia Johnson and Becca Foli, this editor had not seen the snowy owl. It was frustrating to search and not find the owl. The telephone rang today with Cynthia Johnson telling me that the snowy owl was on the roof of the St. James Township Hall at Whiskey Point.

There is this beautiful snowy owl.

View a gallery of photos HERE

View some video HERE

The trip to the Point was successful with pictures and video. The telephone rang again a little after 4:30 p.m., and Mary Kenwabikise announce that there was a snowy owl across the street from the post office.

Sure enough, on the roof of the Bonadeo building by the yacht dock, there was a snowy owl. Twice in one day. Did the owl move, or is this a different owl?

It was getting dark, so the pictures were not spectacular. A trip to the Point found the snowy owl still there and this one in the picture was still there on the return. Yes, there are at least two younger female snowy owls in the harbor area.

Special Airport Committee Meeting

December 6, 2019, 11:30 a.m. at Peaine Township Hall

View meeting notice HERE

Special Joint Township Meeting

December 6, 2019, at noon, Peaine Hall

View meeting notice HERE

Shop Local

Great Lakes Islands Association

Documents for call in

2019 Islands Summit summary_DRAFT 12032019

2019-GLIA SUMMIT Press Release

GLIA SC_minutes_November 20 2019

WashingtonIslandObserver_20191107

Phyllis' Daily Weather

December 4, 2019

Reposting this reminder from November 25th:
We did this several years ago and decided to repeat it as she was so thrilled. My mom, Lil Gregg, will be 95 on December 13th, making her the oldest year 'round island resident. If you’d like to send her a birthday card, her address is: Lillian Gregg; PO Box 99; Beaver Island MI 49782. Thanks so much in advance.

PS We are taking her to the Shamrock for dinner the night before her birthday, the 12th (anyone want to join us - Dutch treat. ) Out for lunch on her actual birthday at Dalwinnie’s. She gets too stressed if we did a party at her house.
-----------------------------------------------------------

We have cloudy skies this morning, 33°, feels like 23°, wind is from the WNW at 12 mph with gusts to 17 mph, humidity is 89%, dew point is 31°, pressure is 29.41 inches, cloud cover is 100%, and visibility is 7 miles. Marine forecast is as follows:
...SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT...

Today Northwest wind 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 30 knots. Scattered rain and snow showers. Waves 2 to 4 feet building to 3 to 5 feet in the afternoon.

Tonight Northwest wind 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 30 knots. Scattered rain and snow showers. Waves 4 to 6 feet.

Thursday Northwest wind 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 20 knots. Chance of rain and snow showers. Waves 2 to 4 feet.

Thursday Night Northwest wind 15 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots. Rain showers and snow showers likely. Waves 4 to 6 feet.

ON THIS DAY December 4, 1991, Islamic militants in Lebanon release kidnapped American journalist Terry Anderson after 2,454 days in captivity.

As chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press, Anderson covered the long-running civil war in Lebanon (1975-1990). On March 16, 1985, he was kidnapped on a west Beirut street while leaving a tennis court. His captors took him to the southern suburbs of the city, where he was held prisoner in an underground dungeon for the next six-and-a-half years.

Anderson was one of 92 foreigners (including 17 Americans) abducted during Lebanon’s bitter civil war. The kidnappings were linked to Hezbollah, or the Party of God, a militant Shiite Muslim organization formed in 1982 in reaction to Israel’s military presence in Lebanon. They seized several Americans, including Anderson, soon after Kuwaiti courts jailed 17 Shiites found guilty of bombing the American and French embassies there in 1983. Hezbollah in Lebanon received financial and spiritual support from Iran, where prominent leaders praised the bombers and kidnappers for performing their duty to Islam.

U.S. relations with Iran–and with Syria, the other major foreign influence in Lebanon–showed signs of improving by 1990, when the civil war drew to a close, aided by Syria’s intervention on behalf of the Lebanese army. Eager to win favor from the U.S. in order to promote its own economic goals, Iran used its influence in Lebanon to engineer the release of nearly all the hostages over the course of 1991.

Anderson returned to the U.S. and was reunited with his family, including his daughter Suleme, born three months after his capture. In 1999, he sued the Iranian government for $100 million, accusing it of sponsoring his kidnappers; he received a multi-million dollar settlement. (history.com)

DID YOU KNOW Alexander the Great encouraged his men to shave so enemies couldn't grab their beards during battles. (allthatsinteresting.com)

WORD OF THE DAY coup de grâce (koo-duh-GRAHSS) which means:
1 : a deathblow or death shot administered to end the suffering of one mortally wounded
2 : a decisive finishing blow, act, or event
Borrowed directly from French and first appearing in English at the end of the 17th century, coup de grâce (also sometimes styled without the circumflex as coup de grace) translates literally as "stroke of grace" or "blow of mercy," and originally referred to a mercy killing, or to the act of putting to death a person or animal who was severely injured and unlikely to recover. (In some contexts the term is used to refer to the final act of executing a convicted criminal.) Later, coup de grâce had come to mean "an act or event that puts a definite end to something." Other coup terms that have made the jump from French to English include coup de main, for a sudden, forceful attack, and coup d’état for a violent overthrow of a government usually by a small group. (Merriam-webster.com)

St. James Meeting

December 4, 2019, at 5:30 p.m. at St. James Hall

View video of the meeting HERE

DRAFT Minutes of November 6, 2019 Regular St. James Board Meeting

2019 Sewer Rate Study Update

BIAC Min Stds Draft 22019

Bills for Payment

BIWMC Structure, Repsonibility & Authority FINAL

Brewery Memo 11-14-19

Gen Fund Budget 1119

Gen Fund Budget 1219

Marina Budget Report 1119

Marina Budget Report 1219

monthlyfinancereport12_december.2019

Payroll 110519-120319

Road Fund Budget 1119

Road Fund Budget 1219

Sewer Budget Report 1119

Sewer Budget Report 1219

SJTBagn120419

sjtpwcminnov202019

supervisorlens12_december22019

Transfer Station_Recycling Attendant (Part-time) Final

Special Joint Townships' Meeting

December 6, 2019, at noon, at Peaine Township Hall

View meeting notice HERE

Beautiful Ice and Snow

December 2, 2019

Thanks to Jeff Mestelle and the electric snow blower, the following pictures were made possible. There were drifts of fifteen inches in the driveway with six to eight inches on the ramp. After a difficult, but effect snow blowing, the cars could get out of the driveway. After following a tip, but not having success, a stop at Whiskey Point woke up the photographer to the beauty of the sun, the ice, and the snow.

The holiday ice trees off Whiskey Point

A close-up of another ice tree

The snow left its mark and its beauty on the trees

Then the sun wanted in on the beauty as well.

The search for the snowy owl was not successful, but the beauty was all around.

Wendy Anne Still Working

December 2, 2019

The Wendy Anne went out of the harbor on Monday with the loaded barge. The few pictures show the beautiful sunny day as it was leaving.

Picture taken from the Beaver Island Marine dock.

Headed out of the harbor

Phyllis' Daily Weather

December 3, 2019

It's warmed up a bit. When we went to bed last night it was 15°, Right now it's 35°, feels like 24°, humidity is 79%, dew point is 29°, wind is from the SW at 13 mph with gusts up to 18 mph, pressure is falling from 29.71 inches, cloud cover is 100%, and visibility is 10 miles. Marine forecast as follows:
...SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE WEDNESDAY NIGHT...

Today Southwest wind 10 to 20 knots. Gusts up to 25 knots. Slight chance of rain in the afternoon. Waves 2 feet or less building to 3 to 5 feet.

Tonight West wind 10 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots. Scattered rain and snow showers. Waves 3 to 5 feet.

Wednesday Northwest wind 10 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots. Chance of rain and snow showers. Waves 4 to 6 feet.

Wednesday Night Northwest wind 15 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots. Chance of rain and snow showers. Waves 4 to 6 feet.

ON THIS DAY In a letter dated December 3, 1776, General George Washington writes to Congress from his headquarters in Trenton, New Jersey, to report that he had transported much of the Continental Army’s stores and baggage across the Delaware River to Pennsylvania.

In his letter Washington wrote, Immediately on my arrival here, I ordered the removal of all the military and other stores and baggage over the Delaware, a great quantity are already got over, and as soon as the boats come up from Philadelphia, we shall load them, by which means I hope to have every thing secured this night and tomorrow if we are not disturbed.

Washington then made the critical strategic move of confiscating and burning all the boats along the Delaware to prevent British troops from pursuing his beleaguered forces across the river. The British strategy of chasing Washington across New Jersey, rather than capturing his entire army in Manhattan, seemed to be a stroke of genius. As New Jersey was devastated at the hands of British forces and Washington’s men cowered in Pennsylvania, even staunch Patriots, including Thomas Jefferson, considered surrender to the crown.

Also on this day, General Washington received a letter dated November 30 from his second-in-command, General Charles Lee, reporting that he was about to cross into New York near Peekskill on this day in 1776. In an apt reflection of the state of the American fortunes, the British captured General Lee nine days later in New Jersey. Richard Stockton, a leading New Jersey patriot and signer of the Declaration of Independence, was also in British custody and was forced to swear an oath of allegiance to the British king along with thousands of his New Jersey neighbors. (history.com)

DID YOU KNOW The designer of the current United States flag was 17 at the time, and created it for a high school project. He received a B-. (allthatsinteresting.com)

WORD OF THE DAY ersatz (AIR-sahts) which means being a usually artificial and inferior substitute or immitation. Ersatz can be traced back in English to the 1870s, but it really came into prominence during World War I. Borrowed from German, where Ersatz is a noun meaning "substitute," the word was frequently applied as an adjective in English to modify terms like coffee (made from acorns) and flour (made from potatoes)—ersatz products resulting from the privations of war. By the time World War II came around, bringing with it a resurgence of the word along with more substitute products, ersatz was wholly entrenched in the language. Today, ersatz can be applied to almost anything that seems like an artificial imitation. (Merriam-webster.com)

PUBLIC NOTICE ST JAMES TOWNSHIP DECEMBER BOARD OF REVIEW
DECEMBER 10, 2019

View notice HERE

COA Monthly Update

Good Morning,

Just a note to keep you up to date on what is going on with the COA and to respond to requests for more information.  Please find attached the December 2019 Senior Hi-Lites NewsletterShould you have ANY questions about program requirements or qualifications, please contact Kathie our Site Coordinator on Beaver Island or Sheri Shepard in the COA Office. 

The Beaver Island In-Home Reimbursement Program

SERVICES COVERED:

Personal Care can include: Bed bath, sponge bath, or shower, Foot Care (no cutting nails), Hair Care (wash, dry, roller set style-NO cutting hair), Skin (wash, apply lotion), Oral Care (brush teeth, soak, and wash dentures) Perineal Care(assist), Dressing (assist with dressing and laying out clothes for night and morning), Colostomy Care (empty bag, replace), Catheter Care(wash), Toileting, Assist with TED hose. Homemaking duties may include: Bed linens changed, make the bed, dust wash dishes, take out the trash, clean kitchen, clean stove, clean refrigerator, vacuum, sweep, mop, clean bathroom, grocery shop, errands, bring in mail and laundry. Respite Care can include: Bed bath, sponge bath or shower, Foot Care (no cutting nails), Hair Care (wash, dry roller set, style-NO cutting hair), Skin (wash, apply lotion), Perineal Care(assist), Dressing (assist with dressing and lay out clothes for night and morning), Toileting, Light housekeeping, Assist with eating and light meal prep.”

We have had no one express interest in the Wellness Check program partnered with the Sheriff’s Department this month.

Reminder if you didn’t realize that you have had a choice all this time??   Beaver Island Seniors are welcome to be a part of the Charlevoix County Mainland Senior Centers and the services, activities, lunches/dinners and events provided at the centers through the COA.  When you schedule your appointments, shopping and family events on the mainland, look to coordinate your visit with the opportunities the COA is providing, and make an appointment to participate if it is required.  Otherwise, just show up.  Services, Activities, lunches/dinners and events are listed for all Senior Center locations in the attached Newsletter.  Appointments are required for Foot Clinics and some events so please call the center you would like to visit directly to see what is needed.  Contact names, phone numbers and addresses are also available on our Newsletter.

The next COA Advisory Board Meetings are:

December 16, 2019 at the COA Building in Charlevoix at 10am

The COA Advisory Board meets all around Charlevoix County including Beaver Island so that they are accessible to all the aging population of Charlevoix County at a coordinated time and place each month. 

As a reminder, the Mainland Senior Centers Hours are:

9a-2p Monday through Friday October through April

9a-2p Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday May through September.  Wednesday’s hours are 2p-7p for Wednesday Night Dinners May through September (there is not lunch or Home Delivered Meals that day).

They are closed for most of the National Holidays.

Beaver Island COA Office Updates:

The BI COA Office is located at 26466 Donegal Bay Rd and the hours are 8a-5p Monday through Friday.  Please do not contact Kathie outside of this time frame for services.  The phone number is 231-448-2124.  “Sunday Dinners” are still planned for once a month August through May and is a lunch but the locations for these “dinners” may change dependent upon availability and costs.  The office is still closed for most of the National Holidays.    

Meal Voucher Program update:

Nutritional Program Renewal Agreements were signed and returned to the COA by the following establishments to date, so these are the only places on Beaver Island accepting Vouchers at this time.:

Other Updates:

Those seniors who are age 60 or older will be required to complete an eligibility packet including the Snow Removal Self Declaration Form for the 2019/2020 season, provide proof of all income along with a copy of their proof of residency.  A completed packet will be the sole way of determining eligibility at this time.  Once the senior has completed the packet and returned it to the COA Office and eligibility has been determined, the senior will receive a letter informing them that they are enrolled in the program along with the designated vouchers.  If the eligible senior leaves their residence for a month or longer, they will not be eligible for the program until they return to the residence.  This program is for homeowners and independent residential rentals as a supplemental support to the costs of snow removal and does NOT apply to commercial buildings, assisted living facilities or apartment complexes to offset their costs of snow removal.

Other Updates Continued:

This application will be available at BICS and the BI COA office.  Seniors will be able to fill out the back to offer a volunteer opportunity to a student or students.  This could be raking leaves, lawn care, painting, shoveling snow, cleaning a garage, moving, building or fixing something, etc.   After approval, students will be able to get assigned and complete the project in exchange for volunteer hours required for graduation.

Amy Wieland

Executive Director

Charlevoix County Commission on Aging

Work Phone: 231-237-0103

Email: wielanda@charlevoixcounty.org

Address: 218 W. Garfield Avenue, Charlevoix, MI  49720

View Senior Highlights HERE

First of December

by Cindy Ricksgers

Phyllis' Daily Weather

December 2, 2019

The storm did not pass us by. It dumped a goodly amount of the white stuff, which I can't measure as I can't get the doors open. Joe will have to do that when he gets up. Anyhow, it's 22°, feels like 20°, mostly cloudy skies, humidity is at 69%, dew point is 13°, wind is from the NE at 5 mph, pressure is rising from 29.95 inches, cloud cover is 76%, and visibility is 10 miles. Today should be partly sunny with a high of 32°. Winds will be from the NNE at 10 to 15 mph. Marine forecast is as follows:
...SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL 1 PM EST THIS AFTERNOON...

Today North wind 10 to 15 knots. Gusts up to 20 knots early in the morning. Mostly clear. Waves 2 to 4 feet subsiding to 2 to 3 feet in the afternoon.

Tonight Southwest wind 15 to 20 knots. Partly cloudy. Waves 2 to 3 feet.

Tuesday Southwest wind 10 to 20 knots with gusts to around 30 knots. Cloudy. Waves 3 to 5 feet.

Tuesday Night Northwest wind 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 20 knots. Mostly cloudy. Waves 2 to 4 feet.

ON THIS DAY Legend has it that on the night of December 2, 1777, Philadelphia housewife and nurse Lydia Darragh single-handedly saves the lives of General George Washington and his Continental Army when she overhears the British planning a surprise attack on Washington’s army for the following day.

During the occupation of Philadelphia, British General William Howe stationed his headquarters across the street from the Darragh home, and when Howe’s headquarters proved too small to hold meetings, he commandeered a large upstairs room in the Darraghs’ house. Although uncorroborated, family legend holds that Mrs. Darragh would eavesdrop and take notes on the British meetings from an adjoining room and would conceal the notes by sewing them into her coat before passing them onto American troops stationed outside the city.

On the evening of December 2, 1777, Darragh overheard the British commanders planning a surprise attack on Washington’s army at Whitemarsh, Pennsylvania, for December 4 and 5. Using a cover story that she needed to buy flour from a nearby mill just outside the British line, Darragh passed the information to American Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Craig the following day.

The British marched towards Whitemarsh on the evening of December 4, 1777, and were surprised to find General Washington and the Continental Army waiting for them. After three inconclusive days of skirmishing, General Howe chose to return his troops to Philadelphia.

It is said that members of the Central Intelligence Agency still tell the story of Lydia Darragh, one of the first spies in American history. (history.com)

DID YOU KNOW When two white-faced capuchin monkeys meet, they say hello by sticking their fingers into each other's noses. (allthatsinteresting.com)

WORD OF THE DAY bon vivant (bahn-vee-VAHNT) which means a sociable person who has cultivated and refined tastes especially with respect to food and drink. Fans of fine French wine and cuisine won't be surprised to hear that the French language gave us a number of words for those who enjoy good living and good eating. Gourmet, gourmand, and gastronome come from French, as does bon vivant. In the late 17th century, English-speakers borrowed this French phrase, which literally means "good liver." No, we don't mean liver, as in the organ. We mean liver, as in "one who lives (in a specified way)"—in this case, "one who lives well." (Merriam-Webster.com)

A Place of the Heart

by Robert Cole

Video Report for November

December 1, 2019

There are now two video servers being used, one for the rebroadcast and the other for the live streaming. The video continues to show the many facets of Beaver Island, including the public meetings, the sports events, and church services, as well as things like the Thanksgiving Plunge.

In November, the rebroadcast video had 230 unique IP addresses view the video, with 497 views, and 16.1 GB of bandwidth used. This included rebroadcast video of 107 unique IPs, 317 views, and 7.0 GB or bandwidth; current video on demand was viewed by 99 uniques, with 154 views, and 7.4 GB of bandwidth; older video viewed included 41 uniques and 51 views.

The new live stream server had 77 unique viewers, viewing 132 views, with a total of 11 hours of video watched. While the majority of the live streams are viewed from Michigan, there are viewers from six other states.

Snowing and Blowing

December 1, 2019

Some of the residents of Beaver Island decided to stay home from any trips around the island. This video, submitted by Bob Tidmore, explains why they might make this decision.

Picture from Bob Tidmore's video

 

The First Sunday Mass of Advent

December 1, 2019

The Sunday morning Mass from Holy Cross was live streamed and recorded even on this blizzard-like winter storming weather day. The editor got stuck on the way to church. Even with windows clear, the roadway could not be determined due to the white-out conditions. Thanks to Jim Wojan and Levi Connor, the car is out and parked right where it will stay until the storm subsides.

The prayers and the first Advent candle is lit.

Jacque LaFreniere did the readings and Father Jim did the sermon.

View video of the service HERE

Phyllis' Daily Weather

December 1, 2019

Well, it's lightly snowing outside but we're not buried (at least so far). It's 30°, feels like 11°, humidity is 90%, dew point is at 27°, wind is from the east at 20 mph, pressure is 29.61 inches, wind gusts are at 33 mph, and visibility is 3 miles. Weather service people are predicting snow between 4 and 8 inches. We'll have to wait and see when it's all over. Marine forecast is as follows:

...GALE WARNING IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS EVENING...

Today Northeast wind up to 30 knots with gusts to around 40 knots. Snow through the day...mixed with rain in the morning. waves 4 to 7 feet.

Tonight Northeast wind 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 35 knots. Chance of snow. Waves 4 to 7 feet.

Monday Northeast wind 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 25 knots. Sunny. Waves 2 to 3 feet.

Monday Night West wind 10 to 15 knots. Partly cloudy. Waves 2 feet or less.

ON THIS DAY In Montgomery, Alabama, Rosa Parks is jailed for refusing to give up her seat on a public bus to a white man, a violation of the city’s racial segregation laws. The successful Montgomery Bus Boycott, organized by a young Baptist minister named Martin Luther King, Jr., followed Park’s historic act of civil disobedience.

“The mother of the civil rights movement,” as Rosa Parks is known, was born in Tuskegee, Alabama, in 1913. She worked as a seamstress and in 1943 joined the Montgomery chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

According to a Montgomery city ordinance in 1955, African Americans were required to sit at the back of public buses and were also obligated to give up those seats to white riders if the front of the bus filled up. Parks was in the first row of the black section when the white driver demanded that she give up her seat to a white man. Parks’ refusal was spontaneous but was not merely brought on by her tired feet, as is the popular legend. In fact, local civil rights leaders had been planning a challenge to Montgomery’s racist bus laws for several months, and Parks had been privy to this discussion.

Learning of Parks’ arrest, the NAACP and other African American activists immediately called for a bus boycott to be held by black citizens on Monday, December 5. Word was spread by fliers, and activists formed the Montgomery Improvement Association to organize the protest. The first day of the bus boycott was a great success, and that night the 26-year-old Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., told a large crowd gathered at a church, “The great glory of American democracy is the right to protest for right.” King emerged as the leader of the bus boycott and received numerous death threats from opponents of integration. At one point, his home was bombed, but he and his family escaped bodily harm.

The boycott stretched on for more than a year, and participants carpooled or walked miles to work and school when no other means were possible. As African Americans previously constituted 70 percent of the Montgomery bus ridership, the municipal transit system suffered gravely during the boycott. On November 13, 1956, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Alabama state and Montgomery city bus segregation laws as being in violation of the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. On December 20, King issued the following statement: “The year old protest against city buses is officially called off, and the Negro citizens of Montgomery are urged to return to the buses tomorrow morning on a non-segregated basis.” The boycott ended the next day. Rosa Parks was among the first to ride the newly desegregated buses.

Martin Luther King, Jr., and his nonviolent civil rights movement had won its first great victory. There would be many more to come.

Rosa Parks died on October 24, 2005. Three days later the U.S. Senate passed a resolution to honor Parks by allowing her body to lie in honor in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda. (history.com)

DID YOU KNOW When Boris Yeltsin met President Clinton in 1995, his first question was "Do you think O.J. did it?" (allthatsinteresting.com)

WORD OF THE DAY pointillistic (poyn-tuh-LISS-tik) which means:
1 : composed of many discrete details or parts
2 : of, relating to, or characteristic of pointillism or pointillists
In the late 19th century, Neo-Impressionists discovered that contrasting dots of color applied side by side would blend together and be perceived as a luminous whole when seen from a distance. With this knowledge, they developed the technique of pointillism, also known as divisionism. By the 1920s, the adjective pointillistic was being used as a word describing something having many details or parts, such as an argument or musical composition; it was then applied to the art of pointillism and its artists, the pointillists. (Merriam-Webster.com)

Saturday Mass from Holy Cross

November 30, 2019

The Saturday Vigil Mass at Holy Cross was at its usual time of 4 p.m. The celebrant was Father Jim Siler. The reader was Brian Foli. The Eucharistic Minister was Leona Pease.

The celebration of this first day of Advent was somewhat somber with the purposeful omission of the Glory to God and the Alleluia. The rest of the Mass parts were sung by the choir. This Mass was live streamed on http://beaverisland.tv

The baptismal font and the Advent candles

The service began.....Brian Foli reads.......Father Jim gives the sermon

View video of Saturday Mass HERE

Up To

by Cindy Ricksgers

What Did You Say 71

by Joe Moore

This is one of three books written about the EMS situations that have occurred on the most remote inhabited island in the Great Lakes. The first was “Rural EMS IS Different.” This is the second one, but all three have had additions and deletions. The third one is “Familiar Faces.”


None of these stories have provided any actual patient demographics or any data that would purposefully cause a typical community member to remember who the person in the story is, nor where the emergency took place, except by using the fictional references in the stories themselves.


You can guess that many of these stories have made me ask the question that titles this book, “What Did You Say?”

View the final chapter HERE

TV 9 and 10 Story of the Thanksgiving Plunge

by Joe Moore

The video and pictures from the video were due to the Dropbox upload of the video that BINN took of the event at the Jewell Gillespie Park. Unless there was someone standing right behind me and shooting at exactly the same angle, the pictures came from this video. BINN is quite happy that the story appeared on the news on Thanksgiving night. Here are the pictures used in the TV 9 and 10 story.

View video HERE

It might have been nice had they mentioned that this story came from Joe Moore, Beaver Island News on the 'Net.

Phyllis' Daily Weather

November 30, 2019

We are under a Winter Storm Warning from 7 pm this evening to 1 am Monday. If you do have to travel, take it slow and careful! It's 31° outside this morning, feels like 21°, wind is from the east at 14 mph, humidity is at 79%, dew point is 26°, pressure is at 30.21 inches, and visibility is 10 miles. It's anybody's guess if the storm will hit us or divide and go around us as usual. Guess we'll have to wait and see. Marine forecast is as follows:
...GALE WARNING IN EFFECT FROM THIS EVENING THROUGH SUNDAY EVENING...

TodayEast wind 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 35 knots. Slight chance of rain and snow in the afternoon. Waves 2 feet or less building to 3 to 5 feet.

Tonight East wind up to 30 knots with gusts to around 40 knots. Rain, snow, chance of drizzle and freezing rain. Waves 4 to 6 feet.

Sunday Northeast wind up to 30 knots with gusts to around 40 knots. Snow showers and a chance of light freezing rain. Waves 4 to 7 feet.

Sunday Night Northeast wind 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 30 knots. Snow showers likely and a chance of drizzle. Waves 4 to 6 feet.

ON THIS DAY in 2004, after winning 74 straight games and more than $2.5 million–a record for U.S. game shows–Jeopardy! contestant Ken Jennings loses. Jennings’ extended winning streak gave the game show a huge ratings boost and turned the software engineer from Salt Lake City, Utah into a TV hero and household name, at least temporarily. Barbara Walters named him one of the 10 most fascinating people of the year (along with Google co-founder Sergey Brin, Republican operative Karl Rove and hotel heiress-socialite Paris Hilton, among others) and Jennings appeared on such shows as Late Night with David Letterman, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno and even Sesame Street.

Jennings, who was born in 1974, outside of Seattle, Washington, graduated from Brigham Young University in 2000, where he headed the school’s national quiz bowl team.

At the time of Jennings’ appearance, Jeopardy! was well-established as one of the top-rated game shows in American history. Created by TV talk-show host and entertainment mogul Merv Griffin (1925-2007), Jeopardy! debuted in 1964 on NBC, with Art Fleming serving as host. Griffin (who went on to create another hugely popular, long-running game show, Wheel of Fortune, which premiered in 1975) suggested a format in which contestants were given trivia answers in a variety of categories and then required to come up with the questions. Cancelled in 1975, Jeopardy! returned briefly, airing from 1978 through 1979. In September 1984, a syndicated version of Jeopardy! launched with Alex Trebek as host and Johnny Gilbert as the announcer.

Trebek, who was born in 1940 in Sudbury, Ontario, began his broadcast career in Canada and moved to America in the early 1970s, where he hosted such game shows as High Rollers and Battlestars. In 1991, he became the first person ever to host three game shows at one time, when he served as master of ceremonies for Jeopardy! along with Classic Concentration and To Tell the Truth. After more than two decades on Jeopardy!, Trebek has become a pop-culture icon and has his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The erudite, articulate host is also a favorite parody target on Saturday Night Live and other shows. (history.com)

DID YOU KNOW It's a tradition in Ireland that if you donated a pint of blood, they give you a pint of Guinness to replace the iron. (allthatsinteresting.com)

WORD OF THE DAY incognito (in-kahg-NEE-toh) which means with one's identity concealed. The ancient Greeks and Romans knew that there were times when you didn't want to be recognized. For example, a myth tells how Zeus and Hermes visited a village incognito and asked for lodging. The apparently penniless travelers were turned away from every household except that of a poor elderly couple named Baucis and Philemon, who provided a room and a feast despite their own poverty. The Romans had a word that described someone or something unknown (like the gods in the tale): incognitus, a term that is the ancestor of our modern incognito. Cognitius is the past participle of the Latin verb cognoscere, which means "to know" and which also gives us recognize, among other words. (Merriam-webster.com)

Familiar Faces Postlude

by Joe Moore

As the thoughts of so many familiar faces continue to show up in my mind’s eye, this could continue chapter after chapter, but there has to be an ending.  That doesn’t mean that the stories will stop, but this collection of these emergency medical stories will come to an end.

The simple facts of EMS on this most remote inhabited island in the Great Lakes are interesting of themselves, and then you have to add the emergencies taking place in the Beaver Archipelago, outer islands around Beaver Island.  The many concepts of being completely isolated only make this even more interesting. 

Read the rest of the postlude HERE

Phyllis' Daily Weather

November 29, 2019

Now that I'm awake from that turkey coma - but boy, was it ever good - I can get on with the weather. It's 32° this morning, feels like 26°, wind is from the NE at 5 mph, humidity is 86%, dew point is 28°, pressure is 30.48 inches, and visibility is 10 miles. We are under a Winter Storm Watch which is in effect from Saturday evening through Sunday evening. Heavy wet snow and some ice accumulation in northern lower Michigan. Total snow accumulations of 7 to 13 inches and ice accumulations of around one tenth of an inch is POSSIBLE. Wind gusts could be as high as 35 mph. Maybe it'll be like other storms and pass around us. Marine forecast as follows:
...GALE WATCH IN EFFECT FROM SATURDAY EVENING THROUGH SUNDAY EVENING...

Today East wind 5 to 10 knots. Cloudy. Waves 2 feet or less.

Tonight East wind 15 to 20 knots. Mostly cloudy. Waves 2 to 3 feet.

Saturday East wind 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 30 knots. Chance of showers. Waves 3 to 5 feet.

Saturday Night East wind 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 35 knots. Rain showers with snow showers likely. Waves 3 to 5 feet.

ON THIS DAY in 1942, coffee joins the list of items rationed in the United States. Despite record coffee production in Latin American countries, the growing demand for the bean from both military and civilian sources, and the demands placed on shipping, which was needed for other purposes, required the limiting of its availability.

Scarcity or shortages were rarely the reason for rationing during the war. Rationing was generally employed for two reasons: (1) to guarantee a fair distribution of resources and foodstuffs to all citizens; and (2) to give priority to military use for certain raw materials, given the present emergency.

At first, limiting the use of certain products was voluntary. For example, President Roosevelt launched “scrap drives” to scare up throwaway rubber-old garden hoses, tires, bathing caps, etc.–in light of the Japanese capture of the Dutch East Indies, a source of rubber for the United States. Collections were then redeemed at gas stations for a penny a pound. Patriotism and the desire to aid the war effort were enough in the early days of the war.

But as U.S. shipping, including oil tankers, became increasingly vulnerable to German U-boat attacks, gas became the first resource to be rationed. Starting in May 1942, in 17 eastern states, car owners were restricted to three gallons of gas a week. By the end of the year, gas rationing extended to the rest of the country, requiring drivers to paste ration stamps onto the windshields of their cars. Butter was another item rationed, as supplies were reserved for military breakfasts. Along with coffee, the sugar and milk that went with it were also limited. All together, about one-third of all food commonly consumed by civilians was rationed at one time or another during the war. The black market, an underground source of rationed goods at prices higher than the ceilings set by the Office of Price Administration, was a supply source for those Americans with the disposable incomes needed to pay the inflated prices.

Some items came off the rationing list early; coffee was released as early as July 1943, but sugar was rationed until June 1947. (history.com)

DID YOU KNOW Enzo Ferrari told a man "you may be able to drive a tractor but you will never be able to handle a Ferrari properly." The man was so angry that he vowed to create the perfect car. His name was Ferruccio Lamborghini. (allthatsinteresting.com)

WORD OF THE DAY mutt (MUT) which means:
1 : a stupid or insignificant person : fool
2 : a mongrel dog : cur
Mutt can now be used with either affection or disdain to refer to a dog that is not purebred, but in the word's early history, in the U.S. around the turn of the 20th century, it could also be used to describe a person—and not kindly: mutt was another word for "fool." The word's history lies in another insult. It comes from muttonhead, another Americanism that also means essentially "fool." Muttonhead had been around since the early 19th century but it was not unlike an older insult with the same meaning: people had been calling one another "sheep's heads" since the mid-16th century. (Merriam-webster.com)

COA December Sunday Dinner

Community Thanksgiving Dinner

November 28, 2019

This tradition was set up many years ago. The purpose of this gathering was to provide a family style Thanksgiving Dinner for those that didn't have a family to have dinner with on this special day. For this editor, this is the favorite holiday of the year. Why? All the things that are favorite thing take place on this day. The island gathers at one church in a rotating basis and there is an Ecumenical Service. The editor gets to pray and play music at this service with and for all present. Then there is the next thing that this editor likes to do, and has been doing for but one year in the last 44 years, cook and carve turkeys for this dinner. That's why it is a favorite day!

Thanks to all the volunteers! Thanks to all who brought a dish to pass! Always, always a great potluck with the turkey and mashed potatoes provided!

Sixty plus people attended the dinner to eat, and several others came in to volunteer even though they did not eat. This was just one more example of the beauty of living on this island. Between these special things, there was a Polar Plunge (below) to raise money for the Beaver Island Food Pantry.

View a gallery of photos HERE

View a short video of those who attended HERE

The 1st Annual Thanksgiving Polar Plunge

November 28, 2019, at 11:30 a.m.

The started out as a challenge to try to raise about $200 for the Beaver Island Food Pantry. Michelle LaFreniere decided to post this Polar Plunge Challenge on facebook. As of the posting of this story on BINN, the facebook challenge has raised over $3200.00 for the BI Food Pantry through the donation button on facebook. There have been other donations as well including some mailed and some given the day of the challenge. Hilary Palmer seems to have been the idea lady for this event, and she began the event and did the countdown for those going into the chilled water.

The windchill just before the challenge was below thirty degrees with the air temperature just at freezing.

This is just one example of how the Beaver Island Community comes together to help those in need. Thank you to all those who participated! Thank you to all who donated! The BI Food Pantry should not have many issues this winter due to all of your efforts.

Michelle LaFreniere before the plunge

View a gallery of pictures of the participants and attendees HERE

View video of the Polar Plunge HERE

Michelle LaFreniere after the plunge

All done with the Polar Plunge

Community Thanksgiving Service

Thanksgiving Day at 10 a.m.

View bulletin for this service HERE

View the words for one hymn HERE

View video of the service HERE

Happy Thanksgiving!

Phyllis' Daily Weather

November 28, 2019

Happy Thanksgiving! I couldn't help being reminded of the memorable, wise words of Dylan Brody, - You know that just before the first Thanksgiving, there was one wise old Native American woman saying, “Don’t feed them. If you feed them, they’ll never leave.” Wishing you a safe, happy, Turkey Day!

Right now it's 31°, feels like 22°, partly cloudy, wind is from the north at 12 mph, humidity is 79%, dew point is 26°, pressure is 30.42 inches, and visibility is 10 miles. Marine forecast is as follows:

...SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL NOON EST TODAY...

Today Northeast wind 10 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots decreasing to 5 to 10 knots in the afternoon. Mostly cloudy early in the morning then becoming mostly sunny. Waves 3 to 5 feet subsiding to 2 to 3 feet in the afternoon.

Tonight East wind 5 to 10 knots. Mostly cloudy. Waves 2 feet or less.

Friday East wind 5 to 10 knots. Mostly cloudy. Waves 2 feet or less.

Friday Night East wind 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 20 knots. Cloudy. Waves 2 feet or less.

ON THIS DAY After sailing through the dangerous straits below South America that now bear his name, Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan enters the Pacific Ocean with three ships, becoming the first European explorer to reach the Pacific from the Atlantic.

On September 20, 1519, Magellan set sail from Spain in an effort to find a western sea route to the rich Spice Islands of Indonesia. In command of five ships and 270 men, Magellan sailed to West Africa and then to Brazil, where he searched the South American coast for a strait that would take him to the Pacific. He searched the Rio de la Plata, a large estuary south of Brazil, for a way through; failing, he continued south along the coast of Patagonia. At the end of March 1520, the expedition set up winter quarters at Port St. Julian. On Easter day at midnight, the Spanish captains mutinied against their Portuguese captain, but Magellan crushed the revolt, executing one of the captains and leaving another ashore when his ship left St. Julian in August.

On October 21, he finally discovered the strait he had been seeking. The Strait of Magellan, as it became known, is located near the tip of South America, separating Tierra del Fuego and the continental mainland. Only three ships entered the passage; one had been wrecked and another deserted. It took 38 days to navigate the treacherous strait, and when ocean was sighted at the other end Magellan wept with joy. His fleet accomplished the westward crossing of the ocean in 99 days, crossing waters so strangely calm that the ocean was named “Pacific,” from the Latin word pacificus, meaning “tranquil.” By the end, the men were out of food and chewed the leather parts of their gear to keep themselves alive. On March 6, 1521, the expedition landed at the island of Guam.

Ten days later, they dropped anchor at the Philippine island of Cebu—they were only about 400 miles from the Spice Islands. Magellan met with the chief of Cebu, who after converting to Christianity persuaded the Europeans to assist him in conquering a rival tribe on the neighboring island of Mactan. In fighting on April 27, Magellan was hit by a poisoned arrow and left to die by his retreating comrades.

After Magellan’s death, the survivors, in two ships, sailed on to the Moluccas and loaded the hulls with spice. One ship attempted, unsuccessfully, to return across the Pacific. The other ship, the Vittoria, continued west under the command of Basque navigator Juan Sebastian de Elcano. The vessel sailed across the Indian Ocean, rounded the Cape of Good Hope, and arrived at the Spanish port of Sanlucar de Barrameda on September 6, 1522, becoming the first ship to circumnavigate the globe. (history.com)

DID YOU KNOW There are more than 100,000 miles of blood vessels in your body. (allthatsinteresting.com/human-body-facts/4)

WORD OF THE DAY comestible (kuh-MESS-tuh-bul) which means edible. Did you expect comestible to be a noun meaning "food"? You're probably not alone. As it happens, comestible is used both as an adjective and a noun. The adjective is by far the older of the two; it has been part of English since at least the 1400s. In fact, one of its earliest known uses was in a text printed in 1483 by William Caxton, the man who established England's first printing press. The noun (which is most often used in the plural form comestibles) dates to the late 1700s. (Merriam-webster.com)

How Windy Is Windy

November 27, 2019

It was windy enough for some people to have a tree take out the power. It was windy enough that the BIBCO ferry did not run. It was windy enough out for the predicted nine or ten foot waves on Lake Michigan. It was windy enough out to have the water come over the sand at the public beach. It was windy enough for the water to cover the roadway on Gull Harbor Road out by the last house including the driveway. It was windy enough to cause more erosion along the East Side Drive homes.

The west side of Beaver Island had very little wave action at Donegal Bay. Most of the windy issues took place closer to the northern and eastern shores of the island. There were trees down across the roadways as far south as Fox Lake. There were trees down across Donegal Bay Road, Lake Drive, and others. The last the editor saw was the GLE truck going down Pine Chip Trail. All of this took place before 3 p.m. on Thanksgiving Eve Day.

A few pictures were taken, along with a little video of the waves and the wind.

View a gallery of photos HERE

View video of this HERE

Cackling Goose

November 26, 2019

On a previous day, the editor captured the behavior of these birds, possibly mating behavior, at least it looked similar to the mating behavior of the loons. Anyway, a phone of some interesting birds at Whiskey Point, sent the editor out for some more pictures, and it is believed this is the same pair.

The birds in question

View a short video of the geese HERE

Phyllis' Daily Weather

November 27, 2019

Holy moley it's nasty out and I'm beyond glad that I changed all my appointments to January. The wind is really howling! Right now I'm showing 39°, feels like 28°, there's been .88 of an inch of rain so far, the wind is from the east at 27 mph, humidity is 95%, dew point is 38°, and pressure is 29.36 inches. Marine forecast is as follows:

...STORM WARNING IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 AM EST THIS MORNING...

Today Northeast wind up to 30 knots with gusts to around 50 knots becoming north 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 30 knots early in the evening. Slight chance of thunderstorms early in the morning. Rain through the day. Waves 4 to 7 feet. Waves occasionally around 9 feet.

Tonight North wind up to 30 knots with gusts to around 35 knots. Chance of rain. Waves 5 to 8 feet.

Thursday Northeast wind 15 to 20 knots with gusts to around 25 knots. Mostly sunny. Waves 3 to 5 feet.

Thursday Night East wind 5 to 10 knots. Mostly cloudy. Waves 2 feet or less. winds and waves higher in the vicinity of thunderstorms.

Stay safe out there. I know parts of the island are without power. Kudos in advance to Mike McDonough and crew who have to be out in this mess working on it.

ON THIS DAY in 2005, Aerosmith and 50 Cent headline a $10 million bat mitzvah.

For seasoned showbiz veterans Steven Tyler and Joe Perry of Aerosmith—middle-aged men long past worrying over their perceived “legitimacy”— the offer of a $2 million appearance fee for a 45-minute performance at a private event in New York City must have been a true no-brainer. For Curtis James Jackson III, on the other hand, there were likely competing impulses. Jackson—better known as the rapper 50 Cent—had built his professional persona on the image of a street-hardened former criminal who was tough enough to survive being shot nine times at point-blank range in 2001. So there were legitimate concerns that his image might take a hit if word leaked out about the event in question.

Ultimately, however, Mr. Jackson made the decision that the title of his multi-platinum 2003 album Get Rich or Die Tryin’ suggested he might: In exchange for a multimillion-dollar fee, 50 Cent took to the stage at New York City’s famous Rainbow Room in the early morning hours of this day in 2005, joining Tyler and Perry as headline performers at the $10 million bat mitzvah of Long Island 13-year-old Elizabeth Brooks

According to the ensuing coverage of the event in the New York Daily News, guests at the Brooks bat mitzvah began their celebration unaware of what lay ahead. When a soprano-sax player who looked suspiciously like Kenny G turned out, in fact, to be Kenny G, the bizarrely star-studded event was only getting started. In the hours preceding the appearances of Aerosmith and 50 Cent, former A-list stars Don Henley, Stevie Nicks and Tom Petty all graced the stage at the Rainbow Room, entertaining guests who had been given gift bags containing upwards of $1,000 in personal electronics, including digital cameras that 50 Cent’s bodyguard reportedly tried and failed to stop guests from using to snap keepsake photos of the event. Within days, however, those photos had appeared on numerous Internet blogs, along with thousands of snarky comments about 50 Cent’s questionable “gangsta” credibility.

The father who spent $10 million celebrating his daughter’s coming-of-age was defense contractor David H. Brooks, CEO of DHB Industries, a Long Island company that manufactured body armor for the United States military. Two years after the lavish event, Brooks was served with a 71-page federal indictment featuring charges of insider trading, tax evasion and raiding his company’s coffers for personal gain—including for the $10 million he used to pay for his daughter’s lavish bat mitzvah. (history.com)

DID YOU KNOW that when listening to music, your heartbeat will sync with the rhythm. (allthatsinteresting.com)

WORD OF THE DAY fawn {verb} (FAWN)
1 : to court favor by a cringing or flattering manner
2 : to show affection — used especially of a dog
Some people will be glad to learn the origins of fawn—and there's a hint about the word's etymology in that declaration. Middle English speakers adapted an Old English word meaning "to rejoice" to create the verb faunen, which shifted in spelling over time to become fawn. That Old English word, in turn, derives from fagan, meaning "glad." Fagan is also an ancestor of the English adjective fain, whose earliest (now obsolete) meaning is "happy" or "pleased." This fawn is not, however, related to the noun fawn, referring to a young deer. For that we can thank the Latin noun fetus, meaning "offspring." (Merriam-Webster.com)

Phyllis' Daily Weather

November 26, 2019

The Emerald Isle is home and at the dock after weeks of dry dock!! So nice to see her back where she belongs. It's 42° this morning, feels like 37°, right now the wind is from the NNW at 9 mph (more on the wind later), humidity is at 73%, dew point is 34°, pressure is 29.77 inches, and visibility is 10 miles. We have cloudy skies. As the day wears on the wind will pick up with rain developing overnight. We are under a wind Advisory until noon on Wednesday. Winds will be from the east at 25 to 35 mph and could occasionally gust over 50 mph. Marine forecast is as follows:

...STORM WARNING IN EFFECT FROM LATE TONIGHT THROUGH WEDNESDAY EVENING...

Today Northwest wind 10 to 15 knots with gusts to around 20 knots becoming northeast 5 to 10 knots early in the evening. Mostly cloudy. Waves 2 to 4 feet subsiding to 2 feet or less in the afternoon.

Tonight East wind up to 30 knots. Gusts to around 50 knots late. Rain. Waves 4 to 7 feet.

Wednesday East wind up to 30 knots with gusts to around 45 knots. Rain. Waves 4 to 7 feet.

Wednesday Night North wind 15 to 25 knots with gusts to around 30 knots. Chance of rain. Waves 4 to 7 feet.

ON THIS DAY in 1862, Oxford mathematician Charles Lutwidge Dodgson sends a handwritten manuscript called Alice’s Adventures Under Ground to 10-year-old Alice Liddell.

The 30-year-old Dodgson, better known by his nom de plume Lewis Carroll, made up the story one day on a picnic with young Alice and her two sisters, the children of one of Dodgson’s colleagues. Dodgson, the son of a country parson, had been brilliant at both mathematics and wordplay since childhood, when he enjoyed making up games. However, he suffered from a severe stammer, except when he spoke with children. He had many young friends who enjoyed his fantastic stories: The Liddell children thought his tale of a girl who falls down a rabbit hole was one of his best efforts, and Alice insisted he write it down.

During a visit to the Liddells, English novelist Henry Kingsley happened to notice the manuscript. After reading it, he suggested to Mrs. Liddell that it be published. Dodgson published the book at his own expense, under the name Lewis Carroll, in 1865. The story is one of the earliest children’s books written simply to amuse children, not to teach them. The book’s sequel, Through the Looking Glass, was published in 1871. Dodgson’s other works, including a poetry collection called Phantasmagoria and Other Poems, and another children’s book, Sylvia and Bruno, did not gain the same enduring popularity as the Alice books. Dodgson died in 1898. (history.com)

DID YOU KNOW that between birth and death, the human body goes from having 300 bones, to just 206. (allthatisinteresting.com/human-body-facts)

WORD OF THE DAY retinue (RET-uh-noo) which means a group of retainers or attendants. Retinue derives via Middle English from the Anglo-French verb retenir, meaning "to retain." Another word deriving from retenir is retainer, which means, among other things, "one who serves a person of high position or rank." In the 14th century, that high person of rank was usually a noble or a royal of some kind, and retinue referred to that person's collection of servants and companions. Nowadays, the word is often used with a bit of exaggeration to refer to the assistants, guards, publicists, and other people who accompany an actor or other high-profile individual in public. You might also hear such a collection called a suite or entourage, two other words derived from French. (Merriam-Webster.com)

Hemlock Survey Letter

November 25, 2019

As noted and should be stressed is that this survey is voluntary offered to private property owners and free of charge thanks to a grant from The Nature Conservancy (Shaun Howard, TNC).  This survey takes place during the winter-probably in February-same as last year. (from Pam Grassmick)

Thanks to a grant from The Nature Conservancy, the CAKE CISMA is gearing up for our second hemlock survey season, to monitor and detect any potential hemlock woolly adelgid infestations in our service area. For those that may be unfamiliar with this invasive species, the hemlock woolly adelgid (or HWA) is a parasitic insect that feeds exclusively on hemlock trees. If left untreated, infested hemlocks can die in as little as 4-10 years. This invasive species is working its way north, supposedly using the Lake Michigan shoreline as its primary avenue to expand its range. If left unchecked, Michigan’s native hemlock population could be in serious trouble. We are preparing to survey both public and private lands to ensure that this species does not establish itself in Northern Michigan.

I have attached a letter informing about this critical issue and what is currently being done. On the back side of the letter is a land access consent form, giving permission to the CISMA to access private property to survey hemlocks. This survey is cost-free to the landowner through the grant. If you could please circulate this letter through your organization and to your members, and perhaps print some copies for display in your lobbies (as applicable), this would be very helpful and greatly appreciated. Our goal this survey season is to fill in gaps from last year on private lands. If you need me to print some and send some to you, please let me know and I'll be happy to provide you with some.

As always, thank you for partnering with us! We appreciate the potential to work with each of you in helping preserve and protect one of Northern Michigan's beloved evergreens, the Eastern Hemlock.

Sincerely,

Benjamin VanDyke

View the letter HERE

The Beaver Islander

November 25, 2019

This vessel was built in 1962 by Sturgeon Bay Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. out of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin and purchased new by Beaver Island Boat Company. She is 95 feet in length, 27 feet wide, draws 8 feet with a top speed of 13.5 knots and maximum capacity 172 passengers and 10 vehicles. (from bibco.com)

The Beaver Islander has been serving Beaver Island residents and visitors for 57 years this year of 2019. As the Emerald Isle is getting a conplete overhaul this year, the Beaver Islander has been doing the November schedule. With severe storms and wind storms, the Islander runs when it can, as many times as needed.

Today, the Beaver Islander was on a run from Charlevoix. The pictures below were captured as it came into Paradise Bay.

View a small gallery of photos HERE

Weather by Joe

November 25, 2019

This morning on Carlisle Road, the temeprature is a balmy 40 degrees. The pressure is 29.55 with visibility of nine miles. It is cloudy. The dewpoint is 38 degrees and humidity is 99%.

TODAY, it is expected to be cloudy in the morning with showers in the afternoon. The showers may be on and off. The high will be near 45. The chance of rain is 40%. Wind will be from the south at 10 to 20 mph.

TONIGHT, it is forecast for only a 20% chance of rain with a low near 37 degrees. There will be a few clouds. The wind will switch to the WSW at 10 to 15 mph.

TOMORROW, it is forecast for cloudy skies with a high near 40 degrees. There is a 10% chance of rain. Winds will switch to the NNW at 5 to 10 mph.

WORD OF THE DAY; sempiternal; (sem-pih-TER-nul); adjective; of never ending duration

Despite their similarities, sempiternal and eternal come from different roots. Sempiternal is derived from the Late Latin sempiternalis and ultimately from semper, Latin for "always." (You may recognize semper as a key element in the motto of the U.S. Marine Corps: semper fidelis, meaning "always faithful.") Eternal, on the other hand, is derived, by way of Middle French and Middle English, from the Late Latin aeternalis and ultimately from aevum, Latin for "age" or "eternity." Sempiternal is much less common than eternal, but some writers have found it useful. 19th-century American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson, for example, wrote, "The one thing which we seek with insatiable desire is to forget ourselves, … to lose our sempiternal memory, and to do something without knowing how or why…."

ON THIS DAY

Three days after his assassination in Dallas, Texas, John F. Kennedy is laid to rest with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, was shot to death while riding in an open-car motorcade with his wife and Texas Governor John Connally through the streets of downtown Dallas. Ex-Marine and communist sympathizer Lee Harvey Oswald was the alleged assassin. Kennedy was rushed to Dallas’ Parkland Hospital, where he was pronounced dead 30 minutes later. He was 46.

Vice President Lyndon Johnson, who was three cars behind President Kennedy in the motorcade, was sworn in as the 36th president of the United States less than two hours later. He took the presidential oath of office aboard Air Force One as it sat on the runway at Dallas Love Field airport. The swearing in was witnessed by some 30 people, including Jacqueline Kennedy, who was still wearing clothes stained with her husband’s blood. Seven minutes later, the presidential jet took off for Washington.

The next day, November 23, President Johnson issued his first proclamation, declaring November 25 to be a day of national mourning for the slain president. On that day, hundreds of thousands of people lined the streets of Washington to watch a horse-drawn caisson bear Kennedy’s body from the Capitol Rotunda to St. Matthew’s Catholic Cathedral for a requiem Mass. The solemn procession then continued on to Arlington National Cemetery, where leaders of 99 nations gathered for the state funeral. Kennedy was buried with full military honors on a slope below Arlington House, where an eternal flame was lit by his widow to forever mark the grave.

Snow on the Rocks?

The other morning we had a little snow on the ground. A ride to the point seemed to be in order, so off to Whiskey Point the car headed. Upon arrival, an early morning glance suggested that there were some rocks off the point and that they were covered with snow......UNTIL..... the rocks moved.

There were not rocks where there were not rocks before. There wasn't much snow on anything, and, finally, the eyes actually opened enough to see what what really there.

The moving rocks were mute swans.

Cackling Geese

November 24, 2019

It wasn't a definited identification, but these geese were smaller and didn't have the same honking as the other geese. Thinking they were perhaps just a small Canadian goose was quite a normal thing to do, but taking a picture, and using a bird identification program convinced the editor that we were actually dealing with a different kind of goose.

The next interesting thing about this pair was that they were doing some of the same things that the loon pairs have done on Barney's Lake. This pair was in the harbor, but the interesting behavior suggested that this might be some mating ritual that was captured in the pictures.

No matter what these geese may have been doing, it was quite interesting to watch in the harbor.

Mass from Holy Cross

November 24, 2019

The reader on Saturday was Brian Foli. The reader on Sunday was Jacque LaFreniere.

The celebrant was Father Jim Siler.

View video of Saturday Mass HERE

View video os Sunday Mass HERE

Christian Church Service

November 24, 2019

View video of the service HERE

USCG Cutter Mackinaw Swaps Buoys

November 20, 2019

(8 a.m.) The USCG Cutter Mackinaw was seen in the harbor this morning at day break. The purpose of the trip to the island was to swap out the buoys; the bell buoy and the channel buoys in the harbor as well as the Garden Island buoy and others. The Mackinaw crew connected to the bell buoy after launching the smaller vessel. The smaller vessel came into the harbor to work on the channel buoys from the BIBCO dock over to the Beaver Island Marine dock. While the channel buoys were replaced, the Mackinaw was pulling the bell buoy at Whiskey Point. After the bell buoy was on board, the Mackinaw removed the channel buoys from the smaller vessel. The smaller vessel headed over to get the Garden Island buoy.

While the smaller vessel headed toward Garden Island, the Mackinaw worked to put the smaller buoys away. Then the ice buoy was hoisted, the anchor chains were connected, and the ice buoy was placed in the mouth of the harbor to replace the removed bell buoy.

View video of the swap HERE

View a gallery of photos HERE

ST JAMES TOWNSHIP PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE

NOVEMBER 20, 2019 @ 1:00PM

View agenda HERE

Beaver Island Airport Commission Minutes

November 12, 2019

View minutes HERE

Crazy Clinical Cases

by Joe Moore

(This is a repeat posting that was requested to demonstrate the "Rural EMS is Different" book written by me.)

Every Emergency Medical Technician in the State of Michigan is required to attend clinical rotations to gain experience in the real world beyond the classrooms.  My basic EMT clinical included sometimes boring cases of coughs and colds by patients who use the emergency room like a doctor's office at all hours of the day and night.  There were several shifts with a northern Michigan ambulance service without a single ambulance call. The best basic EMT clinical rotation occurred at Northern Michigan Hospital Emergency Room.  One patient stands out in my mind.  Another ambulance service brought in an 80 year old female laying flat on her back gasping for breath with blue lips and no oxygen.  The ER was quite busy, I remember, and the nurse taking report from the crew. heard about the history of congestive heart failure, and couldn't get the patient off the ambulance cot fast enough. 

Read the rest of the story HERE

Public Meeting Dates

View HERE

An Excellent MSU Article about Invasive Species

Local resident Pam Grassmick is included in this article.

Read the article HERE

Traditional Christmas Cantata Returns

By Joe Moore


The last Christmas Cantata was performed in 2017.  This was the eighteenth annual cantata performed in the Beaver Island Christian Church.  Earlier cantatas had two days of performances, but the decreasing population and the decreasing number of singers brought the performance down to just one, usually in early December.  This eighteenth cantata was directed by Sheri Richards.

Quite a few years in a row, there was help with the Cantata by Mike and Shelly Scripps. There have been several contributions by them over the years. We hope to have some prior members of the choir join us with this year's joyful singing.


In 2018, there was a gathering of singers and performers at the Christian Church led by Phil Becker, but no cantata was performed this past year.  Phil put his heart and soul into this carol sing and music presentation. 
This year, Judi Meister, Kathy Speck, and Joe Moore got together with the goal to resurrect the Christmas Cantata.  The rehearsals have been taking place every Sunday at 11:15 am at the Christian Church with sectionals taking place also based upon the schedules of those singing.


The 2019 Christmas Cantata is entitled “Let the Whole World Sing” by Joel Raney.  This cantata allows the audience to participate with some Christmas carols sung by all that are present, the choir and the audience.
This year’s performance will take place on December 8, 2019, at 2 p.m. at the Beaver island Christian Church.  The conductor this year will be the returning conductor of the majority of the cantatas over the years, Kathy Speck.

Community Thanksgiving Dinner

This is the second posting asking for volunteers for our annual Thanksgiving dinner. So far there has been little response. "COMMUNITY" is the operative word. This means if the dinner is to continue, we need help in many ways from the COMMUNITY. If we do not get enough volunteers to help, this dinner just might not happen.

Please consider how you may help. We still need someone to cook a turkey, peel potatoes, table set up and decorate, after dinner clean up, dishwasher, pot and pan washer, ets. Please call Mary Ellen Dawson 2043 or Judi Meister 2963.

     

Links

Cinematic Tour of Beaver Island

The Chamber of Commerce of Beaver Island has posted this, and BINN found it on facebook. It's a very nice video, viewable on YouTube.

View it here

Holocaust Survivor Martin Lowenberg

Video by Kaylyn Jones HERE

The Beaver Island Water Trail

The Beaver Island Water Trail is active.เธข  Check out the paddling guide.

Water Trail website HERE

See paddling guide HERE

 

Anti-Bullying Presentation to BICS Parents

View presentation HERE

Link to the Beaver Island Airport 10-year Plan

On the Beach of Beaver Island

You will need Quicktime or another music player to enjoy this link.

The music played in the Holy Cross Hall in the late 70's and early 80's, recorded for posterity and shared here.

When Santa Missed the Boat to Beaver Island

as read by Phil Gregg

Click HERE

Meeting Minutes

The minutes of all public meetings will be posted

as soon as they are received.

News on the 'Net welcomes minutes to all public meetings. All organizations are welcome to submit meeting minutes for publication on this website. Please email them to medic5740@gmail.com.

Airport Committee Minutes

Beaver Island Cultural Arts Association Minutes

Beaver Island District Library Board Minutes

Peaine Township Board Minutes

BIRHC Board Meeting Minutes

St. James Township Meeting Minutes

Beaver Island Community School Board Meeting Minutes

Beaver Island Ecotourism Goals Draft, rev. 3, 19 Jan 2010

Beaver Island Natural Resources and Eco-Tourism Steering Committee Minutes

Beaver Island Transportation Authority Minutes

Joint Human Resources Commission Minutes

Waste Management Committee Minutes

Beaver Island Airport Commission Minutes New for 2011!

Subscriptions Expire

You can subscribe online by using PayPal and a credit card. Please click the link below if you wish to renew online:

RENEW

Transfer Station Hours

October 30, 2019

The Transfer Station Winter Hours are 11:00 a.m til 5:p.m. Monday thru Saturday effective this Friday.

BICS Fall Sports Schedules

Volleyball

Soccer

Waste Management Committee Meeting Schedule

1st Tuesday of the Month at 1 p.m. at Peaine Hall

View schedule HERE

Great Lakes Islanders Find Common Concerns

Great Lakes Islands Alliance gathers for third annual meeting

The article talks about the last meeting of these island representatives and their common areas of concern. The article has some great pictures as well.

View the article HERE

St. James Special Meeting

November 22, 2019, at Noon

The purpose of the meeting today was to provide authorization for the supervisor to submit a grant application as well as a grant letter for the purposes of getting funding for the project of fuel dock improvements at the new marina. The supervisor was granted authority to submit an application to the Grand Traverse Band.

Draft Minutes of the Waste Management Meeting

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 at 1:00PM

View the minutes HERE

DRAFT Minutes of Beaver Island Telecommunication Advisory Committee Meeting, November 20, 2019 5:00PM

View minutes HERE

https://www.merit.edu/services/moonshot/

Beaver Island Community School Weekly Update


November 22, 2019

Thank you to the Volunteers of our BICS Thanksgiving Feast!
Traditions are so important to schools and communities. We could not carry many of our school traditions without the support of our parents, families, and community at large. Thank You!

Thanksgiving Break
Thanksgiving break is next week! There will be no school starting on Wednesday, November 27th and we return to school December 2nd. Have a wonderful time with friends and family. While you are recovering from your tryptophan slumber, reflect on everything for which you are thankful.

Can Sorting Scheduled for THIS Sunday, November 24th at 1:00 pm
Reminder---The next can sorting is THIS Sunday, November 24th. This is the last can sorting before the boat stops running. We need to clear the Transfer station of returnables to make room for the cans and bottles that will come in over the winter.

B.I Fit Volunteers Needed
B.I Fit is looking for CPR certified volunteers to man B.I Fit a couple days a month.  Hours of operation are Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, from 9-11 am. No worries if you are not yet certified in CPR, the great folks at Beaver Island EMS have many CPR classes to get you ready!  If interested, please contact BICS office.

Rural School Funding Still in Jeopardy  
This note is starting to get old. But yes, the students of Beaver Island, Grand Marais, Paradise, Drummond Island, and Mackinac Island continue to be used as pawns in a political game over the state budget. The latest play in this game is by Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey. Apparently, there was an agreement on the table, but Senator Shirkey is holding up that agreement by demanding that Governor Whitmer give up some of her executive authority before he will agree to restoring our funding. Hopefully, when the legislators get back from Thanksgiving break, they will be able to work together for the benefit of students and communities across rural Michigan.

Great Lakes Islands Basketball Tournament December 6th & 7th on Mackinac Island
The 2nd annual Great Lakes Islands Basketball Tournament will be held on Mackinac Island the weekend of December 6th & 7th.  The teams playing will be Beaver Island, Mackinac Island, Put-In-Bay, & Washington Island.

Mark Your Calendars December 12th Performing Arts Student Play
Under the direction of Diana Behl, the BICS secondary Performing Arts Class students will be presenting the one act play “A Thing of Beauty” by Maurice Berger. December 12th time 7:00 pm at the Beaver Island Community Center.

December Events--Mark Your Calendars
Friday 6th & Saturday 7th – Great Lakes Islands Basketball Tournament
Thursday 12th – Performing Arts Student Play
Wednesday 18th - Santa’s Workshop
Thursday 19th – Holiday Caroling
Saturday 21st to January 5th – Winter Break

Have a Great Weekend and HAPPY THANKGIVING!

Taking Time for Art

by Cindy Ricksgers

Peaine Township Recreation Plan Draft

View the plan HERE

This plan will be going to the Peaine Township Board at the December meeting.

Special St. James Township

November 22, 2019, at Noon, at Governental Center, Kings Highway

The purpose of the meeting is to authorize the application of the tribal grant allocation to assist with fuel dock repair.

View notice HERE

BIA's Letter to USACE

The Beaver Island Association's president Kevin Boyle has submitted a letter to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dated November 12, 2019. This letter includes some pictures that show the seriousness of the issue. News on the 'Net also took some time to check out the erosion issues on the east side of the island. This article below is the posting done regarding the erosion including pictures and video. The BIA letter is presented below with the BINN story down below the letter.

View BIA letter HERE

Around the Horn and Erosion

November 8, 2019

by Editor Moore

The purpose to make a trip around the island to check our the progress on the emergency phones, the leaves, the snow, and the erosion was on tap today. The trip took two plus hours with the plans to stop and visit someone not working out. Every trip either starts or ends with a trip to the point, so this began the trip today. A photo gallery shows the entire trip. The video only shows the erosion.

Some homes endangered by water and waves:

Thanks to Pam Grassmick--the above photos.

View photo gallery HERE

View erosion video HERE

Announcements/Ads

Beaver Island Telecommunication Advisory Committee Meeting Schedule

2019-2020

St James Township Meeting Time Change

St James Township Regular Monthly Meeting times have changed from 5:00 PM to 5:30 PM.เธข  The board will continue to meet on the first Wednesday of each month at the St James Township Hall at the Point.เธข เธข 

BICS Basketball Schedule

19-20 Basketball Practice Schedule

BI BBall Game Schedule

Transportation Authority Meeting Schedule

View schedule HERE

Island Summit Final Reports

The Island Summit took place down at the CMU Biological Center on the east side of Beaver Island this past September from the 23-25. There were participants from twelve Great Lakes islands. These are the reports from that summit.

Short Summary

Complete Report

BIRHC Board Meeting Dates

2019 Meeting Dates

September 21

December 14 (Annual Meeting)

Meetings are on Saturdays at 10 AM in the BIRHC Community Room
37304 Kings Highway

Beaver Island Airport Committee Meeting Schedule for 2020

Time is noon at the BI Airport

February 3, 2020

April 20, 2020

August 17, 2010

October 26, 2020

Library Story Times



Please join early childhood educator, Kim Mitchell, for story time with your baby, toddler, or preschooler beginning Monday, September 11. 2017, at 10:30 a.m.. As well as reading stories, also included are songs, finger plays, movement, art, and free-play. Each week will focus on a specific theme along with activities to develop listening, socialization, gross and fine motor skill-building, creativity, as well as play-time while caregivers get a chance to socialize, and of course, check out books!

No cost is required, but registration is appreciated so enough materials are available, though visitors to the island are welcome to drop-in. Kim has taught toddler play groups for Lamaze and preschool and has numerous books, toys, and activities she would love to share. If interested, please contact Kim at beaverislandkim@gmail.com or call 448-2532.

New Library Hours

The Beaver Island District Library is pleased to announce new hours of operation intended to optimize the availability of our facility, staff, and resources to the school.

*Note also the new closing time for the school year.*

Weekdays:เธข เธข  8:30 - 5:00

Saturday:เธข เธข  12:00 - 5:00

Weekdays during scheduled school breaks, the library will open at 10:00 and close at 5:00.

Public Meeting Dates

View HERE

REGULAR MEETING DATES Posting040119

List including St. James Finanace and Public Works Committee Meeting HERE

Holy Cross Church Bulletin

November Bulletin

 

 

Christmas Bazaar Was Today

The Christmas Bazaar was today, November 17, 2019, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. This annual event took place at the Gregg Fellowship Center. There was a wide variety of gifts available. There was music to help start the spirit of the holidays! The music started about 12:30 p.m. and continued on until almost 2 p.m. The Christmas music was performed by Sheri Richards, Cynthia Pryor, and Joe Moore, a string trio of violin, viola, and cello.

View a gallery of photos from the bazaar HERE

View video of the tables and the music HERE

Waste Management Documents for November

BIWMC November 2019 Draft Agenda

Special Bulk Waste Service or _Special Handling Day(s)_ Programs

TS Annual Performance Evaluation Policy and Process

St. James Committee Minutes

sjtfcmin.11.04.19- Finance Committee

sjtpwcminnov1.2019--Public Works Committee

B. I. Community School Board Packet

November 11, 2019

View the board packet HERE

Peaine Township Meeting

November 11, 2019

Peaine Agenda November

BIAC Minimum Standards Airport

Peaine Airport Fund

Peaine General Fund

Peaine Waste Management Fund

Peaine Minutes October 2019

View video of the meeting HERE

Peaine Planning Documents November

DRAFT_Peaine_RecPlan_110419

PTPCagn111219

BITA Meeting Rescheduled

TUESDAY, November 19, 2019
12:00 PM

Notice November 12 2019 regular meeting rescheduled

Oct 8 2019 reg meeting minutes draft

Oct 8, 2019 BITA Annual Meeting draft minutes

St. James Township Meeting, 11/6/19

Additional Documents

Beaver Island Invasive Species Administration

BUDGET NOTES FOR November 6, 2019 Amendment

DRAFT Minutes of 10022019 Regular[9072]

November 2019 Budget Amendement Resolution

Terrestrial Invasive Species Ordinance - Draft

Updated Draft Minutes of 101619 Board Work Meeting

November financials 2019

Attendees............................Board.........

View video HERE

For Islands, By Islands


3rd Annual Great Lakes Islands Summit Hosted on Mackinac Island

 

Mackinac Island, MI -There are nearly 30 year-round island communities in the Great Lakes. Though independent by choice, they are facing economic, social, and ecological challenges that require a higher degree of collaboration and cooperation.

On October 20 -23, 2019, over 130 people from 14 Great Lakes islands convened at Mission Point Resort on Mackinac Island, Michigan, for the 3rd Annual Great Lakes Islands Summit. This meeting serves as the annual member meeting for the Great Lakes Islands Alliance (GLIA). The Summit is the only Great Lakes-wide event dedicated to the needs of island communities to foster relationships and share information Great Lakes island living.

“I’m often asked how this organization is benefitting Drummond Island and my answer is simple. ‘Great Lakes islands share many common challenges. As a single island we are easily overlooked when facing challenges, but as a group of islands we are able to leverage our experiences through the GLIA network and have a more amplified voice” said Kristy Beyer, GLIA Steering Committee Member. “I’m proud of the work we are doing and excited about the network we are establishing.”

GLIA voluntary network connecting individual island leaders and developing tools to aid collaboration. This year’s attendance nearly doubled, proving the validity of this bi-national group as an important network with a unique purpose. Thanks to the administrative support of Northland College, the group was awarded a $50,000 grant from the Mott Foundation. With this financial support, GLIA will spend the next 12 months establishing the Great Lakes Islands Alliance as a legal entity, an influential voice for policies to protect the interests of Great Lakes islands and continue to provide a support network for year-round island communities.

Featured speakers at the 2019 Summit included Lisa Powers, chairwoman of the Mackinac Bands of Chippewa and Ottawa Indians; Phil Porter, Director, Mackinac State Historic Parks; Eric Ellis, Project Manager, Great Lakes Commission; Lisa Brush founder and executive director of the award-winning Stewardship Network.

Several informational breakout sessions provided insight on tourism, affordable housing, health care, environmental conservation, schools, faith communities, infrastructure, and more. Guided field trips to the school, library, airport, medical center, fire and police department, solid waste handling facility, water treatment plant, and Fort Mackinac allowed fellow islanders a chance to see how Mackinac Island addresses these essential necessities.

The GLIA members from Mackinac Island took significant responsibility for arranging logistics and designing agenda content for this year’s event. Additional assistance and oversight was provided by the GLIA Steering Committee, GLIA staff coordinator Matt Preisser with the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy, and valued partner organizations of Northland College and the Island Institute.

The event was hosted at the Mission Point Resort, which provided a beautiful setting for the event. Financial support for the 2019 Great Lakes Islands Summit was made possible by the Mackinac Island Community Foundation, Grand Hotel, Island Airways, and the Mackinac Bands of Chippewa and Ottawa Indians.

The 2020 Great Lakes Island Summit will take place at the member islands in Lake Erie. To learn more about GLIA, visit www.greatlakesislandsalliance.org.

About GLIA
The Great Lakes Islands Alliance (GLIA) is voluntary, collaborative network that brings together island leaders, residents, and advocates from across the Great Lakes region. The mission of GLIA is to encourage relationship building, foster information exchange, and leverage resources to address shared challenges and embrace opportunities to benefit islands within the Great Lakes.

INFORMATION RELEASE

Kristy Beyer
Drummond Island Tourism Association (906) 493-5245 or (231) 330-4389
kristy@visitdrummondisland.com

October 25, 2019

From Charlevoix County COA

Good Morning,

Just a note to keep you up to date on what is going on with the COA and to respond to requests for more information.  Please find attached the November 2019 Senior Hi-Lites Newsletter.  Should you have ANY questions about program requirements or qualifications, please contact Kathie our Site Coordinator on Beaver Island or Sheri Shepard in the COA Office. 

The Beaver Island In-Home Reimbursement Program

SERVICES COVERED:

Personal Care can include: Bed bath, sponge bath, or shower, Foot Care (no cutting nails), Hair Care (wash, dry, roller set style-NO cutting hair), Skin (wash, apply lotion), Oral Care (brush teeth, soak, and wash dentures) Perineal Care(assist), Dressing (assist with dressing and laying out clothes for night and morning), Colostomy Care (empty bag, replace), Catheter Care(wash), Toileting, Assist with TED hose. Homemaking duties may include: Bed linens changed, make the bed, dust wash dishes, take out the trash, clean kitchen, clean stove, clean refrigerator, vacuum, sweep, mop, clean bathroom, grocery shop, errands, bring in mail and laundry. Respite Care can include: Bed bath, sponge bath or shower, Foot Care (no cutting nails), Hair Care (wash, dry roller set, style-NO cutting hair), Skin (wash, apply lotion), Perineal Care(assist), Dressing (assist with dressing and lay out clothes for night and morning), Toileting, Light housekeeping, Assist with eating and light meal prep.”

We have had one individual express interest in the Wellness Check program partnered with the Sheriff’s Department this month.

Reminder if you didn’t realize that you have had a choice all this time??   Beaver Island Seniors are welcome to be a part of the Charlevoix County Mainland Senior Centers and the services, activities, lunches/dinners and events provided at the centers through the COA.  When you schedule your appointments, shopping and family events on the mainland, look to coordinate your visit with the opportunities the COA is providing, and make an appointment to participate if it is required.  Otherwise, just show up.  Services, Activities, lunches/dinners and events are listed for all Senior Center locations in the attached Newsletter.  Appointments are required for Foot Clinics and some events so please call the center you would like to visit directly to see what is needed.  Contact names, phone numbers and addresses are also available on our Newsletter.

The next COA Advisory Board Meetings are:

November 18, 2019 at the Boyne Area Senior Center at 10am

The COA Advisory Board meets all around Charlevoix County including Beaver Island so that they are accessible to all the aging population of Charlevoix County at a coordinated time and place each month. 

As a reminder, the Mainland Senior Centers Hours are:

9a-2p Monday through Friday October through April

9a-2p Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday May through September.  Wednesday’s hours are 2p-7p for Wednesday Night Dinners May through September (there is not lunch or Home Delivered Meals that day).

They are closed for most of the National Holidays.

Beaver Island COA Office Updates:

The BI COA Office is located at 26466 Donegal Bay Rd and the hours are 8a-5p Monday through Friday.  Please do not contact Kathie outside of this time frame for services.  The phone number is 231-448-2124.  “Sunday Dinners” are still planned for once a month August through May and is a lunch but the locations for these “dinners” may change dependent upon availability and costs.  The office is still closed for most of the National Holidays.    

  • All COA Offices and Senior Centers will be closed for the Thanksgiving Holiday on Thursday, November 28th and Friday November 29th.
  • Reminder: The BI COA Office has a computer available to be used by seniors on BI to access their Patient Portal with their Dr. Office; connect with Great Lakes ENT for Hearing Aid Adjustments, connect with Social Security, MY Free Taxes, Medicare and Medicaid resources along with a variety of other useful resources.  Use will need to be coordinated with Kathie.
  • Reminder: The COA BI Office now has Shelf Stable Snacks available for our Charlevoix County residents aged 60 years old and above to be available 1x a month for pick up. Selection will vary depending upon availability. Please contact Kathie for more information.
  • Reminder: The BI COA Office now has a Senior Resource Manual available for review.  Kathie is happy to make copies of information as needed.

Meal Voucher Program update:

Nutritional Program Renewal Agreements were signed and returned to the COA by the following establishments to date, so these are the only places on Beaver Island accepting Vouchers at this time:

  • Beaver Island Community School
  • Dalwhinnie Bakery and Deli

Other Updates:

  • Senior Snow Removal Program enrollment started October 21, 2019!  Kathie has enrollment packets available at the COA BI Office.  Program enrollment will be from 10/21/19 – 12/27/19 or until the budget has been expended.  Those seniors who are age 60 or older will be required to complete an eligibility packet including the Snow Removal Self Declaration Form for the 2019/2020 season, provide proof of all income along with a copy of their proof of residency.  A completed packet will be the sole way of determining eligibility at this time.  Once the senior has completed the packet and returned it to the COA Office and eligibility has been determined, the senior will receive a letter informing them that they are enrolled in the program along with the designated vouchers.  If the eligible senior leaves their residence for a month or longer, they will not be eligible for the program until they return to the residence.  This program is for homeowners and independent residential rentals as a supplemental support to the costs of snow removal and does NOT apply to commercial buildings, assisted living facilities or apartment complexes to offset their costs of snow removal.

Other Updates Continued:

  • Reminder that as of October 1, 2109, if you are 60 years old or older, a BI Charlevoix County Resident of 5 months or more and have successfully completed the application process and become a member for the BI FIT program through the Beaver Island Community Schools, the COA will pay the Beaver Island Community Schools $25 towards your annual membership fee for October 1, 2019 – September 30, 2020.  This supports the COA’s goal for creating a healthy exercise option for aging adults on BI.
    • As the school BI FIT program started in September 2019 for an annual term, the COA has paid the School for any approved Senior Applications they took in September and the School will reimburse the Island senior their membership fee.  Please contact them directly.
  • Reminder: New BI Student Volunteer Service Learning Program through the Beaver Island Community School!

This application will be available at BICS and the BI COA office.  Seniors will be able to fill out the back to offer a volunteer opportunity to a student or students.  This could be raking leaves, lawn care, painting, shoveling snow, cleaning a garage, moving, building or fixing something, etc.   After approval, students will be able to get assigned and complete the project in exchange for volunteer hours required for graduation.

Amy Wieland

Executive Director

Charlevoix County Commission on Aging

Work Phone: 231-237-0103

Email: wielanda@charlevoixcounty.org

Address: 218 W. Garfield Avenue, Charlevoix, MI  49720

View Senior Highlights HERE

St. James Township Meeting Documents for 11/6/19, 5:30 p.m.

Beaver Island Terrestrial Invasive Species Administration

BIAC Min Stds Draft 2.2019

BIAC Ordinance DRAFT 2.2019

Agenda--STJBagn11.06.19

Supervisor Lens11_november1.2019

Why Minimum Standards 2019

BIESA with CCE FEMA Reps

October 30, 2019

The Beaver Island Emergency Services Authority had a meeting scheduled for Halloween at 1 p.m., but it was rescheduled to the previous day at the same time. The Central Dispatch of CCE sent over some representatives to update the BIESA with the current happenings in the State of Michigan and the procedures that would need to be followed if there was a disaster here on Beaver Island. The limitations of this procedure, the timing of the arrival of help, and other topics were presented.

The two presenters were Megan Anderson from the Tri-County Office of Emergency Management, Homeland Security of the Petoskey office, and Lt. Michal DeCastro from the Michigan State Police, the Seventh District Coordinator of the Emergrncy Management and Homeland Security Division of the Gaylord, Michigan office.

The four current members of the BIESA, all three paramedics, and BINN Editor Joe Moore were those present to hear this presentation in its entirety. Kevin Boyle was in attendance also, but had to leave to go teach a class at BICS. Bill Kohls, Jim McDonough, Bob Turner, and Kitty McNamara were careful listeners, and had some specific questions that were answered by the two presenters.

Megan Anderson

Lt. Michal DeCastro

Emergency Services Authority Board

After the FEMA presentation, the BIESA continued their meeting to discuss the agenda presented. The board appointed Cody Randall as Acting Director, as Brian Meade needs to reduce his hours here on the island due to commitments on the mainland. There is one opening on the BIESA Board, and Chairman Bill Kohls stated that there will be a posting soon.

View video of the meeting HERE

Beaver Island Telecommunication Advisory Committee Meeting Schedule

2019-2020

B.I. AIRPORT COMMISSION AVIGATION AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS END

Dated October 15, 2019

Read the Press Release HERE

Waste Management Documents from October Meeting

October 21, 2019

Beaver Island Waste Management Committee Minutes October 15, 2019

DRAFT 10_15_19- Transfer Station_Recycling Attendant (Part-time)

BIWMC Structure, Repsonibility & Authority FINAL

Transfer Station Manager Draft

Fall Color Pictures Set to Music

October 20, 2019

The Fall Color pictures shown in the gallery of Fall Color Tour Part 2, are put into a video show with music by the Beaver Island Goodtime Boys. Included are "On the Beach of Beaver Island," "Over the Waves," and "Overlooked an Orchid."

View the video HERE

Fall BI Historical Society Newsletter

October 20, 2019

Beaver Island Transfer Station Information

BI Transfer Station and Recycle Center

Beaver Island Transfer Station Rates Effective 1_2019

The Emerald Ash Borer and Wood Movement to the Islands


In 2019, the Townships of Peaine and St. James passed an ordinance regulating and banning the movement of firewood, logs, lumber and wood pallets from the mainland to the Beaver Island Archipelago. Any wood brought to the Islands had to be bark free and/or processed in a manner which made it free of insects and disease.

The major concern was for the forests of the Archipelago, as there has been a massive incursion of the Emerald Ash Borer in the State of Michigan-- which has devastated the Ash tree population on the Michigan mainland. In hopes of keeping the Beaver Islands free of infestation, island volunteers have been monitoring our forests for years, with the help of the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.

In 2017, an Emerald Ash Borer trap captured a female emerald ash borer. Tests in 2018 and this spring have also found the beetle’s larvae in two isolated Ash locations on Beaver Island. A full court press has ensued with a multidisciplinary team coming to the Island in March of this year to conduct surveys and to begin eradication processes. The team, consisting of the Michigan Department of Agriculture, Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Charlevoix-Antrim-Kalkaska-Emmet Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (COKE CISMA) and volunteer members of the Beaver Island Association.

Pamela Grassmick, a resident of Beaver Island and a member of the Beaver Island Association, has been instrumental in bringing attention to the issue. She and others have worked for over a decade in monitoring our forests and wetlands for invasive species of all kinds. “We actually stripped the trees and looked at the larvae. There are different stages of the larvae and we found all stages present in two spots on the island,” Grassmick said.

Due to the early detection and the control methods now in place, forestry experts think Beaver Island has a good chance of controlling this pest. “The professionals feel confident we can control this on the island – if we get on top of it right now,” Grassmick said.

To that end, the Townships have passed this ordinance and will plan on enforcing it. Signs, bringing attention to the Ordinance, will be placed at all ports of entry to the island. The Beaver Island Ferry Company and both airports will have warning signs placed where travelers to the Islands can see them. Businesses, campgrounds and other gathering places will also post these signs. Pam Grassmick adds: “The Beaver Island Townships’ signs are a vital step in controlling the movement of untreated wood which could harbor invasive forest pests. Islanders recognize that the ecology and economic future are dependent on the health of our forests and it is great to see the township’s support in action.”

All are encouraged to buy or obtain fire wood locally, and to be especially mindful not to move Ash wood around the island or between the islands of the Beaver Island Archipelago.

For more information on the Emerald Ash Borer and the work that is taking place to eradicate it, please go to the Beaver Island Association website: www beaverislandassociation.org. The Township websites will also carry more information about this ordinance.


Donate to the Food Pantry

Use this button below to donate to the Food Pantry.

Donation goes to the Christian Church Food Pantry--Click the Donate Button on the far left and above.

Donate to the Live Streaming Project

The Live Streaming Project includes BICS Sports Events, Peaine Township Meetings, Joint Township Meetings, and much more.

Your donation may allow these events to be live streamed on the Internet at http://beaverisland.tv